Origins & purpose of these books ?

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MadProfessor8138

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I was wondering if anyone could tell me about the original intended purpose of these books .....they were given to me by my grandfather before he passed and I have about 20 of them.
They range from :
Templates
Lofting
Mock ups
Forming aluminum 4-5 different ways
Heat treating aluminum
Riviting
Welding aluminum
Repairs
Etc,etc.....

20200316_192054.jpg20200316_192042.jpg20200316_192003.jpg

Kevin
 

TFF

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Very cool. I don’t know the exact use but it’s the instructions on how to do those tasks. Either shop or person. I would guess each task learned required each booklet. Military is departmentalized and compartmentalized so one person might only learn one task while another will try to do all of them. That way no big text book needs to be printed, just chapters.
 

MadProfessor8138

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The booklets are actually extremely cool....a lot of useful information in them and each subject is broken down to an individual booklet.
My great grandfather was a pilot during the war and he gave those booklets to me when I was a teenager right before he passed.
I was just curious if there was a story pertaining to the origins of these booklets...I figured someone would chime in that they had first hand knowledge of using them at some point in their life/career.
At the bottom of the front cover it states that they are property of The Bureau of Aeronautics - Navy Department.
I'm actually curious why my grandfather would have had them.....think I need to talk with my mother and see if she would know.

Kevin
 

fly2kads

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I don't know about these booklets specifically, but these appear to be similar to some wartime training material that I have run across. Knowledge transfer was a big deal as the aviation industry was gearing up for wartime production, so both the U.S. government and private companies had a need for training materials. Are these dated? That may help prove/disprove that theory.
 

MadProfessor8138

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I will check to see if I can find a date on them tomorrow.
They are definitely military material.
About 15 years ago a guy from a local comic book store stopped by and was looking through an old comic book collection that I had trying to find a specific issue that a customer wanted.
He ran across the booklets and I remember him offering a very large fist full of cash for them...he wanted them for one reason or another.
He probably knew the story but he wasn't willing to share the info when I informed him that they aren't for sale...they have sentimental value for me and I won't part with them.

Kevin
 

MadProfessor8138

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Copyright 1942 by International Texbook Company.....
All rights reserved....
Printed in USA...

That would make them war time publications......

20200317_005906.jpg

Kevin
 
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bobm4360

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This set is a complete course of instruction for aircraft sheet metal work. Durng WWII, a lot of military vocational training was given in high school and vocational schools so that graduates could be inducted, sent to boot camp, and then to the fleet, without requiring in-service training. A Navy aviation structural mechanic was supposed to be able to fix any part of the aircraft except the engine and propeller. BTW, I have a set also and they aren't for sale either. Too much good information.
Bob
 

ktfiles

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There are 26 books in the set. I have a full set in good condition. Make me an offer.

1-Forming by Drop Hammer
2-Forming by Press Brake
3-Forming by Single-Action Hydraulic Press
4-Forming by Stretch Press
5-Forming by Section and Tube Bending
6-Forming by Draw Bench, Power Rolls and Spinning
7-Forming by Hydraulic and Crank Presses
8-Blanking by Routing
9-Blanking by Blanking and Piercing Dies
10-Blanking by Shearing Sawing and Nibbling
11-Aircraft Riveting Part 1
12-Aircraft Riveting Part 2
13-Lofting - Construction of Loft lines
14-Templates - Reproduction of Lines Part 1
15-Templates - Reproduction of Lines Part 2
16-Templates - Mock Up Part 1
17-Templates - Mock Up Part 2
18-Tooling - Steel Dies
19-Lofting - Use of the Loft
20-Heat Treatment of Aluminum Alloys
21-Tooling - Cast and Molded Dies
22-Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloys
23-Mathematical Technique of Lofting - Part 1
24-Mathematical Technique of Lofting - Part 2
25-Basic Problems
26-Tooling - Templates
 

BJC

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Bobm4360:

I see that you are at Oak Harbor.

Are you familiar with “P. Ponk Aviation” at 13W? He was the DAR for my TWTT Sportsman.


BJC
 

Hot Wings

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I don't know about these booklets specifically, but these appear to be similar to some wartime training material that I have run across.
That was my impression as well. They look very similar to some Navy books from the same period I have that are devoted to shipbuilding. Lots of good info in those if you are building things out of 1/2" steel plate. It is kind of sad to go through them and think about just how much general knowledge of this type has been lost over the years. The average ship yard worker of that time was expected to be the equivalent of a modern master millwright.

Pops could probably confirm or trash my assessment.
 

Victor Bravo

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Steve Knopp is also known for the aftermarket upgrade parts for Cessna 100 series tailwheel gear mounting structure. I met him once at a trade show. Pretty well respected in his niche.
 
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TerryM76

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I've got Forming Methods vol. 1,2,& 3 reprints. I think I bought them on eBay about two years ago.
 

cblink.007

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How cool are these?! I have scanned versions of similar Navy/Army/NACA texts, but they will never be as cool as the real thing you have!

I have some super old engineering texts in my library, and I always admire them. They're certainly the real showcase to my collection.

Preserve these the absolute best way you can!!

One of the great things I love about aviation; looking at the past always places the present and future into perspective, and in numerous cases, helps solve problems!

Again, I am in total envy!
 
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