Opener BlackFly

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TFF

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I agree. In the US you are either on the ground, water or in the air. There is no mixing of jurisdictions. I was told something similar from an FAA agent about OSHA. They were not there for OSHA enforcement only safety of flight. He did say they did have OSHAs phone number if the found something grossly wrong.
 

mcrae0104

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Are you thinking of Accelerometer or Accelerator?
Accelerometers have lots of applications in cars. Think ABS, traction control, vehicle stability aids, airbag deployment sensors, etc.
 

BBerson

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R/C modelers are now caught in a four way struggle between AMA (hobbyists group), commercial drone industry, congress and FAA. Same could happen with the Ultralight rule when "vehicle" becomes "aircraft".
Ultralights don't have much of a lobby to follow this.

Edit, airline pilots group also.
 

pictsidhe

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It's my understanding that WIGs that can't get out of ground effect are not deemed aircraft. It's flying capability, not altitude.
 

TFF

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The FAA defined their jurisdiction as any space above the ground. It came about because of the drones. In 2007 I went to the model airplane field multiple times a week because it looked like the hobby was going to be outlawed because of regulating airspace for drones. It still is very delicate situation for RC planes. Because WIG has no official recognition in the US. You are either flying or not. Right now you would be a test case if it came down to jurisdiction questions.
 

davidb

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It's my understanding that WIGs that can't get out of ground effect are not deemed aircraft. It's flying capability, not altitude.
That’s valid reasoning but there is not yet any legal ruling on the issue per the Forbes article I linked above.

I gather the FAA is the agency that does and will regulate “things” in the air that pose a risk to aviation safety but they are reactive. I don’t think they will proactively regulate BlackFly type vehicles. Perhaps Opener is a clever name. We’ll just have to wait and see how their hand plays out.
 
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cheapracer

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Aerowerx

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Accelerometers have lots of applications in cars. Think ABS, traction control, vehicle stability aids, airbag deployment sensors, etc.
Yes, but those are relatively recent in automotive applications. "Accelerators" have been around a lot longer. It was unclear in cheapracer's post as to which he was referring.
 

henryk

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-allmost all ACCELEROMETERs phisically are "G"-meters, they do not measure acceleration,
(a=dV/dt)...

("accelerometers" have not speedometer!)

g=9.81 m/s^2...
 
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Jay Kempf

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Neutral point is near 1/4 chord. For a biplane like this with equal? size wings, it's 1/4 of the way between the 1/4 chords of the wings.
Blackfly seems to have it somewhere manageable at any rate. Once you are into -ve margin, whatever is adding dynamix stability needs to be correctly tuned. The more negative, the more accurate it needs to be. The upshot of this is that changing the aircrafts properties, such as different payload weight and or position, changes the tuning. The payload is the 'pilot'. Get the margin -ve enough, he can't scratch his head without upsetting things. So, -ve margin greatly complicates the FBW task, more so with nearly 1/2 the weight a human. Thinking this is easy underestimates the task...
This doesn't sound right to me. That would mean you are considering the tandem wing as one long chord. It is two trimmed wings flying in close formation. The force diagram between the two lift vectors ends up equidistant doesn't it? Which incorporates both wings and their static margins into the overall system. That would mean that the resolved lift vector for the system would be .25C of one of the wings forward of the center between the two wings...?? Seems the front wing would be grossly overloaded in the scenario you describe. Biplanes with normal stagger and overlap are not equal wings flying separated. They are rigged to make the front area not overlapped with the lower wing give up first. They normally have different AOA and sometimes different airfoils as I remember it. Apples and bananas or am I missing something?
 
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