O-100-- interesting new engine

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Grelly

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Very sad news. I was never in the market for either an O-100 or a CrackerJack, but that didn't stop me cheering him on from the side lines. We need more Pete Plumb's.

He is going to go down as one of my aviation heros.

Best wishes to all his friends and family.

Grelly
 

EzyBuildWing

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Yes, .....Peter's passing is a tragic loss to the aviation community. My condolences to his family.

Franklin's 2-cylinder engine was 117 cubic inches( 1917 cc ), had 8.5:1 Compression, weighed 167 lbs, and produced 60 HP at 3200 RPM at sea level.
Half a 4-cylinder Jabiru would be 67 cubic inches, 8:1 CR, and would produce 40 HP at 3300 RPM(using Jabiru's 4-cylinder (wt: 137 lbs), data sheet).
Seems to me around 45 HP to 50 HP from an 0-100 is achievable.
Maybe Jab could consider producing a 2-cylinder version?
 

BBerson

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I would use caution about market assumptions until a cost of manufacture is determined. Also liability insurance.
 

addicted2climbing

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Liability insurance is likely a big factor. However since Pete's plan was to offer a kit, that may well have been his reason to avoid some of it as the actual flying engine was built by the end user and unless a component failed and failed do to design or MFG error it would be tough to prove. Unless it became a trend.

Thoughts on this?
 

Yellowhammer

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This is very painful to write, but it needs to be done.

My good friend Pete Plumb passed away a couple of weeks ago. He had a heart attack during his morning walk at the airport.

The stresses of trying to run two or three aviation businesses had damaged his heart and given him a near-death experience several months ago, he had gone in for heart surgery, stents, bypass, etc. and come out of it OK. He had recovered with a reasonably clean bill of health, and after the prescribed rest and recuperation he had gone back to work building wood wings, finalizing the design of the Cracker Jack 2, and continuing the development and testing of the O-100 engine as described in this thread.

But apparently the stresses of running these ventures, and desperately trying to complete the O-100 project and get to market with a truly world class engine that brought together the best of the old and the new, was too much for his heart.

I have been in touch with Pete's closest associate and Pete's family. They asked me to not make any public announcements for a short time, and I have respected that wish. This evening I asked the family for permission to let the HBA group know about his passing, and they permitted me to do so.

The family DOES NOT want to have to deal with inquiries about the engine; they have asked me to be the gatekeeper for that, and for me to absorb/filter/manage any and all inquiries about the engine. So please, at the request of a grieving family please do not contact them about the O-100 at this time.

What I CAN say is that the O-100 engine is hopefully NOT going to disappear. There is interest by Pete's family to have the engine development finished and brought to market. They do retain and will aggressively defend the intellectual property, design rights, all parts, tooling, parts manufacturing relationships, etc. etc. None of the existing engine parts or components are in any danger of being lost, scrapped, stolen, or otherwise scattered.

When the time is right for the family, I will facilitate and assist them in discussions about how, when, and with who to proceed with the engine project.

The only thing I can promise everyone on this HBA forum is that like most of you I want to see the engine succeed, and I will do my part in pushing it toward that outcome. I'll be glad to answer questions that have not been answered in this post already.

Also, although I'm not aware of any dates or plans at this point, it is the family's intent to eventually have a celebration of life and memorial event for family and friends. If and when I hear about that, I will post it here.

What a shock VB. I have been thinking about Pete and his engine quite often lately. My thoughts and prayers go out to you and his family.

A loss of a fine steward of aviation indeed.

Yellowhammer
 

Topaz

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This is very painful to write, but it needs to be done.

My good friend Pete Plumb passed away a couple of weeks ago. ...
I'm devastated to hear this. Having met him several times, he was kind, warm-hearted, friendly, and absolutely passionate about his engine, his airplane woodworking, and aviation in general. 2020 has taken so many well-known people, but for me, this is the worst blow of all.

Godspeed, Pete.

@Victor Bravo - Thanks for letting us know. I'm deeply sorry for your loss. Please extend my condolences to his family and other friends.
 

Yellowhammer

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Dear Friends,

I just received my February edition of Kitplanes magazine and it has the 2021 engine buyers guide included. There is a nice write up on the Pegasus and Pete's work. Very informative. However, they must have not gotten the news about Pete's passing.

Victor Bravo, maybe you could make them aware of this? That way they can keep those interested in this engine up to speed and so they do not loose interest. I, like so many others here, want to see this engine become a gigantic success.

Just a thought. Great write up on the Pegasus none the less.

Yellowhammer
 

Victor Bravo

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The engine will hopefully go forward, and I'm trying to work with the family and get it into the right hands. The family sincerely wants it in the right hands, not sitting in a desk drawer of a competitor, and likewise not in the hands of many well-meaning (but not equipped) wannabee's.

I sincerely apologize for any perceived information blackout or cryptic aspects of this, but I must respect the family's wishes and I must respect what I know Pete's intentions/hopes/plans/dreams/strengths/faults were.
 

bmcj

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However, they must have not gotten the news about Pete's passing.
Typical of major publications like this, submission deadlines and print schedules often require lead times of a month or more. The issue you have was probably set in stone before the news of Pete’s passing was released.
 

Dana

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At the moment the April issue of Kitplanes is being finalized (I know this because I have an article in it and I got the final check copy yesterday)... so yes, the news of Pete's passing wouldn't have made it in time for the February issue.
 

Protech Racing

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Sad for sure. I talked to Peter last Feb about building the Fuel injection for his engine, and possibly building the kits. He was supposed to send a few pictures and engineering drawings of the wheel and case near it for mounting a trigger wheel and sensor .
I said that it would be easier to send the engine and would fab a simple system for it. At the time, he said that he did not have one .
I liked Peter and the idea of the engine . I think the market is weak for an expensive engine in cheap airplanes tho. Good luck to whoever takes this on. I could complete it with help from another racer bud of mine that builds Half Chevy Midget engines.
 

Victor Bravo

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I'm hoping that the market is strong for a reliable, slow-turning, direct drive engine that has 75 years of safety and trust built into most of it. If you factor the cost of airframe replacement or repair into the equation, a reliable and trustworthy engine becomes rather cost-effective.

The airlines have figured this out fairly well, and gladly spend several million dollars on each of their engines, because it's cheaper that way.
 

Protech Racing

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I think the completed cost estimate was $7-10K for 47HP. A market for sure as it is a very pretty and should be durable powerplant . The best marketing would be to install 2 on aircraft, fly them at all of the air shows,/insta gram/u tube etc. Take orders and build engines.
I would be happy to make it happen ,but not with my money .. The fuel injection is less than $1000 complete . maybe less than that in bulk . I use the Microsquirt almost every day . The few failures have been owner induced for the most part.
My airplane power plant money is going into the big single and V twins development.
 

Victor Bravo

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The O-100 engine was estimated (within conservative, reasonable thinking) at 58 HP.

The reason for this was that it used slightly higher compression pistons compared to the O-200, and it was balanced to a higher degree, specifically to allow high-reliability while running at 2900 RPM instead of the stock O-200 rated RPM of 2750.

So although exactly half the displacement of the O-200, it made a little over half the horsepower.

That is WITHOUT further experimentation with fuel injection, different carburetors, different intake plenum, electronic and/or higher power ignition.
 
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