Not quite a crash

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

Riggerrob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Messages
2,839
Location
Canada
Back when round parachutes were fashionable, I helped retrieve dozens of parachutes from trees.
Why or how I retained tree-climbing skills well into my 50s is a mystery to me?????

But as parachutes grew corners and student skills improved, I had to pick fewer and fewer parachutes from trees. During the decade that I worked at Pitt Meadows, I only had to retrieve one junior jumper from the trees and another from blackberry bushes.
 
Last edited:

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,277
Location
USA.
Blackberry bushes, that doesn't sound good. One time I was on a trail riding a 4 wheeler and there was a tree across the trail. Got off and try to move the end of the tree at the edge of a very steep hill side. To steep to climb up without a rope. The tree move and I fell head first over the bank that was covered with blackberries vines about 6' tall. Was flipping end over end for about 75' through the vines. Stopped at the bottom and it knocked the breath out of me and another man on a 4 wheeler stopped on the trail, couldn't see me but ask if I was OK. Took a little while to answer. Bleeding all over and a broken tree limb ran into my leg about 3/4". Doc said, lucky I didn't get a broken back. Small cuts from top to bottom on both sides from all the blackberry vines.
 

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
7,349
Blackberry bushes, that doesn't sound good. One time I was on a trail riding a 4 wheeler and there was a tree across the trail. Got off and try to move the end of the tree at the edge of a very steep hill side. To steep to climb up without a rope. The tree move and I fell head first over the bank that was covered with blackberries vines about 6' tall. Was flipping end over end for about 75' through the vines. Stopped at the bottom and it knocked the breath out of me and another man on a 4 wheeler stopped on the trail, couldn't see me but ask if I was OK. Took a little while to answer. Bleeding all over and a broken tree limb ran into my leg about 3/4". Doc said, lucky I didn't get a broken back. Small cuts from top to bottom on both sides from all the blackberry vines.
I hope you at least filled up on blackberries.

My son lived on Vancouver Island for a few years. Blackberries grow wild everywhere there, like a weed. He was at the supermarket one day, sitting in the truck waiting for his wife to come out, and saw some people coming out of the store with those little clear plastic boxes of blackberries. Paying for blackberries, when behind the store and almost everywhere else they grew wild in great profusion. Unbelievable. One could pick enough berries to fill that container in about two minutes.
 

billyvray

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
993
Location
Newnan, GA
I have a blackberry story.
My father and a friend had put together a Rotec Rally during the height of the ultralight craze. They had flown it quite a lot and were getting proficient.

Off the end of the short rc field runway, there was a large stand of blackberry bushes; most of an acre.

One particular evening a light fog had begun to settle around the blackberry end of the field. As my father was coming in on final he got down right on the fog and the mighty little two stroker bogged and cut out. The Rally settled sedately down into the bushes - about 50 ft short of the clearing....
My father was wearing the epitome of 80s crash gear - cutoff blue jean shorts, tennis shoes, an open face metallic paint motorcycle helmet, and no shirt.

By the team he clawed his way out of the bramble he had let loose a near-constant string of expletives and his skin looked like he had been bathing cats.

It took hours of machete work and a borrowed bucket truck to get the little Rally out from the thick bushes.

Miss you, Pop!
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,277
Location
USA.
In 1952 on Grandfathers farm, the chickens got a disease and died. Same for the hogs. Gardens didn't do very good, but the black berries did very well and we picked washtubs full and canned them. We ran out of food in the middle of winter and all we had to eat for almost 2 months was the canned black berries. Then about the end of March the dandelions, poke greens, etc started to come up and helped. Then a cow had a calf and wasn't long that we had fresh milk. Nothing ever tasted so good. Missing a few meals for 3 or 4 days is nothing like long term hunger. In the movies you see people that has been without food for a while try to eat as fast as possible, its just the opposite, you digestive system shuts down and its very hard to start eating again. Very , very small amounts at first. That was also a very hard winter and we had 3' snow drifts inside the house. Beside the sidewalk to my hanger is a large flat sandstone seat that was the back of the fireplace were I thought we were going to freeze to death that winter
I still like blackberries.
 
Last edited:

Bill-Higdon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
2,447
Location
Salem, Oregon, USA
In 1952 on Grandfathers farm, the chickens got a disease and died. Same for the hogs. Gardens didn't do very good, but the black berries did very well and we picked washtubs full and canned them. We ran out of food in the middle of winter and all we had to eat for almost 2 months was the canned black berries. Then about the end of March the dandelions, poke greens, etc started to come up and helped. Then a cow had a calf and wasn't long that we had fresh milk. Nothing ever tasted so good. Missing a few meals for 3 or 4 days is nothing like long term hunger. In the movies you see people that has been without food for a while try to eat as fast as possible, its just the opposite, you digestive system shuts down and its very hard to start eating again. Very , very small amounts at first. That was also a very hard winter and we had 3' snow drifts inside the house. Beside the sidewalk to my hanger is a large flat sandstone seat that was the back of the fireplace were I thought we were going to freeze to death that winter
I still like blackberries.
I remember a friend who survived the Bataan Death March & Japanese captivity talking about how they got their digestive systems working properly again.
 
Last edited:

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
7,349
In the movies you see people that has been without food for a while try to eat as fast as possible, its just the opposite, you digestive system shuts down and its very hard to start eating again. Very , very small amounts at first.
I read a book written by a guy that survived the ditching of his bomber in the Pacific. The crew got out and into a couple of rubber dinghies. They were in those boats for weeks, with nothing safe to drink other than rainwater, and pretty much nothing to eat other than what fish might jump into the boat.

The first thing they wanted when a ship picked them up? A cup of coffee.

I can relate to that.
 

Monty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2010
Messages
1,365
Location
Fayetteville, AR / USA
I'm going to lighten the mood with my blackberry story. Before the infestation of Japanese beetles, blackberries were plentiful here. One day I was picking a bunch to make some beer. A nice blackberry wheat beer for summer. As I was working, I heard something falling through the brambles. It sounded like a bowling ball smashing its way down. Then it was moving erratically through the patch on the ground. Of course I had to know what the heck was making all that racket. Eventually I found an incredibly FAT drunk rat. It's paws and face were purple. It was trying to escape from me in a drunken stupor. It couldn't even walk or run straight and kept falling over. That was good for a giant belly laugh.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,277
Location
USA.
Grandfather had about 40 apple trees on the farm. We usually raised about 200+ chickens and we would load the buggy ( about a 4' sq bed behind the seat) with egg crates and go the 8 miles off the ridge to a country store. Trade for sugar, coffee, salt etc, items we couldn't grow. In the fall ripe apples would fall off the trees and ferment on the ground and the chickens and free range hogs would lay under the trees in a drunken stupor all day. You haven't seen anything until you see a drunk chicken. Hogs just fall over and go to sleep.
Chickens would try to walk and start running sideways and fall over on there back with their wing flapping and their feet straight up and squawking.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,277
Location
USA.
I remember a friend who survived the Butan Death March & Japanese captivity talking about how they got their digestive systems working properly again
Used to work with a man that survived the Butan Death March.
I had appendicitis when I was 35 years old and got to the hospital 3.5 days after they ruptured. In a coma for a few days and went 30 days without any food by mouth. Lost 40 lbs. Hard to get eating again.
 

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
7,349
As I was working, I heard something falling through the brambles. It sounded like a bowling ball smashing its way down. Then it was moving erratically through the patch on the ground. Of course I had to know what the heck was making all that racket. Eventually I found an incredibly FAT drunk rat.
Dad was picking huckleberries. Those are always found wild, always in the forest. He hears something moving around a few feet away, so stood up to see what it was. A black bear stood up. They looked at each other for a minute, then each went their separate ways.
 

cluttonfred

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
9,632
Location
World traveler
One point of order, not to be snarky but just so people don't get the wrong associations. Bhutan is a little country in the Himalayas between China and India, isolated and they keep it that way, but nothing to do with WWII. The Bataan death march was on the Bataan Peninsula near Manila Bay on Luzon Island in the Philippines.
 

Riggerrob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Messages
2,839
Location
Canada
I'm going to lighten the mood with my blackberry story. Before the infestation of Japanese beetles, blackberries were plentiful here. One day I was picking a bunch to make some beer. A nice blackberry wheat beer for summer. As I was working, I heard something falling through the brambles. It sounded like a bowling ball smashing its way down. Then it was moving erratically through the patch on the ground. Of course I had to know what the heck was making all that racket. Eventually I found an incredibly FAT drunk rat. It's paws and face were purple. It was trying to escape from me in a drunken stupor. It couldn't even walk or run straight and kept falling over. That was good for a giant belly laugh.
That rat was eating yesterday's berries. You know, the berries that are past their prime and are starting to ferment.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,277
Location
USA.
One point of order, not to be snarky but just so people don't get the wrong associations. Bhutan is a little country in the Himalayas between China and India, isolated and they keep it that way, but nothing to do with WWII. The Bataan death march was on the Bataan Peninsula near Manila Bay on Luzon Island in the Philippines.
Thanks, that's how you spell Bataan.
Murphy's law-- The biggest , juiciest blackberry will have a JuneBug or a Stink Bug on the back side that you didn't see but you found out when you put it in your mouth.
 

Bille Floyd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2019
Messages
797
...
The first thing they wanted when a ship picked them up? A cup of coffee.

I can relate to that.

I'm drinking my addiction to coffee right now ; while reading
these Great stories !!!

Thanks for all the Awesome reading, Guys !!

Bille
 

bmcj

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
14,275
Location
Fresno, California
That rat was eating yesterday's berries. You know, the berries that are past their prime and are starting to ferment.
Driving slow down the road in King’s Canyon Sequoia park, we drove past a bear Cub curled up around a berry bush on the edge of the road, happily gnawing on the fermented berries without a care in the world or concern about the people passing by.
 
Top