Non Bypass Oil Filter Oil Starvation

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

PMD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2015
Messages
1,179
Location
Martensville SK
Pretty good info here:

Nice pages from Tempest. In the real world of starting aircraft parked outside in the North, we use insulated cowl covers. In my day, we used interior car warmers (750/850 watt 120V heaters with a fan) Adel clamped to the motor mounts. Not at all legal, but 90% of how every airplane was set up. On singles, that meant the engine, oil, filter, cooler and BATTERY were toasty warm. Form me, thousands of starts at -40 or more with no related troubles.

When no power around long before my time in the bush: oil and batteries were brought inside for the night and often a tarp was draped over the engine with a smudge pot burning inside and the ground!!!!!!!! That progressed on into Herman Nelson heaters where there was power to run them.

For bush starts without power: in our part of the world we used Tundra Toasters (designed and first manufactured by our own Craftsven) that used a/c battery power and propane to heat the engine. I think these were inspired by him seeing me use a VW gas heater (Eberspacher BN2) for that purpose.

One way or another, almost everything I have seen is disgusting inasmuch as the original engine and airframe manufacturers all seem to be totally ignorant of the fact that we have to start engines in the winter, and some of us don't live in Florida or Arizona in December. If a modern design of liquid cooled engine was actually done to required standards for safe and reliable cold starts: there would be a fully certified and integrated emersion heater in the oil sump, one in the oil tank (if used), one in the water jacket and a silicone pad under the battery - all properly wired to a 120V or 250V plug with a cover through the cowling. Further: every airplane should have the option from factory of a really decent fitted insulated cowl cover.

Sorry for the rant, but this has been a sore point to me for a half century. IMHO: the vast majority of engine wear takes place on startup.
 

Bill-Higdon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
2,535
Location
Salem, Oregon, USA
Nice pages from Tempest. In the real world of starting aircraft parked outside in the North, we use insulated cowl covers. In my day, we used interior car warmers (750/850 watt 120V heaters with a fan) Adel clamped to the motor mounts. Not at all legal, but 90% of how every airplane was set up. On singles, that meant the engine, oil, filter, cooler and BATTERY were toasty warm. Form me, thousands of starts at -40 or more with no related troubles.

When no power around long before my time in the bush: oil and batteries were brought inside for the night and often a tarp was draped over the engine with a smudge pot burning inside and the ground!!!!!!!! That progressed on into Herman Nelson heaters where there was power to run them.

For bush starts without power: in our part of the world we used Tundra Toasters (designed and first manufactured by our own Craftsven) that used a/c battery power and propane to heat the engine. I think these were inspired by him seeing me use a VW gas heater (Eberspacher BN2) for that purpose.

One way or another, almost everything I have seen is disgusting inasmuch as the original engine and airframe manufacturers all seem to be totally ignorant of the fact that we have to start engines in the winter, and some of us don't live in Florida or Arizona in December. If a modern design of liquid cooled engine was actually done to required standards for safe and reliable cold starts: there would be a fully certified and integrated emersion heater in the oil sump, one in the oil tank (if used), one in the water jacket and a silicone pad under the battery - all properly wired to a 120V or 250V plug with a cover through the cowling. Further: every airplane should have the option from factory of a really decent fitted insulated cowl cover.

Sorry for the rant, but this has been a sore point to me for a half century. IMHO: the vast majority of engine wear takes place on startup.
"inspired by him seeing me use a VW gas heater (Eberspacher BN2)" or the old Stewart Warner Gas fired heaters use in a lot of things including aircraft
 

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
7,485
Nice pages from Tempest. In the real world of starting aircraft parked outside in the North, we use insulated cowl covers. In my day, we used interior car warmers (750/850 watt 120V heaters with a fan) Adel clamped to the motor mounts. Not at all legal, but 90% of how every airplane was set up. On singles, that meant the engine, oil, filter, cooler and BATTERY were toasty warm. Form me, thousands of starts at -40 or more with no related troubles.
Transport legalized that in 1997. https://tc.canada.ca/en/aviation/re...orthiness-notices-b037-edition-1-4-april-1997
 
  • Like
Reactions: PMD

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,485
Location
USA.
I used an old VW gasoline heater converted to propane mounted on a wagon as an engine preheater for about 20 years. Made a plate over the exhaust to heat hot drinks and food.
Put the cabin heat on and the hot air would even warn the cockpit, with a blanket over everything.
 

PMD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2015
Messages
1,179
Location
Martensville SK
The SOBs only took 40 or so years to figure this one out. Left many of us hung out as closet criminals for decades. We would remove the sheet metal screws and replace them with steel/steel blind rivets to keep them from shaking apart. Would also wrap the motor mount with rubber tape (hockey tape IIRC) to keep the Adel clamps from wearing the tubing.
 

PMD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2015
Messages
1,179
Location
Martensville SK
I used an old VW gasoline heater converted to propane mounted on a wagon as an engine preheater for about 20 years. Made a plate over the exhaust to heat hot drinks and food.
Put the cabin heat on and the hot air would even warn the cockpit, with a blanket over everything.
My favourite setup was in my 1970 Type III: I built an elbow and put a cap on it under the hood, so I just had to pull up to an airplane and run a 3" flex duct into the cover, pull the timer out and head into the terminal, gas shack, flight school or my office/trailer for breakfast/coffee.
 
Top