Non- Biased Engine Reviews -Viking

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Arkan

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Jun 6, 2021
Messages
79
@PagoBay.... top right of each of those videos says exactly what I mean, that's my point. Both videos you have shown are from Vikings YouTube. Their logo is in the top left.

I can find complete build videos of people using just about any engine you can think of, LS1 chevy conversions, Yamaha conversions, I have yet to find someone building a plane recording the whole process start to finish. Then recording each step of phase one, and phase two using a Viking engine. All the videos are from Viking.
 

[email protected]

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Aug 23, 2021
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DOES ANYONE OUT THERE KNOW WHERE TO GO TO HAVE A 2020 HONDA FIT ELECTRIC BODY INJECTION CONVERTED TO A THROTTLE BODY INJECTION
 

mm4440

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Jan 14, 2012
Messages
290
Location
LA area, CA
So... Lycomings have failed in flight, Continental's have failed in flight, Rotax has failed in Flight, Corvair has failed in flight, LS engine has failed in flight, Jabiru and so has the Vikings. It seems just about all of them have. What can be done? Perhaps one person is not so savory, but I guess this is why we ask no? I was just wanting to find if there were any people flying that were happy and without issue. What engine should one consider? The Rotax?
If you want to avoid engine failures, fly sailplanes. You only have to worry on tow for a short time and if it fails someone else has to pay to fix it.
 

mm4440

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Jan 14, 2012
Messages
290
Location
LA area, CA
One quick clarification: FAA's policy is: if there is technology available to meet the reliability numbers in AC 23.1309, the reliability numbers are a requirement; if there is NO technology to meet those numbers, then the maximum that can be achieved is acceptable. Obviously piston engine technology does not allow an engine which, as a unit, meets the 10^5 criteria. Therefore the attainable piston engine reliability today - 1 failure in 10000-13000 hours - is acceptable. But the idea is to do whatever possible to meet those numbers. That AC is common sense. As for turboprops and turbofans, that is a whole different ball game. P&W PT6 reliability average is around 1 IFSD in 330000 hours, and big turbofans such as the GE90 (Boeing 777) are 1 IFSD in more than half a million hours. Interesting to remember that, 65 years ago, turbo compound radial engines (such as in the DC-7 and in the Super Constellation) could barely meet 1 failure in 1000 hours!
How do you tell the difference between a DC-6 and a DC-7? 4 engine airplane with 3 blade props and a 3 engine airplane with 4 blade props.
 

Alessandre

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Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
70
I changed my concepts about car engine reliability, recently I opened the engine of my wife's car, a GM 2.0 L turbo because there was a lot of carbon at the valves and piston rings because of the direct injection, the car have 40k miles, I heard about and it's happening with all the direct injected engines except Toyota that uses 2 systems, direct and port inject, her car was with high blow by pressure because the rings was stuck with a lot of carbon. I don't know how Viking is dealing with this issue how they are using direct injected engines.
 

rv6ejguy

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Jun 26, 2012
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4,689
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Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Pretty well all DI engines, which don't also have port injection, will have the carboned up valve issue eventually. Many other OEMs are now copying Toyota/ Lexus now by adding port injection as well.
 
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TarDevil

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Jun 29, 2010
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1,023
Location
Coastal North Carolina/USA
IMG_20211006_135136.jpg
My son sent me this picture. That's my granddaughter going up for a Young Eagles flight. I fired off a text message asking what powered that Rans since it clearly wasn't the usual Rotax.
He replied, "I dunno, something converted from a Honda Fit with a redrive attached."
She lived. As did my other 3 grandkids.
This dude swears by his Viking.
 

Chris Matheny

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Nov 26, 2019
Messages
205
Location
St. Paris OH
I changed my concepts about car engine reliability, recently I opened the engine of my wife's car, a GM 2.0 L turbo because there was a lot of carbon at the valves and piston rings because of the direct injection, the car have 40k miles, I heard about and it's happening with all the direct injected engines except Toyota that uses 2 systems, direct and port inject, her car was with high blow by pressure because the rings was stuck with a lot of carbon. I don't know how Viking is dealing with this issue how they are using direct injected engines.
Viking doesn't have to follow the government standards and direct blow by back into the intake manifold. The oil vapors from the pcv system on the direct injection engines go to the intake and into the cylinders to be burnt. Port injection kept the back of the valves clean and direct injection doesn't have that luxury without running 2 systems. Viking I believe is just dumping the crankcase pressure and oil vapors to atmosphere so it will never deposit on the valves. This could pose other longevity issues though as the vacuum created in the pcv system helps keep the thin rings they use these days seated in the upper RPM where they are running their engines. Time will tell.
 

Alessandre

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Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
70
For my wife's car especially I gonna use this tip that I got from internet, it's called catch can, that catch the oil from blow by and deposits in a can, I think I can take it longer before need to open the engine again to clean the piston rings and valves.

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