No Roll landing system

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Derswede

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It would seem easier just to fly into the Tree. Had an old friend who managed to drop his 182 on top of a large Oak. Fuel management issue (fuel in storage tank at FBO, not in aircraft). Did less damage than one would think to the plane, the tree did not survive, unfortunately.

Derswede
 

BJC

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I would have like to see that Pitts landing.
On ice. Full rudder and power upon touch down. Takes some practice to stop it at 180 degrees. Stops facing backwards after 100 feet. Mastered and performed by Delmar Benjamin.

I’ve not seen it, but I do believe it.


BJC
 

Aerowerx

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Marion, Ohio
Isn't there a maneuver called the "falling leaf"? Kinda hard on landing gear, from what I understand.
 

Pops

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The shortest known Pitts S-1S landing without damage is 100 feet - on ice.

If no trees are around, get a good headwind: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFllgHbjnlU


BJC
I had a landing just like this one time. I had a gps ground speed going down wind at 3K of 245 mph in my 1959 Cessna 172. I needed to get fuel and at the airport I turned base as I entered downwind. Still had a good mile final. I was running WOT on final and not moving, so I went down to about 25' above the corn field and got a little ground speed at WOT and landed just like the Cub in the video. That was the easy part, the hard part was getting the airplane off the runway and taxeing crosswind to the ramp behind the big hanger without putting the airplane on its top. Flew 11.5 hrs that day.
 

Derswede

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Reminds me of a friend who did a restoration on an Aeronca C3. Headed out to Oshkosh, ended up with such a strong headwind he said that he was losing ground to pedestrians. Decided to land, as fuel was low, and as he was unsure about making the nearest field, decided to land on the large farm he had been hovering over for a half hour. Eased it down at almost full throttle, but found he was going backwards. He ended up in the lee side of a barn, got it on the ground, chopped power and hopped out to hold the plane. The farms owner, who had apparently been watching the whole thing with bemusement, hopped out, caught the other wing to help hold it, pulled the plane into shelter in the barn. The farmer thought that the event was the neatest thing, put him up for the evening, and even got him some fuel. Landing run was about a foot, he said.

Derswede
 

Pops

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Reminds me of a friend who did a restoration on an Aeronca C3. Headed out to Oshkosh, ended up with such a strong headwind he said that he was losing ground to pedestrians. Decided to land, as fuel was low, and as he was unsure about making the nearest field, decided to land on the large farm he had been hovering over for a half hour. Eased it down at almost full throttle, but found he was going backwards. He ended up in the lee side of a barn, got it on the ground, chopped power and hopped out to hold the plane. The farms owner, who had apparently been watching the whole thing with bemusement, hopped out, caught the other wing to help hold it, pulled the plane into shelter in the barn. The farmer thought that the event was the neatest thing, put him up for the evening, and even got him some fuel. Landing run was about a foot, he said.

Derswede
I watched my old flight instructor fly a Super Cub for 30 minutes and never crossed the end of the runway. Just throttled back a little and backed up to the takeoff end and go to WOT and fly back to the end of the runway again and again.
The day in the 1959 C-172, once I got it behind the large hanger a couple men held the wings while it was fuel up, I let the wind blow me down the taxie way and didn't try to go crosswind to go out on the runway, just gave it a little rudder and the wind weather veined it into the wind sliding the nose wheel sideways and I took off on the taxie way.
Paid very good that day or I would have stayed home.
 

Jerry Lytle

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Jan 3, 2014
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Newport, Oregon
Don't know about landing but learned a lot about takeoff performance. I loved the way my BC12D was so willing to leave the ground especially when solo. I hadd a total of about 80 hours PIC. Being young and invincible I tested it out one breezy day at Tillamook Oregon, and old WW2 airfield with wide runways in the typical WW2 triangle configuration. Taxing out to the active, on intersecting runway, I could see that the wind was directly on my beam. I was overcome by something just short of common sense, pulled to the downwind edge of the asphalt, a few feet outside the runway lighting, pointed into the wind, held the brakes until they wouldn't hold any more, released and headed for my destiny. I must say I puckered a little when I passed the lights on the far side of the runway and was still on the ground. There was a three foot crop of grass hay facing me when the wheels left the gound. I did have a little grass caught in my wheels when I got back to Springfield. As I removed the hay a little voice in my head said "You have done it once, you do not need to do it again."
 

stuart fields

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Inyokern California
Lets see..I found this in the rotor craft forum. My helicopters have aways demonstrated a No Roll Landing System. That said, I have had experience with cross winds and "Stuck Wing" kinds of aircraft. Actually had more trouble with the Aircoupe and its no rudder pedals.
 
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