nicopress tool hole size

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by don january, Apr 19, 2018.

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  1. Apr 19, 2018 #1

    don january

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    don january

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    Could someone tell me the size of the hole in the jaw of a nicopress tool similar to this. nicopress tool.jpg for 1/8" cable? I was guessing about 5/16 but maybe someone has one and can get a proper number for me. Thanks Don J
     
  2. Apr 19, 2018 #2

    Dana

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    I don't know the tool size but the gauge dimension is .343-.353 for 1/8".
     
  3. Apr 19, 2018 #3

    don january

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    Thank you Dana that does help
     
  4. Apr 19, 2018 #4

    Victor Bravo

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    Are you talking about the "hole" size for an oval sleeve (for an end loop fitting) or a round "stop sleeve"? I have a small Nico tool for a 3/64" cable stop sleeve, and that has a round hole. But I believe that the right tool for an oval sleeve looks like a small figure 8 and not a round hole ???

    Those measurements used to be in the Aircraft Spruce catalog, not sure if they still are.
     
  5. Apr 20, 2018 #5

    don january

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    Yes VB the oval end loop. I wasn't sure if it was a circle or a slot shape. Guess I can stop by the local EAA and see if there is one around.
     
  6. Apr 20, 2018 #6

    Aesquire

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    Duplicate.

    I have also used the bar type tool. It uses two bolts to tighten onto the sleeve. Meant for tight spaces and cheap builders, it can do good work. Slow and tedious. Use the available go gauges for safety or other appropriate measuring tool. Micrometers are fine..

    Not all tools are accurate, some other brands use different dimensions. Caveat Emptor.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
  7. Apr 20, 2018 #7
  8. Apr 20, 2018 #8

    Aesquire

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  9. Apr 20, 2018 #9

    don january

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  10. Apr 20, 2018 #10

    Aesquire

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    Worth emphasis.

    Tin plated copper or stainless are the only acceptable materials for stainless wire. Do NOT USE ZINC PLATED OR UNPLATED COPPER.

    If you don't use galvanized wire, don't even allow ZINC PLATED bits in your shop at all. Treat them like poison.

    If you don't use stainless wire, don't have the tin plated ones in the shop.

    If you use both stainless and galvanized wire, segregate the ZINC & TIN plated bits with fanatical and religious intolerance to the max. Don't put the boxes side by side. Tin to the one wall. Zinc to the opposite.

    They have a slightly different sheen when brand new. After a week you can't tell them apart.

    I may be a bit over the top on this, but corrosion is subtle and can be deadly.
     
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  11. Apr 20, 2018 #11

    don january

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    Ok it's time for me to come clean with you all. I have these cutters laying around and sure would like to make a swagging tool out of it so that's why I asked about the hole size. I know the tolerance is very critical and maybe I'm just having a wet dream. It would be a nice addition to my tool crib. bolt cutter.jpg I thought of drilling a 5/16 hole and seeing what the end result would be.
     
  12. Apr 21, 2018 #12

    TFF

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    If you do make it a tool, I would not fly with its use unless you can do a pull test or five on your swedges.
     
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  13. Apr 21, 2018 #13

    don january

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    Your right on that good advice TFF. If the jaw will drill I will swag probably 10 test pieces and I have a 20 ton bottle jack and a cherry picker so getting a good pull will be easy I just need to figure a way to get an accurate number for when they do fail. This is just a brain changer to help me get time off from the Taylor-Mono build.
     
  14. Apr 21, 2018 #14

    Aesquire

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  15. Apr 21, 2018 #15

    Victor Bravo

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    You won't be able to drill the jaw, and you will probably NEVER get the drill i n exactly the right place. If you do find the actual dimension of the cutout in the jaw, the right way to do it will be spending a lot of quality time with small rat tail files.
     
  16. Apr 22, 2018 #16

    Aesquire

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    I agree on the files. Cutter blades are hardened. It's not just the diameter that makes a proper swage, it's the relief cuts on the edges of the dies. Big $300 looks like a compound cutter or $25 bolt together cheap swaging tool, there is a place for the material to go other than length ways. That reduces, but does not eliminate, the elongation of the sleeve.

    And different tools have different crush widths. And different numbers of swages per sleeve.

    I used to have a couple of wall posters with the specs, and procedures. A few moves later....



    The tricky part, where actual technique comes in, is making precise length cables, with thimbles and tangs at each end, and keeping them to tight tolerances. Jigs and practice. Lots of practice. To save money, I built jigs, bolts into carefully measured holes in the bench, with a final, and a longer ( about 4-6 inch) practice position. I'd do one end, then do the other, and measure final over all length. If I had the feel down, I'd cut off the end, and re-do the operation on the finished size jig position. ( then crank out it's matching lengths with the same feel ) This wasted a thimble and sleeve, and a few inches of cable, but made me more comfortable at keeping tight tolerances, ( plus or minus 1/16" over 30 feet ) and as close to exact matching lengths as possible.

    They use a similar jig at the hang glider factory, and usually there is one guy who specializes in making the cables, day after day, as he develops a feel that makes for precision, and less waste.

    Building at home, and doing modifications, I usually only did one glider's worth of cable work at a time, with days or weeks between work sessions, so I used the confidence building practice jig technique.

    Applications where you can use a turnbuckle are far more tolerant of overall cable length, and making matched pairs.
     
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  17. Apr 22, 2018 #17

    proppastie

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    Shameless plug....the "Control Rod Rigger" might be a good adjustable length setup tool. Two small units (or one unit cut in half) can be bolted to a table for long lengths, or a very long one could be built up...but that would not be as cost effective. Measurement (setup of tool) will only be as good as your tape measure, unless you can do better with a transit.
     

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