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fab52403

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Joined
Jul 31, 2022
Messages
12
I'm a new Wagabond builder in Virginia. Looking for advice on fuselage plans interpretation. Specifically tubes T32 and RT 32 on page 5 of the plans. Does RT32 go inside T32 to reinforce T32 where the shock strut fittings attach? Any help would be appreciated.
Fletcher
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
1,438
Location
Germantown, WI USA
Can you snap a photo of that section of the plans for us to interpret? Lots of tube/fabric experience here, but not necessarily with that airframe without a visual. Don't need the whole page (for copyright reasons), just the part in question.
 

fab52403

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Joined
Jul 31, 2022
Messages
12
Thank you Fred. It doesn't show up in the cross section view at the top of page 5, but it's called out in the tube list and shown on the bottom view. It's nice to get a second opinion. So you've been a Wagabond fan for a long time? I own a PA-17, but I want the freedom of an experimental. Thanks again!
Fletcher
 

soneraifred

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Joined
Jun 16, 2015
Messages
23
Location
Franksville, WI USA
My Wag-A-Bond has been flying for a little over three years and has a little more than 300 hours on the Hobbs. It’s great fun to fly, but keeps you on your toes on landing, particularly crosswind on pavement. I started the project in 1998 and flew it for the first time in 2019. It was not a full time project as I already had my Sonerai to fly.
 

fab52403

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Joined
Jul 31, 2022
Messages
12
My first homebuilt was a scratch built Sonerai IIL I first flew in 1984. I eventually put an A65 up front and used a 15% thick airfoil. Made a great little plane out of it. The PA-17 handles better landing than the Sonerai in my opinion. I'll be putting a C90 on the front of my Wagabond.
 

soneraifred

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Joined
Jun 16, 2015
Messages
23
Location
Franksville, WI USA
My Sonerai IIL had a mostly Great Plains 2180 VW. I thought it was easier to land than the Wag. I had to adapt to the Wag because it has the standard compression springs in the tailwheel steering. The Sonerai had a push-pull rod. The C-90 will make it a nice airplane. Mine has an O-290-G with a 74 x 47 Sensenich prop. It does like to climb. It cruises at about 103 mph at 21” mp, 2350 rpm, and 3500’.
 

fab52403

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Jul 31, 2022
Messages
12
I appreciate your insights. I bought my PA-17 a year ago to see if I really wanted to finish my Wagabond. I love the PA-17, but 12 gallons just isn't enough. Unfortunately I already covered the Wag wings and now want to figure out how to put wing tanks in without completely uncovering the wings. Any thoughts?
 

soneraifred

Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2015
Messages
23
Location
Franksville, WI USA
I have an 18 gallon Citabria fuel tank in each wing with an aluminum cover over each tank. I had to remove two ribs and install a plywood floor under each tank. An 8 gallon J-3 wing tank might be a little easier, although you’d still have to remove some fabric to do it. I‘m assuming you’d still have the fuselage tank.
 

fab52403

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Jul 31, 2022
Messages
12
The J3 tanks are what I was thinking. Use them to top off the fuselage tank in flight.
 

fab52403

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Joined
Jul 31, 2022
Messages
12
I decided to remove the 12 gal fuselage tank and install the 2 gal header tank like the plans show. This cleans up the instrument panel. I'm not impressed with the fuel plumbing drawing though. They show non vented caps and a vent line on the header going to the right tank? This doesn't look right to me.
 

soneraifred

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Joined
Jun 16, 2015
Messages
23
Location
Franksville, WI USA
The fuel tank caps must be vented. I have the type with tubes pointed into the air flow. I also do not have a header tank, just a quarter-turn ball valve for each tank mounted on the floor in front of the seat.
 

fab52403

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Jul 31, 2022
Messages
12
Maybe I should think about a pair of PA22 tanks with the diagonal brace through them. An aluminum cover on top sounds good too. Just have to figure out how to attach the covers to my wood ribs. Can you describe the routing of your fuel lines? Sorry to keep bothering you,
Fletcher
 

soneraifred

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Joined
Jun 16, 2015
Messages
23
Location
Franksville, WI USA
The fuel line routing is fairly straight forward. The line from the front tank port goes down the front of the front door post. The line from the rear port goes around the back of the D window and forward under the baggage floor and seat, and tees into the front tube. From that tee the line goes to the ball valve and then to a tee centered on the front seat. From that tee, a line goes to the firewall, thru a firewall bulkhead fitting to the gascolator. All of the lines are flared 3/8” x .035 aluminum except where connected to the tanks where I used short pieces of 3/8” automotive fuel hose.
 

soneraifred

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Joined
Jun 16, 2015
Messages
23
Location
Franksville, WI USA
As far as holding the covers down, I formed up some aluminum angles, fluted them to the rib shape and attached them with some #6 machine screws thru the gusset joints. Then, I used #6 sheet metal screws to secure the cover.
 

galapoola

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Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
200
Location
NJ
From the Wiki: The wings are the same as the Wag-Aero Acro Trainer and are built with spruce spars, wooden ribs and covered with 2024-T3 aluminum sheet.
Anyone know how the aluminum sheet is attached to the wood ribs? I often wondered if anyone was using metal to cover a wood wing, here you go.
 

Richard Roller

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Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
141
Location
Olathe, Ks.
Hard to see, the best picture I could find. Pietenpol Air Camper, N34KP. The tank bay has approximately 3/4" square pieces to the curve of the ribs glued to the ribs and the same material glued to the spars with #8 Tee-nuts inserted and glued into the strips on the lower sides.
 

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soneraifred

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Joined
Jun 16, 2015
Messages
23
Location
Franksville, WI USA
The only aluminum in a Wag-A-Bond wing is the leading edge, the trailing edge, and the aileron bay cove. The inboard leading edges are nailed to the main spar, and the outboard leading edges, the trailing edges and cove are nailed to the ribs. The ailerons also have an aluminum framework. Mine are modified TriPacer with Cub-style bellcranks.
 
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