New ultralight - tailwheel or nosewheel

Discussion in 'The light stuff area' started by Head in the clouds, May 27, 2012.

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If you built an ultralight, what kind of undercarriage would you choose?

  1. Tailwheel

    33 vote(s)
    75.0%
  2. Nosewheel

    9 vote(s)
    20.5%
  3. Monowheel

    2 vote(s)
    4.5%
  4. Tailwheel

    33 vote(s)
    75.0%
  5. Nosewheel

    9 vote(s)
    20.5%
  6. Monowheel

    2 vote(s)
    4.5%
  1. May 27, 2012 #1

    Head in the clouds

    Head in the clouds

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    The 'design a new ultralight' group need to know your preference for undercarriage, please let us know and come and visit the 'A challenge for you all' thread in the General Experimental area.
     
  2. May 29, 2012 #2

    bmcj

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    I'm a tailwheel person, but for the role of an ultralight (simple to fly for all), I voted nosewheel. Granted, tailwheel would be lighter (monowheel even moreso), but I have learned that lightly loaded tailwheels often loose grip if sideloaded and simply skip sideways. Also, for a light wingloading, you want the ground stance to have a low angle of attack to prevent it from lifting in the wind when you want it firmly on the ground.

    Bruce :)
     
  3. May 29, 2012 #3

    Norman

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    Part 103 forces a lot of bad compromises. It's herd to design something safe within those rules. Even though nose gear is heavier than dragging the tail I voted for it because crashing before you've even left the ground sucks. Also the kind of planes I like don't have anywhere to mount a tail wheel;)

    Mike Sandlin is doing something different. His new plane has two main wheels and a skid on the nose.
     
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  4. May 29, 2012 #4

    Topaz

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    Monowheel with a tail-wheel. Light as you can get, and easiest to land in a cross-wind.
     
  5. May 29, 2012 #5

    Hot Wings

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    Light as you can get, and easiest to land in a cross-wind.

    May be the lightest, but I'm thinking a bicycle gear is going to be worth the extra weight considering ground handling and should be as good or better in a cross wind.
     
  6. May 29, 2012 #6

    Vigilant1

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    Nosewheel. It's more stable, it's safer, it's what the market expects (the last big-number certified aircraft with a tailwheel went out of production decades ago). Tailwheels made sense (of a sort) when we operated from cleared fields and could TO/land into the wind consistently. Since that time--only nostalagic hangers-on unsure of their manhood have kept them around.

    Not that this is controversial . . .
     
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  7. May 29, 2012 #7

    bmcj

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    LOL. Oh wait... are you talking about me? :gig:
     
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  8. May 29, 2012 #8

    Sir Joab

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    But these are the conditions that Ultralights often operate under. My 'airport' is my inlaws' horse pasture...

    And I'm gonna take the manhood comment personally. ;)
     
  9. May 29, 2012 #9

    Vigilant1

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    I'm just stirring the pot. We've had a lot of sparks and bluster on the board lately, I'd hate to see things calm down to a state of civility!
     
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  10. May 30, 2012 #10

    Topaz

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    Didn't see too much taxiing in the ultralight ops to which I've been exposed, so I don't know how much ground handling plays in here. And I disagree about anything with more than one main being as good in a crosswind. My experience (and I've flown all three types) is that a single main with a tailwheel is the easiest type to handle in all conditions except for traditional taxiing. Again, my opinion, and YMMV.
     
  11. May 30, 2012 #11

    Dan Thomas

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    Us taildragger pilots might be unsure of our manhood, but those stuck with flying tricycles maybe have no manhood to be unsure of...;)

    Oops...there goes my man card...

    Dan
     
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  12. May 30, 2012 #12

    BBerson

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    That BLOOP is a HOOT!
    I like the nose skid. Just like I the liked the nose skid on the Schweizer 1-22, 1-33.
    BB
     
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  13. May 30, 2012 #13

    Vigilant1

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    And at YOU I blow my tricycle horn in significant irritation.:)

    Mark

    [TD="align: right"][​IMG][/TD] [TD="bgcolor: #eaeaea, colspan: 2"][​IMG][/TD] [TD="colspan: 2"][​IMG][/TD]
    [​IMG]
     
  14. May 30, 2012 #14

    Norman

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    By shear coincidence I was watching this video of Floid Fronius flying the Red Goat at Torry Pines and he blew a whistle before landing. That seems like good procedure at a crowded site.

    [video=youtube;fzNKEhVKtJA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzNKEhVKtJA[/video]
     
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  15. May 30, 2012 #15

    topspeed100

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    How about shouting FORE !?
     
  16. Jun 1, 2012 #16

    BDD

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    I vote tail dragger (could have a skid instead of tail wheel) for simplicity, lightness, reduced drag. For an ultralight motor-glider I would seriously consider a mono-wheel landing gear for further weight and drag reduction though you would need skids (which could be retractable) or wheels on the wingtips.

    As I see it, the take off and landing speeds for a legal ultralight are slow enough and the empty weight limit is restrictive enough that a tri-gear aren't needed and a tail dragger configuration should be stable, light, and easy enough to fly. Visibility over the nose also shouldn't be a problem with that configuration. I'd rather use the weight elsewhere than in the landing gear.
     
  17. Jun 1, 2012 #17

    BDD

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    That Bloop is a REAL hoot. I usually never think in terms of a biplane because of the drag. But for this, as a fun, slow way to fly.....I really like it.
     
  18. Jun 1, 2012 #18

    bmcj

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    What? Not quad gear? For that matter, no Segway gear either?
     
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  19. Feb 17, 2015 #19

    FritzW

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    There's nothing like a nose dragger to give you that ol' estrogen rush. ...and they're easier to fly when your wearing high heels.:)
     
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  20. Feb 17, 2015 #20

    JamesG

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    OTOH- ULs are very subject to crosswinds and gusts which is the main problem with tail dragger landings. It limits your acceptable windspeed envelop.

    What is the gender identity implications of the monowheelers?
     

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