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Rik-

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Edit: He's correct, if he has to go northwest from Fontana he will be in fairly high country, and 10K is not unreasonable to represent a safety margin. My previous reply was inaccurate if anyone read it in the 27 seconds it was up :)

Edit 2: Going through Cajon Pass, in a lightly loaded airplane, at the wrong time of day, or in certain weather conditions, is not advisable IMHO. Going up and over would be a better choice some percentage of the time. The boundary between the LA basin's moist cool airmass and the warmer drier desert airmass creates very significant localized instability and turbulence. When it bulges out into the Mojave desert that boundary turbulence is called the "El Mirage Shear Line", and we crazy old sailplane drivers would ride that instability for hours on end. Dealing with it at low altitude in the Cajon Pass, if you're not a sailplane pilot, might be an unpleasant experience. Early morning before all of the air starts to get active, probably not a big deal.
Good to know
 

Topaz

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... Edit 2: Going through Cajon Pass, ... The boundary between the LA basin's moist cool airmass and the warmer drier desert airmass creates very significant localized instability and turbulence. When it bulges out into the Mojave desert that boundary turbulence is called the "El Mirage Shear Line", and we crazy old sailplane drivers would ride that instability for hours on end.
Yes. The fun stuff! :D

Dealing with it at low altitude in the Cajon Pass, if you're not a sailplane pilot, might be an unpleasant experience. Early morning before all of the air starts to get active, probably not a big deal.
I've spent a fair amount of time (C-150/C-152/Tomahawk) time in the southern half of the Pass (the student practice area for Brackett [POC] is there), and unless you've got a really unstable day, I never found it to be a problem. Sure, a little bumpy sometimes, but hardly a bone-shaker. The northern end can be more active, yes, but again, I never found it to be a huge problem myself. Maybe I was just lucky to avoid any "really bumpy" days.
 

Topaz

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Rik-

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It's down in the San Diego area now, if I read him correctly. That's even closer. I'm really tempted by this airplane myself, but it's not LSA and I've no place to store it. I hope it goes to a good home. Looks like a fun bird.
You can do it.. LSA is just 1320 lbs and 120 knots.. This might fit as a DF is slow enough and light enough to meet those requirements.

You would be considered the builder as it's not 50% done yet and like Rutan did himself, define what the plane can do and then do what you wish.
 

Topaz

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The stall speed is too high on the Dragonfly. And again, I've no place to keep and work on that airplane at the moment.
 
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