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Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Rik-, Sep 17, 2019.

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  1. Sep 19, 2019 #41

    Tony Spezio

    Tony Spezio

    Tony Spezio

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    I am new to this forum Built the original Tuholer 59 years ago. It is still flying and will be at our Fly In this weekend in Flippin Arkansas 67641334_2489067397822655_1416854786908618752_n.png .
     
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  2. Sep 19, 2019 #42

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    ****...
     
  3. Sep 19, 2019 #43

    Jerry Lytle

    Jerry Lytle

    Jerry Lytle

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    I recognised the name an thought it too good to be true. Spezio Tuholer, one of my favorite designs. Welcome to the forum!
     
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  4. Sep 20, 2019 #44

    Topaz

    Topaz

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    I think the best answer I can give you is this: The Q2/Q200 is getting increasingly (now probably "very") hard to build yourself. You have to find an uncompleted (or, holy grail, not-started) kit and hope the original builder did whatever work-to-date well, and that everything's still there. Or you can try to find one that's finished and flying, but those don't come up too often, either, and same issue - how well was it built in the first place? And the other issue is that Quickie Aircraft Corporation went out of business decades ago. You're not going to find company-build-support, although there are unofficial "type groups" that can help you.

    Second major factor is that it's a design that does/did have a few issues - pretty much all mentioned in this thread - that builders liked to try to "fix". Or they want to make it go even faster. In both cases, you'll find varying degrees of competency in those fixes and mods. Finding a pristine, extremely well-built, built-to-plans example is going to be finding a needle in a haystack made of needles that were found in other haystacks. They come up, occasionally, but don't expect to see one pop up in Trade a Plane next week. You're going to have to do some (a lot of) searching.

    An airplane like the Cozy or LongEZ can still be built from plans (the "OpenEZ" plans, in the latter case), are similar to the Q's in construction and performance, and have more-active support either from the company or from larger type groups. It's just easier to build one of those.

    YMMV, of course, but that's my opinion as to why you're getting the answers you are.
     
  5. Sep 20, 2019 #45

    Rik-

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    Thanks, I appreciate your honesty.

    Wondering out loud, someone could splash a mold off a Q200 if people wanted to build them again.

    I’m more interested in flying than building at this stage, future holds? But to build one would be a goal and achievement
     
  6. Sep 20, 2019 #46

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    No, I think a lot of the appeal for the Quickie was the novelty of the configuration, and I think that the infatuation with tandem wings (and even canards) has faded in today’s market.
     
  7. Sep 20, 2019 #47

    Rik-

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    True, that and the issues mentioned have driven down demand and values
     
  8. Sep 20, 2019 #48

    delta

    delta

    delta

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    The only drawback to this wonderful machine for me is it's inability to pull negative g's. Taming the beast would probably be easier with a tail wheel and seaplane endorsment as well as a dry lake bed to learn on.
    There is a cool factor. The last time I was at Oshkosh in 2004 I had more than a few wow's and watching a guy taxie one by then take off was like... well...
     
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  9. Sep 20, 2019 #49

    Rik-

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    Please elaborate on the Negative G's. Why, why would one want or need to??

    I'll have a tail wheel endorsement soon, just gotta spend 3 hrs +/- in a CC sometime..
     
  10. Sep 20, 2019 #50

    Topaz

    Topaz

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    It's not quite as sexy-looking, but if you're really hooked on the tandem-wing configuration, you'll have an easier time finding a set of Dragonfly plans. There was a company selling them as recently as a few years ago, so the odds aren't bad of finding an unused set if you put your mind to it. The airplane also climbs better on the same power. It sacrifices a little cruise/top speed to get those things, but is no slow-coach, either.

    And, unlike the Q2/Q200, it's not molded. You can build from plans.

    3951643.jpg Dragonfly 1.jpg
     
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  11. Sep 20, 2019 #51

    Rik-

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    Thanks, after watching some video's on the University of You Tube, I came across one Genius by the name of Mike Arnold.

    He had some very interesting ideas, some that make me wonder when I see what he's saying and an example of what he's saying. Case in point he said the wing attachment point should be a flat plane for/aft as a curvature surface led to more drag. I've read the way to tell a Dragonfly from a Quickie was the flat sides on the dragonfly. Purely accidental or intentional?

    I noticed on the Lanceair Legacy that races at Reno they took some of the curvature out of the fuselage and it made an improvement.
     
  12. Sep 20, 2019 #52

    BJC

    BJC

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    A pilot who wants to be prepared to recover from unusual attitudes, for example, to recover from being rolled in a wing tip vortex at low level, needs to be able to immediately respond with the correct control actions. That requires experience with negative g flight.

    Additionally, some of us just want to fly the airplane in all dimensions.

    But not in an airplane not capable of it, please.


    BJC
     
  13. Sep 20, 2019 #53

    Rik-

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    Thanks, I didn't know if he was talking about flying inverted. One of the owners I spoke with said he rolled his plane right after he built it? Not exactly what I'm looking for but someone has to be the test pilot sometimes..
     
  14. Sep 21, 2019 #54

    BJC

    BJC

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    Most rolls in canards and tandem wing airplanes are barrel rolls, i.e., stretched out loops with no negative g.

    Negative g in those airplanes should be avoided.


    BJC
     
  15. Sep 21, 2019 #55

    Rik-

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    Please elaborate. (I don't really have any interest in aerobatics nor rolls)

    Why can the canard not be subject to negative g?
     
  16. Sep 21, 2019 #56

    BJC

    BJC

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    It can be, but they are likely to have decalage and or airfoil characteristics that, under negative g, do not not meet the canard stability and or deep stall criteria.


    BJC
     
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  17. Sep 21, 2019 #57

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    Thanks.
     
  18. Sep 21, 2019 #58

    Tony Spezio

    Tony Spezio

    Tony Spezio

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    Due to thunder storm and bad weather en route my original Tuholer will not make it here. Hopinh for better weather tomorrow.
     
  19. Sep 21, 2019 #59

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    To elaborate on BJC’s post, canard stability is accomplished by having the canard stall before the main wing, thereby keeping the main wing from stalling. This is typically done through the proper choice of loading, airfoil, and incidence. When you go negative, you negate the airfoil and incidence safeguards (the loading remains the same), and you stand a chance of stalling the main wing first.
     
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  20. Sep 21, 2019 #60

    Rik-

    Rik-

    Rik-

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    Thanks, that makes it more understandable. I guess with proper training and experience you can recover from a stall.
     

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