New Sonex High Wing Design

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Vigilant1

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Well we'll just have to see about that but you're correct ... it does appear that is what it is. I did see this that shows some numbers (subject to change of course):

View attachment 114698
As far as the specs, it seems to be a 120% scale Sonex. Wingspan, wing area, gross weight, minimum HP: all are about 20% larger than stock Sonex numbers.

I think it will be popular. I'm glad to see this from Sonex, I was under the impression that their jet and any government work was their focus, to the exclusion of the small stuff. I'm sorry to see their newest plane doesn't have a VW option, but John Monnett may yet give us an extended wing/folding wing mod for the existing legacy/Ver. 2 Sonex airframes. I don't know that, but would like it.
And, not to forget, the VW powered Sonerai family is still being offered by Sonex.
 

vhhjr

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I'll bet Tundra tires will be an option!

Vince Homer
 

rv7charlie

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I'm considerably smaller than the old FAA 'norm' (~150 lbs), and I still find the Sonex cockpit a bit too cozy for two.

The logical market is the typical Bubba'd-Up American. As a culture, we're a bit taller than 50 years ago, and about twice as wide. Then there's the fact that Bubbas and older pilots struggle to get in (and more importantly, out) of low wing a/c where you must climb down to get in and climb back up to get out. High wings are just easier in the in/e-gress areas. The market is, well, bigger.
 

pylon500

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Just based on observations but;
Do they really need dihedral on a high wing?
All the junction work to get that little bend add a surprising amount of weight to the spar.
Bede got away without dihedral, although to be honest, the wing does dihedral in flight...
If you look at the Tailwind video, you realise the only wing related thing going through the cockpit, is one steel tube in the roof.
It would take an engineer to crunch all the number for comparison, but while a single strut might knock 5~10kts off your top speed, your payload would go up significantly (and you could put in dihedral without thinking about it)
As for control layouts, as an instructor, I've had to climb in and out of planes enough to know that twin sticks are a pain in the butt, to say nothing of how awkward it is to do stuff (maps etc) in your lap with a stick there. I've also never been a great fan of steering wheels in aeroplanes, so my 'goto' trainers have usually ended up with some form of centre stick.
Our own Aussie Lightwing;
Lightwing_cockpit.jpg
And the now popular Foxbat (with a Y stick);
Foxbat-cockpit.jpg
Yeah, I know, no-one's going to use a Hinex(?) as a trainer.
 

TFF

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Definitely head to head with normal 2 seat RVs which will put it in the ballpark sakes wise for the new RV.

How much dihedral is perfect is different than useable. Perfectly flat wing may or may not have enough. Depends on how much roll you want with the yaw and how much adverse yaw the ailerons make and how much pitch coupling the yaw makes. I had an RC plane that had horrible pitch couple to yaw. Rudder made the plane pitch down bad. Not enough dihedral. I added some winglets which got rid of most without having to take the wing through a bandsaw. Except for aerobatic planes, most tend to require attention to keep coupling at bay in all axis. You have to handle ease of build to ease of flying. Better flying tend to have to get all angles where they need to be. Easier building is hoping there are no angles.
 

BJC

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Do they really need dihedral on a high wing?
Dihedral can help ease wing fuel tank venting as well as reduce the amount of unusable fuel.
I've had to climb in and out of planes enough to know that twin sticks are a pain in the butt,
My airplane has side-by-side seating with two sticks. If the sticks are causing one a pain in the butt while entering / exiting, then one is not using the proper, and easy, technique.

BJC
 

Pops

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My Falconar F-12 had a center stick. The problem was it also had a center flap handle between the seats. So it bothered a lot of people switching the left hand over to the right center stick so they could use the right hand on the center flap handle. No problem , I never knew I was doing it.
 

Victor Bravo

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A center stick is convenient for sure, but it likely deprives at least one of the occupants from using their preferred hand to fly it. If you have a right-handed instructor and a left-handed student... then no problem. If you have two right-handed people on board then one of them is going to have a harder or less intuitive experience. Yes I know we RH pilots are able to fly our Cessna style yokes with the left hand, but if you have a stick in the airplane then you should be able to fly it like a stick.

Getting in and out of the airplane is not as important as how it flies and how much you enjoy it once you are in it.
 

TarDevil

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Getting in and out of the airplane is not as important as how it flies
There are circumstances where getting out would be more important than anything!
But I understand your intent. I personally would prefer two sticks. I don't think it's that much of an impediment and would enjoy having the stick where it feels natural.
 
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