New GE 1300hp 3D printed turboprop improves efficiency by 15% while reducing complexity

Discussion in 'Aircraft Design / Aerodynamics / New Technology' started by Doggzilla, Jul 31, 2019.

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  1. Jul 31, 2019 #1

    Doggzilla

    Doggzilla

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  2. Jul 31, 2019 #2

    litespeed

    litespeed

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    Gotta love modern tech.

    But being a pessimist, I bet the don't reduce the price to reflect the manufacturing cost.

    But great anyway.
     
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  3. Jul 31, 2019 #3

    Speedboat100

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    Really cool !
     
  4. Jul 31, 2019 #4

    BJC

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    Why should they?


    BJC
     
  5. Jul 31, 2019 #5

    proppastie

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    I think they mean the mockup is 3D printed. ....not the real engine......still an interesting way to check the drawings (3d model ).....especially for the guys from marketing that can not read a drawing.
     
  6. Jul 31, 2019 #6

    radfordc

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    Read the article and it's clear they will 3d print the actual engine.
     
  7. Aug 1, 2019 #7

    Doggzilla

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    Ya. With 15% fuel savings they kinda earned whatever extra profit they can make from them. Probably have to sell a hundred to even make back the investment.
     
  8. Aug 1, 2019 #8

    Doggzilla

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    And yes, they can 3D print high temp metal components now. SpaceX uses several in their reusable rocket motors.

    I’m not sure which type they use, but they can actually sinter metal powder with a laser. That’s becoming fairly common for Aerospace companies now.
     
  9. Aug 1, 2019 #9

    proppastie

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    True...but my understanding is these parts are not highly stressed,....I did not read the article very close, but the obviously plastic pipes, instead of SS sort of gives it away. Do you think they will 3D print the whole engine.
     
  10. Aug 1, 2019 #10

    proppastie

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    If this is what you are referring to: "GE was showing off a full-size mockup of the all-new engine entirely 3-D printed."

    It is not clear to me that it is the mockup or engine that is entirely 3-D printed, but I am old and easily confused.
     
  11. Aug 1, 2019 #11

    Sockmonkey

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    They are 3-D printing the actual engine.
    Gas turbines are so thirsty that a 15% improvement is a pretty huge deal.
     
  12. Aug 1, 2019 #12

    Doggzilla

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    Most likely the casings and ducts. The accessories will just be standard off the shelf most likely.

    The reason SpaceX rockets are so much cheaper than standard rockets is because instead of milling structural parts out of thick plates they use “additive” manufacturing to 3D print cross members onto thinner plates. So I’m assuming that’s what they are printing here as well.

    And the reason it looks odd is because that’s a sales mockup. You can see what looks like an airshow in the background.
     
  13. Aug 1, 2019 #13

    BJC

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    From the linked article:

    BJC
     
  14. Aug 1, 2019 #14

    Doggzilla

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    Ya, and it’s not entirely from the 3D printing. The new single crystal blades are far higher efficiency as well, so it’s a cumulative effect.
     
  15. Aug 1, 2019 #15

    proppastie

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    Not sure what that is...I must really be out of the loop...They are not machining blades but growing them?.....If they can 3-D print the castings and ducts that is impressive. I would think they could have all internal passageways instead of all those pipes....
     
  16. Aug 1, 2019 #16

    proppastie

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    Would like to see this if you have a link.
     
  17. Aug 1, 2019 #17

    Sockmonkey

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    The atoms of metal in conventional alloys are arranged in lots of tiny little substructures, which means the areas between those substructures are weak spots where cracks can form and propagate.
    Single crystal means arranging the atoms as one big structure
     
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  18. Aug 1, 2019 #18

    MadRocketScientist

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    One video I saw mentioned that Spacex was using an electron beam process for their 3D printed parts. The first I had heard of that!
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2019
  19. Aug 1, 2019 #19

    tspear

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  20. Aug 1, 2019 #20

    litespeed

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    Why should they make it prices lower?

    To reflect the cost of manufacturing, just like space X has done. Just like the development costs would have been lower.

    The benefits of the 3 d process are best spread around in increased profit but also lower cost.

    Space X would be no where if it charged the same per flight as legacy rockets.
     

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