New FAA Regulation

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Winginit

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[FONT=&quot]New FAA Regulation / Part 0, Section 000 (a) 1 (c)
[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]
Section I: No pilot or pilots, or person or persons acting on the direction or suggestion or supervision of a pilot or pilot may try, or attempt to try or make, or make attempt to try to comprehend or understand any or all, in whole or in part of the herein mentioned, Aviation Regulations, except as authorized by the administrator or an agent appointed by, or inspected by,
the Administrator.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Section II: If a pilot, or group of associate pilots becomes aware of, or realized, or detects, or discovers, or finds that he or she, or they, are or have been beginning to understand the Aviation Regulations, they must immediately, within three (3) days notify, [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]in writing[/FONT][FONT=&quot], the Administrator.[/FONT]









Section III: Upon receipt of the above-mentioned notice of impending comprehension, the Administrator shall immediately rewrite the Aviation Regulations in such a manner as to eliminate any further comprehension hazards.
Section IV: The Administrator may, at his or her discretion, require the offending pilot or pilots to attend remedial instruction in Aviation Regulations until such time that the pilot is too
confused to be capable of understanding anything.







 

Victor Bravo

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Believe it or not, the majority of the FAA regulations (formerly FAR's, now 14 CFR's) are indeed founded on solid common sense, and are there for the right reasons.

I'm not saying that 50+ years of typical government bureaucracy hasn't over-complicated it and created plenty of flaws (it has), I'm saying that the reason behind the rules, and why the rules say you can or cannot do something... are built on common sense and sincere pursuit of public safety in the vast majority of instances.

I know this from having gone through FAA certification for design, function and manufacturing. I also cannot speak for anyone else, but the FAA people I worked with during that process were 1000% above boards, helpful, fair, knowledgeable, and supportive of what I was trying to accomplish. This may or may not mirror other experiences that people have had.

Are there petty, egomaniacal, or uninformed FAA people out there? Of course, just like police, fire, and other government people. But it's a better system than many people give it credit for. And what's even more encouraging is that in recent times they are willing to re-examine and re-assess their rules, and even change their methods once they have solid and defensible data to base those changes on. Being a government bureaucracy, these changes are slow (LSA/Sport Pilot, PBOR, Part 23 rewrite, 43.13 rewrite), and they take a good push from advocacy organizations to get through. But the pathway and machinery to make those changes are there.

Here in California pulling a permit to add a room onto your house, or a variance from building codes, makes FAA certification look like childsplay.
 

bmcj

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Apr 10, 2007
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Fresno, California
I agree that the core of the FAR is common sense, and they were clear and easy to understand 40 years ago, but they have become confusing and convoluted with new categories/classifications that make research and understanding difficult, and sometimes today's content can seem contradictory or variably interpreted.
 

BBerson

Light Plane Philosopher
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Dec 16, 2007
Messages
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Port Townsend WA
Believe it or not, the majority of the FAA regulations (formerly FAR's, now 14 CFR's) are indeed founded on solid common sense, and are there for the right reasons.

I'm not saying that 50+ years of typical government bureaucracy hasn't over-complicated it and created plenty of flaws (it has), I'm saying that the reason behind the rules, and why the rules say you can or cannot do something... are built on common sense and sincere pursuit of public safety in the vast majority of instances.

I know this from having gone through FAA certification for design, function and manufacturing. I also cannot speak for anyone else, but the FAA people I worked with during that process were 1000% above boards, helpful, fair, knowledgeable, and supportive of what I was trying to accomplish. This may or may not mirror other experiences that people have had.

Are there petty, egomaniacal, or uninformed FAA people out there? Of course, just like police, fire, and other government people. But it's a better system than many people give it credit for. And what's even more encouraging is that in recent times they are willing to re-examine and re-assess their rules, and even change their methods once they have solid and defensible data to base those changes on. Being a government bureaucracy, these changes are slow (LSA/Sport Pilot, PBOR, Part 23 rewrite, 43.13 rewrite), and they take a good push from advocacy organizations to get through. But the pathway and machinery to make those changes are there.

Here in California pulling a permit to add a room onto your house, or a variance from building codes, makes FAA certification look like childsplay.
Seattle FSDO told me they do not inspect and issue EA-B airworthiness certificates anymore.
 

Pops

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The last time I got a homebuilt inspected was in 2007, I had my airplane inspected by the FAA from a neighboring state. This state's FSDO said don't even ask. There is no DAR in the state. I called a DAR from another state and he told me that it would be $500 for each visit and there would be several visits. I should have the JMR ready for inspection in a few months, looks like I'll have to truck it to another state. Things sure have changed. Thanks for all the good work in Washington, EAA & AOPA.
 

Winginit

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Maybe the current administration will also have time to simplify and or rid the aviation universe of excessive regulations and employees as is planned for other agencies.
 
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