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new engine supplier: based on suzuki engines

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AdrianS

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Joined
Jul 5, 2014
Messages
571
Location
Australia
Monty, thanks for the firsthand report. Maybe I didn't sufficiently caveat my post. I'm not a Megasquirt basher, I wish them success. But, as you point out, anybody counting on that system to keep their airplane aloft needs to go in with their eyes wide open. They need to not only know stuff, but "know what they don't know." And, IMO, that includes an understanding of the software architecture used in Megasquirt, which is the only way to appraise its stability and response to various sensor failures (none of us can hope to accumulate enough time in our own car to find the failure modes that may occur in an airplane, though it looks like you are doing your part!). As a user, is it possible to "engineer" a Megasquirt system? I don't mean install various bits and make sure they run, but look at the source code and truly understand what is happening inside the black box?

Mark
I looked at the megasquirt code for a car project over 10 years ago, and wasn't super impressed with the code quality.
It read as if written by an engineer with some coding experience, but it didn't feel professional*.
They also had more trouble with VR sensors than I was happy with - which was a concern as I wanted to use the factory cam & crank sensors.

It may well have improved since then.


* Part of my job is programming micros for real-time industrial control; incidentally, we use VR sensors for speed detection.
 

AIRCAB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2015
Messages
89
Location
Vancouver Island
I believe they're produced in a few different factories. IIRC, Mark told me he prefers to order parts individually so that he can mix and match the parts he prefers in his engine builds. I believe that what he said was that that all parts are not equal and vary depending on the factory.

In other words, he doesn't buy engines. He begins with parts, and the resulting engines are unique to his shop.
Buying bare blocks and building up from their would be very time consuming!
 

AIRCAB

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Joined
Feb 6, 2015
Messages
89
Location
Vancouver Island
Yes it is! We also do some race prep like deburing, radiusing and crank polishing and this adds even more time.
So you are saying that the factory crate engines from the joint venture in India have inferior parts, and you source individual parts from many vendors, then to assemble into your engines ?
So you are saying
 

aeromomentum

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Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
128
Location
Stuart, FL USA
So you are saying that the factory crate engines from the joint venture in India have inferior parts, and you source individual parts from many vendors, then to assemble into your engines ?
So you are saying
Suzuki, like every other car company, sources their parts from all over the world. Less important is the country of origin than the quality control of Suzuki. While I am sure some great Suzuki parts come from India there are also some counterfeits. Some of the "factory" crate motors that I have seen seem to be made from second quality parts and maybe are back door specials. Currently the only parts we source from India are the Suzuki radiator overflow tank.
 

Victor Bravo

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HBA Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
8,015
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
I remember reading some little blurb a while back that as a promotional demonstration (pronounced "publicity stunt") some guy from Ford put an Ecoboost engine block in his carry-on luggage on a flight somewhere ??? Could they have done that stunt with a cast iron block, or was that an aluminum prototype?
 

TFF

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Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
13,776
Location
Memphis, TN
Honda Formula 1 V6 engines were cast iron in the Late 80s. Essentially the blocks were rotary molded. Just as light as aluminum and ten times the cost. They did win.
 

hangarrat101

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Messages
22
Location
Kent, South-East England
I've been following Aeromomentum for a while, and generally I've been really impressed! I notice the website makes mention of a couple of new engines, the AM20 and AM24. Where are they in development, and when is there likely to be more info released? I'm also interested to hear about progress on the AM20T, and curious what boost and RPM you need to run it at to generate the high power from such a small displacement.
 

aeromomentum

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Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
128
Location
Stuart, FL USA
I remember reading some little blurb a while back that as a promotional demonstration (pronounced "publicity stunt") some guy from Ford put an Ecoboost engine block in his carry-on luggage on a flight somewhere ??? Could they have done that stunt with a cast iron block, or was that an aluminum prototype?
A specific cast iron block can be lighter than another specific aluminum block but that is normally not the case. There are also huge differences in aluminum blocks and total engine weights. In any case the advertised dry weight of the 1.0 ecoboost is 213lbs. For a comparison our base engine for the 100hp and 126hp AM13 starts out at 171lbs and we reduce it to about 150lbs before we add the gearbox (16.3lbs), etc. This makes me think that the 1.0 ecoboost is over 40 lbs heavy for the power but it is hard to know for sure since it may not be a direct comparison.
 

aeromomentum

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Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
128
Location
Stuart, FL USA
I've been following Aeromomentum for a while, and generally I've been really impressed! I notice the website makes mention of a couple of new engines, the AM20 and AM24. Where are they in development, and when is there likely to be more info released? I'm also interested to hear about progress on the AM20T, and curious what boost and RPM you need to run it at to generate the high power from such a small displacement.
The AM20 and AM24 are based on the same engine family as the AM20T so will fit most of the same conversion parts. The AM20 base engine is almost exactly the same externally as the AM20 base engine so this will happen soon after the AM20T. The AM24 base engine has a few changes so require more time. Once these versions are in testing we will add more information.

At 260hp and 6000 rpm the boost is about 14.8psi on the AM20T.
 

alr

Active Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2004
Messages
37
Billski or anyone else, does anyone know what engine the 75 hp AM10 is based on? It appears to be different from the others.
Based on the bore and stroke it is probably based on the Daihatsu 1KR series of engines, such as the 1KR-FE and 1KR-VET. Those engines are used in a variety of models from several manufacturers, though most seem to be from Toyota. (Daihatsu is owned by Toyota.)

What puzzles me is that the Aeromomentum website lists the AM10 as 85 HP at 6000 rpm, but none of the naturally aspirated versions of the 1KR series that I can find on the web come close to matching that horsepower rating. (The 1KR-VET is rated at almost 100 HP, which is more than 85 HP, but that version of the engine is turbocharged.)

Also, some information lists the AM10 at 75 HP at 6000 rpm (which seems almost believable to me, though even that is higher than other naturally aspirated versions of the motor) and some lists it at 85 HP at 6000 rpm (which is hard for me to believe.) I am not aware of any naturally aspirated 1.0L motor that achieves 85 HP. On the other hand, there is a video on youtube which documents ~85 HP for the Aeromomentum engine, so it is all very confusing to me.
 
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