Name the plane.

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
9,516
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
I'm dumbfounded Matthew. There are probably 20 of us here on this forum who were used to being "the guy who can identify strange airplanes", but it's safe to say you're in an entirely different league if you are actually familiar with all of these insanely obscure flying machines.

The airplane in Post 140 above.... I can't even find where the engine(s) would be mounted, and it's far too draggy to be any sort of an attempt at a glider. I'm not even up to the level of being stumped.
 

Riggerrob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Messages
2,082
Location
Canada
I'm dumbfounded Matthew. There are probably 20 of us here on this forum who were used to being "the guy who can identify strange airplanes", but it's safe to say you're in an entirely different league if you are actually familiar with all of these insanely obscure flying machines.

The airplane in Post 140 above.... I can't even find where the engine(s) would be mounted, and it's far too draggy to be any sort of an attempt at a glider. I'm not even up to the level of being stumped.
The engine was mounted amidship and turned a pair of propellers via shafts or belts. The props rotated between the two wings.
 

cluttonfred

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
8,547
Location
World traveler
Thanks much, VB, I am flattered! I suspect that my esoteric knowledge comes from having strange tastes and once I leave those niche areas I start to flounder. One of those areas is, of course, strange European homebuilts. ;-)

I'm dumbfounded Matthew. There are probably 20 of us here on this forum who were used to being "the guy who can identify strange airplanes", but it's safe to say you're in an entirely different league if you are actually familiar with all of these insanely obscure flying machines.

The airplane in Post 140 above.... I can't even find where the engine(s) would be mounted, and it's far too draggy to be any sort of an attempt at a glider. I'm not even up to the level of being stumped
Riggerrob is absolutely right, in fact, you can clearly see the two blades of a small wooden prop behind the upper wing.

The engine was mounted amidship and turned a pair of propellers via shafts or belts. The props rotated between the two wings.
 

cluttonfred

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
8,547
Location
World traveler
The mystery plane is...a Starck AS.37! André Starck (French aeronautical engineer and father of the architect and industrial designer Philippe Starck) began experimenting with a narrow-chord, narrow-gap, staggered biplane concept developed by Yugoslav aerodynamicist Miroslav Nenadović (often Romanized as Nenadovich or Nenadovitch) back in the 1930s. His AS.20 was actually captured and tested by the Nazis when they occopied France during WWII.

After the war Starck continued to develop the concept with the innovation of joined wingtips. Not obvious in the photos are that the end plates are mounted at about a 45-degree angle and include the ailerons. The AS.27 was a racing biplane with a conventional tractor engine, the AS.37 featured a centrally-mounted engine driving pusher or tractor props on each upper wing and I believe there was even an attempt to sell an upgrades model as a very light counterinsurgency aircraft.

I don't know more about the pros and cons of the wing setup but I will do some digging when I get a chance, I believe that there is a "slot effect" argument which helps the combination to keep flying at high angles of attack. I am not as interested in the dual remote props but it's easy to see how the wing arrangement could be advantageous for a very small aircraft or perhaps for STOL use. Some additional info and photos here, though most of the source material is in French: André Starck Aircraft And Projects

Starck also designed some very conventional aircraft which were built in modest numbers by homebuilders, but where's the fun in "conventional"? ;-p

EDIT--I have not yet found the original papers, which appear to have been published in French back in the 30s, but here is an excerpt from a Master's thesis that summarizes the "Nenadović effect". I find this very intriguing.

Nenadovitch effect from Bourbon thesis.png

Starck_AS-20_right_photo_L'Aerophile_April_1943.jpg SMFcN_VVSb_1Yx1Mx8ZtOCBMsHntDeF-BxTQKnkZvA4.jpg

Starck AS-37.jpg starck as 37.jpg as 37.jpg

Here's another one...any takers?

View attachment 111478
 
Last edited:

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,870
Location
Fresno, California
Here's another one...any takers?

View attachment 111478
I’ve seen that before (in photos and articles. IIRC, it had a single engine driving pusher props off the trailing edges of the front (upper) wing, and the prop arc sat behind the front wing and ahead of the rear wing. The articles were about various designs that ran a prop in a slot in the wing.
 
Top