Name for an ultralight design

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Which name(s) do you like best?

  • Tiger Budgie

    Votes: 4 66.7%
  • Mako Canary

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Zanonia Raptor

    Votes: 2 33.3%
  • Tiger Budgie

    Votes: 4 66.7%
  • Mako Canary

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Zanonia Raptor

    Votes: 2 33.3%

  • Total voters
    6

Winginit

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Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Messages
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Location
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Well, I didn't want to do this because I'm afraid someone will steal my idea and make A MILLION DOLLARS! But since you asked:

View attachment 63624 View attachment 63625

Now that's a name! :lick:
What type of paint scheme do you plan to use ? From the side view it has some resemblence to old WW2 fighters with the three piece canopy.
If you go with a fighter theme, that usually implies a name that strikes some fear into people....like Spitfire. But then there is always the exception, like Sopwith Camel.

If you are going with a non-military theme, my suggestion is "Butterfly", because they fly slowly and "flit" about, landing whenever and wherever they choose...and look beautiful while doing so. Then there is the story of Papillion and his determination to overcome any problem and continue on.
 

Swampyankee

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Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
1,441
Location
Earth USA East Coast
The designer of the Spitfire hated the name, thought it dumb. Just goes to show that talent in one area doesn't necessarily shine in another. ( I love the name )

The Brits, as a security measure, used names instead of number/letter designations from before WW2 for public announcements. So the enemy wouldn't know it was the 4th version when they announced the factory was setting records.

The U.S. uses names for PR purposes, but the pilots use either the official code or part of it, or occasionally one they came up with themselves and don't care if the Brass likes it. No one outside an airshow announcer uses "Fighting Falcon" for the F-16. For pilots it's either "16" or "Viper". ( from Battlestar Galactica. Which really dates the airplane ) I've also heard "Delta" for a "D" model, etc.

The Brits and the Germans has us all beat when it came to cool names for war machines in general. We built the "General Sherman" tank, The Germans the "Panther", the Brits the "Matilda", "Challenger", "Comet". Same with airplanes. Even Ship names tend to be cooler for British ships, although names like Destiny might give a sailor a moment's pause, and the names like Obdurate make it easy to make fun of British ship names in fiction........ like Inconceivable or Vainglorious.

I do like both of the first 2 names.

How about....?

Thunder Finch

or

Desperate Flycatcher?


I don't think it was "security" -- "Gnatsnapper" doesn't tell me any more or less about an aircraft than "P-12" -- but it was public relations. There were actually rules about how the RAF named aircraft (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_military_aircraft_designation_systems). The US didn't; I don't know whether it was actively forbidden or whether it was just that most of the manufacturers in the US didn't name their commercial aircraft (DC-3, 247, M130, S44), but more of the British manufacturers did (Ensign, Calcutta, Argosy, Empire). Interestingly, the country that used the most similar designation system to the USN was probably Japan, and the USSR used one similar (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovie..._designation_systems#Pre-war_Soviet_System)to the USAAC/USAAF system, although by the late thirties the USSR shifted to the same sort of system as used by the other Continental powers.


...hmmm...."Gnatsnapper" might be a fun name for an ultra-light, especially if it's got bigger sibling called "Flycatcher...."
 
Last edited:

Aesquire

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2014
Messages
3,243
Location
Rochester, NY, USA
I had a Wills Wing Duck.

Named I was told during a discussion over beverages after work. It seemed all the cool bird names were taken, Falcon hawk eagle harrier kestral condor...... and the company's previous craft had the less than thrilling but descriptive name XC.

So they went to first principles. What's it for? Cross country? Ok, what birds migrate?

Thus..... Duck. Well aware of the lack of martial glory in that name they doubled down with a logo on the sail of a silhouette of a duck with webbed feet in landing mode. ( made ironic by the glider's later rep as a hard to land machine )

The improved competition version was not the Duck 2, but the Attack Duck. Some had sidewinder missiles added to the silhouette.

There have been much worse nicknames. The Lawn Dart and Baltimore ***** come to mind.

Thanks Choppergirl for those links. I had no idea that the Airbus 320 was so beloved.
 
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