My project update (picture!)

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Captain_John

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Feb 3, 2003
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699
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Hey all,

I have made some good, steady progress and have recently passed a milemarker. When you build an RV, you start off with the tail and wings, then you build the fuse upside down on stands. When it is all riveted together you flip it (the canoe) right side up.

I just did that this past Halloween and am now working on decking it out. Here is a recent pic:



This project has been humbling and very educational. I am glad to be roughly in the middle of the learning experience!

:) CJ
 

smoore

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Mar 30, 2007
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87
Location
Lakewood, CO
Flipping deserves a banana!

:ban:

I'm going to take it as a good omen that your "flipping" post was post #666 for you... you'll "work like the devil" to complete it?
 

Captain_John

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Joined
Feb 3, 2003
Messages
699
Location
KPYM
Flipping deserves a banana!

:ban:

I'm going to take it as a good omen that your "flipping" post was post #666 for you... you'll "work like the devil" to complete it?
HA!

The Devil made me do it!

I guess one more "flipping" post will change that!

:roll: CJ
 

wally

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Joined
Mar 31, 2004
Messages
932
Location
southwest TN.
Looks vry nice.

What are those little rods sticking out all over? Are those to hold the tubing in alignment so you can weld it together?
LOL, Best wishes!
Wally
 

Captain_John

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Feb 3, 2003
Messages
699
Location
KPYM
They are called clecos. A cleco is a tool that goes in place of a rivet to temporarily hold sheets of aluminum (or any material) together while fabricating the parts and surrounding area.




Here is the link from Aircraft Spruce:

http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/sheetholder.php

You use special pliers to insert these clecos into place and they hold very securely! Here are the pliers:



They are essentially split wedges. Here is a cross sectional view:


They are absolutely indispensable!

:) CJ

P.S. Wally, I apologize if you were seriously inquiring. I thought you were just kidding. There is no welding on these planes. Virtually everything is riveted together like a certified plane. If you look at the rivets in a Beechcraft or most any other metal plane, these are just like those.
 
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