My library is complete! What am I missing?

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Foundationer

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With the arrival of Hiscocks I now have all the books on designing aeroplanes I need! So what am I missing? What do I need to get next? Probably something on composites and ABD matrices?
It'll not be too long now till I've got the basic design fleshed out so I'll have to start soliciting advice on something serious...

IMG_20180312_202558.jpgIMG_20180307_205117.jpg
 

cluttonfred

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I like David Thurston's DESIGN FOR FLYING and DESIGN FOR SAFETY more for making you think about alternatives than as design references. Evans and Fike design handbooks are handy.
 

fly2kads

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As a bibliophile with a nerdy streak, I scoff at the notion of a library being complete! That book by Hiscocks is one of my favorites.

The FAQ in the composites section has a list of useful books, if you've not seen it yet. I can't speak to which of those would be a better starting place.
 

Foundationer

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As a bibliophile with a nerdy streak, I scoff at the notion of a library being complete! That book by Hiscocks is one of my favorites.

The FAQ in the composites section has a list of useful books, if you've not seen it yet. I can't speak to which of those would be a better starting place.
It arrived today! I will be having a proper look this week - didn't know there was a composites section yet.
 

plncraze

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I second BoKu's suggestion of the Stan Hall book. I believe now it is two volumes. Hall was a homebuilder and Lockheed engineer. His work is priceless to the beginning amateur.
Get a copy of Evans' Lightplane Designer's Handbook. Comes with a set of Volksplane plans I believe. William Evans was a stress analyst at Convair for 30 years. He took a couple of years to design the first VP.
 

Chris In Marshfield

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Raymer has a bigger book than the one you have that has a lot more detail about the design and iteration process. It even takes weapons systems into account. :)

When I was reading the book, I made my wife simultaneously laugh and roll her eyes when I told her I was just going to skip over the cost estimation section.
 

mcrae0104

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Raymer has a bigger book than the one you have that has a lot more detail about the design and iteration process. It even takes weapons systems into account. :)
Bottom row, second from the right :)

Foundationer--great start! I wouldn't worry much about what to get next--just focus on figuring out what's most important to read first then focus on getting through what you have. I tend to buy more books than I can possibly read.
 

Chris In Marshfield

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Aircraft Structures - David J. Peery (the Dover 2011 Reprint or the 1950 original) is definitely worth having.
That one is available as an eBook as well. I have that one on my iPad. You know, for spur-of-the-moment reading. Ya never know when the mood strikes.
 

pictsidhe

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I was going to suggest Peery, but saw Bruhn. Some seem to think Bruhn is the better book. I don't have Bruhn. I do have numerous Dover books. They are great value.
 

PiperCruisin

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Bruhn is good, aero guys live by it, but search for the errata and index to make it more useful.
As a Mechy I like Timoshenko as well as Shigley and Mishke.
 

wsimpso1

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Agree with the above, articularly the notion that no library is ever complete.

Also, wise to add:

Riblett (airfoils);
Both of Pazmany's books (airplane design and landing gear);
All four Bingelis books (building);
Either Tsai and Hahn or Jones (composites).

Billski
 

BJC

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Not a design book, but a practical guide for Lycoming type engine installation, is Dave Prizio’s Powering Your Plane. Dave is a homebuilder.


BJC
 

Foundationer

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Bruhn is good, aero guys live by it, but search for the errata and index to make it more useful.
As a Mechy I like Timoshenko as well as Shigley and Mishke.
Isn't "mechanics of Materials" by Gere / Goodno is the same as the Gere / Timoshenko book?

I bought the bigger Raymer book second hand off Amazon and the ratty ex library copy that turned up was from my old University so I probably actually borrowed that very copy back in the late nineties. Small world and that.

I'll look into the rest of them too - thanks for the suggestions.
 

Mad MAC

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While I admit to never meeting an aerospace textbook I didn't like :)

I personally use the rule of three i.e it works best to have at least 3 books on each subject because when you can't understand something the 2nd books tends to add to the confusion and the 3rd a bit of clarity.

Niu's Airframe books are good as they tend to have more words in them than the equivalent section is bruhn. Roskams books shouldn't be under rated (although they don't seem popular with the home building lot).
Stinton's Flying Qualities and Flight Testing of the Airplane is quite insightful.
 
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