Mountain plane

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Pops

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Old friend of mine's wife was a student pilot ( latter become a great flight instructor) was doing touch and go's and got carb ice in the C-200 in the C-150. Engine quit at about 300' on take-off and she did a great job of going over a low place in the tree tops and making a field inside the Kiser Aluminum plant outer fence. We saw it happen and jumped in a car and drove down to the plant lower gate and the guards let us in as they arrived. Water still dripping from the carb. State police showed up and we ask if they would let us load the C-150 on a roll-back truck and haul it back to the 1/2 mile to the airport. Told us he would be back at 8 AM in the morning and if he wasn't there, just stop traffic and get it done. He never showed up. Wings high enough to miss the road signs and we got it back with zero damage.
She had been trained flying a Cherokee 140 with a Lyc engine and used old habits.
 

Pops

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"Back in the day" (O-320H2AD single drive magnetos) I flew several C-172's off county roads during a/c recovery. The local sheriff deputies would block the road for me.
I have 1k + hours flying behind one of those engines and never trusted it. Only problem was vacuum pump failure in hard IFR, and a electrical failure from a broken alternator wire at 12K with center over the mountains.
 

Richard Roller

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When that engine came out we had 7 172's on lease back with that engine. For the first year we were lucky to have 2 flying at any time. Regulator problems with the new 24 volt system, numerous mag problems (points, capacitors, distributor bearings, plug leads, etc.), lifters, rocker shaft studs, oil pumps. That engine was a mess. I remember at least three cases where one of the points capacitors would fail and weld the point set shut, it would cause so much heat it would melt the cam follower on the other points and it would get VERY quiet! People didn't want to fly them. We had 2 172's with the old engines and we were doing 100 hr. inspections on them every 10 days.
 

Pilot-34

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Sorry, but if he was told to remove it, why was he ticketed for removing it?
Generally speaking there isn’t a crime without intent (or gross negligence)
This seems to be far to complicated for some cops to figure out.
 

TFF

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AD was an apt name. I know where one is sitting on a pallet. Ford 351C valve train originally. Someone put in the effort to STC a roller cam conversion just to have it all disappear. For a homebuilt what is the most discouraging is they don’t cowl well with stock stuff. If you are an engine guy, adding roller rockers and the roller cam conversion and EFI would fix it all. For a while Lycoming would take one in core trade for just about any engine. They have done a job trying to erase it from the Lycoming public memory.
 

Richard Roller

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A friend of mine put one in a Hatz back in the middle 90's. Twenty years after my time to work on them. His did okay as far as I know. I still wouldn't trust one.
 

Pops

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First two in my area didn't last 100 hrs. At the Lyc museum several years ago and they had every engine they had built except for the 320-H2AD. I ask why. Said they didn't make that engine with a smile.
 

TFF

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If it had been a success, most engines today would have been that design. You could change conical to dynafocal by unbolting the ears and changing to the other. There were obscure constant speed versions. Less pieces.
 

Pilot-34

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I read that before and found it interesting but it really does concentrate on just the cam issue everyone talks about.
I’d like to know more about how much money was actually saved in the building that engine and all the other issues it created.
When I listen to people talk about that particular motor you would swear everything from the throttle cable to the drain plug was ruined because they saved a nickel on the ID plate.
 

TFF

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Cam guard additive was invented to try and save the cam before they ended up designing new lifters that required taking the engine apart to fix. The engine is a two piece case; the accessory case is cast into the main case. Oil pump was external, which in its self is pretty handy, but they got some design part wrong and they had oil pressure problems. Fuel pump and a boss for a prop governor is at the front and sits high. Makes low cowls a problem. Duel mag. Two mags in one. One side breaks, trash takes out the other. I think the carb did not have an accelerator pump. It really was rushed to market and because it was at the height of aircraft sales, it really had no time to shake out the issues. 4-5 years and it was gone. They don’t make many parts for them so if you tie your self to one, parts will run out.
 

Pops

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I was flying a 1977 and a 1979 C-172 with the H2AD engines. Both airframes had high times and don't know how many engines. I do remember taking a trip in the 79 when just put back in service with a new overhauled engine.
 

Dana

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He did not disassemble it: he trailered it intact, and far exceeded the load width limitation.
When I had my accident (in NY) the state park officials demanded that the plane be removed before sunset, and the local cops (one of whom was my next door neighbor at the cabin) escorted us the three miles or so down to the road to where I'd arranged to leave it until it could be disassembled. Fortunately the road was wide enough.

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