Modern day "motorcycle of the air" aircraft class?

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Sockmonkey

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For whatever it may be worth to the sketchers and dreamers and SolidWorks artists... I humbly suggest that before you invest any time or money into a 1+1 airplane, make a plywood mock-up of the cockpit or cabin and sit in there with your significant other, or friend, or main squeeze, or grandkids, etc. and determine whether you could actually fly safely.
This is why I always give give my single-seater designs a fuselage/cockpit width of at least 75 cm just to be sure of elbow room when enclosed.
 

cluttonfred

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If you were really going with something like this, would conventional controls make sense or something more motorcycle-like? I have seen a prone pilot design that used “handlebars” for all three axes (left-right for roll, fore-aft for pitch, rotate for yaw). That could be neat with a twist throttle and hand brake.
 

Tiger Tim

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Honest question: while I see a “motorcycle of the air” as being light, simple, and fun, a lot of posters have been pretty obsessed with including motorcycle features like wheels in line, handle bar steering, and an airframe that you straddle while leaning over. Why is that?
 

FritzW

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while I see a “motorcycle of the air” as being light, simple, and fun...
I think "light, simple and fun" covers too much of the airplane spectrum. To me a “motorcycle of the air” is also small, maneuverable, STOL and maybe foldable.

I don't think it needs in line wheels, a handle bar or straddle and lean forward but the novelty of those features narrows the spectrum. I'm a little obsessed with straddling the fuselage, for a lot of reasons, but that's just me.
 

ScaleBirdsScott

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Cuz they (we I guess) want literally a flying motorcycle and not just an airplane with some sort of notion of a the motorcycle ethos and nothing else.

I want a random 10 year old kid from off the street to see one take off at an airshow and think "flying motorcycle!" otherwise mission not accomplished.
 

erkki67

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I think "light, simple and fun" covers too much of the airplane spectrum. To me a “motorcycle of the air” is also small, maneuverable, STOL and maybe foldable.

I don't think it needs in line wheels, a handle bar or straddle and lean forward but the novelty of those features narrows the spectrum. I'm a little obsessed with straddling the fuselage, for a lot of reasons, but that's just me.
Then we are at least two 😋
 

erkki67

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816AA5B3-A12B-4D84-8891-895CDC03A81C.jpeg
This is the Just103, a good looking single seater.
The cockpit section could be built up like the Belite Aircraft, basically 2 routed Aluminium honeycomb panels joined by 5 honeycomb joiners. This way the cockpit could be built in a day without the controls. Honeycomb structures are tough. Jim Bede built the Nugget with a similar concept, I saw it once at Oshkosh I believe. The tail cone could be built up like the Affordaplane or a bent Sheetmetal u channel build up. The tailsurfaces could be again routed honeycomb panels. The most time consuming would be the wings build up, but I like the idea of Metall wings, like the use of icp Savannah Wings, 72liters Fueltanks included or if one tank removed 36liters almost 10 US Gal .
 

saini flyer

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I think "light, simple and fun" covers too much of the airplane spectrum. To me a “motorcycle of the air” is also small, maneuverable, STOL and maybe foldable.

I don't think it needs in line wheels, a handle bar or straddle and lean forward but the novelty of those features narrows the spectrum. I'm a little obsessed with straddling the fuselage, for a lot of reasons, but that's just me.
So not like this:
cycle assembly 1.jpg
IMG_9997.jpg
DSC00026.jpg
 

cluttonfred

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Fritz, the RW9 is pretty cool just the way it is, but yes, what I had in mind was something between an RW9 and a de Pischoff using an exposed fuselage frame of large aluminum tubes like the Super Floater glider, but in a ride-on style where the bent tubes form the backrest/rollbar for attaching a seat harness and maybe the cabane for the upper wing but the pilot stills straddles the single tubes that form the main fuselage truss.



Saini flyer, you can't tease us like that, tell us more! And in terms of style, the late Richard Vogt would have loved it! See his Hamburger Flugzeugbau (Blohm & Voss) Ha 137 is below. I am curious about the choice of the cranked wings, though. Usually, shorter landing gear is part of the justification, but clearly not in this case.



Uhhhh... Saini... what's that ????
 
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