Model A Ford Engine for Aircraft

Discussion in 'Ford' started by spduffee, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. Apr 13, 2015 #21

    don january

    don january

    don january

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    spduffee: See what you can find out about the Funk airplane powered by a 4 cylinder ford the plane was built in 1938 and the engine in 1928, both plane and engine were certified. There is so many newer engines to pick from I personaly would forget the old ones and search Corvair, Volkswagon, Mazda rotory, even these engines have been around quite some time. the model A engines were heavy and the print for conversion I have is near 80 years old and in todays safty standereds I would'nt bolt one to my plane inless your building a hanger queen. Don
     
  2. Apr 13, 2015 #22

    cheapracer

    cheapracer

    cheapracer

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    I seen what ya done there! :gig:

    Being an Oorstralian, as to his "location" I would add; Where? (Tasmania, an island, is often left off a map of Australia!).



    I am Groot ...

    Donovan Engineering Model-D Block
     
  3. Apr 13, 2015 #23

    revkev6

    revkev6

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    as I said back in the begining of this thread.... unless you absolutely need the look the model A is not a reliable engine. I own a 1928 and a 1932 ford... i drove a flathead to work today! I would NEVER get in an airplane that had a model A engine. I use the V8's in cars... no 4 bangers. the guys who try to get more power out of a model a in a car don't usually get much more than 10-20k miles out of the bottom end. that's in a car. you start putting higher compression and better breathing intake and exhaust on these motors and the babbits can't take the abuse. bottom line is you end up with an engine that makes in the 50hp range but weighs 300-350 lbs and is built from components that are 85 years old!

    the donovan block is EXPENSIVE! solves many of the issues with the engine though.
     
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  4. Apr 14, 2015 #24

    starlord

    starlord

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    Thanks Rev Kev, this is why I posted the previous questions. I like the idea of a stable and slow machine that is gentle to fly, however the problem I see with the pietenpol is the ford engine, it is heavy for the power and not a reliable engine in this day, the idea behind this aircraft was to use a power plant that is easy to get and easy to repair. this is the reason I am asking questions about the model a engine and the pietenpol.
    Some more?'s
    So the weight is around 350 pounds.
    1. Since the prop is bolted to the crank, how fast can I turn it (maximum)and how big is the prop on the pietenpol?
    2. What weight can the pietenpol carry in the engine bay?
    3. Has anyone looked at using diesel engines in a aircraft?
    Thanks
    Tasmanian James
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2015
  5. Feb 16, 2018 #25

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

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    spduffee, starlord.
    I'm new to this site. I have just stumbled on to it. I realize this is an old thread, but I thought I'd put some info on it just in case anyone is still reading it.

    I fly Ken Perkins Piet N34KP. Some of you may have seen it at the Brodhead fly in. I may have given you a ride! Here is some Pietenpol info. Ken's engine with oil and water and an Ole Fahlin prop weighs 256.3 lbs. The engine has shell bearings on all main and connecting rods. It puts out about 60 h.p. with a 5.2 : 1 compression aluminum head. The a/c typically cruises between 70 and 75 mph. The a/c weighs 667 lbs. empty, with oil and water. Ken used a gross wt. of 1150 lbs. I weigh just over 200 lbs. and I've flown a large (280 lbs.) passenger with 1/2 fuel on board ( 6 gals.). It was a leisurely climb, but climb it did. I was more worried about getting the passenger into and out of the front cockpit than anything else. It is difficult getting into and out of the front cockpit.

    If anyone has any more questions, drop me a line.

    Richard 17_orange_piet.jpg IMG_0400.jpg
     
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  6. Feb 16, 2018 #26

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

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    One more thing. I thought I'd mention that Ken's Piet has been flying since 2000.
     
  7. Feb 16, 2018 #27

    Swampyankee

    Swampyankee

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    The Continental A-40, an O-4 engine, was first produced in 1933.

    I think a better retro look would be one of the inverted in-lines.
     
  8. Feb 16, 2018 #28

    BBerson

    BBerson

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    Welcome to the forum.

    How annoying is the open exhaust? Is a low compression engine not as loud as high compression?
     
  9. Feb 16, 2018 #29

    TFF

    TFF

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    I think it's more about opinion that it's either music to fly behind or annoying. You will hear the engine.
     
  10. Feb 16, 2018 #30

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

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    I don't notice the engine so much. It's more of a rumble than a bark at cruise. We cruise it at 1900 to 2000 rpm. Wind noise of course.
     
  11. Feb 16, 2018 #31

    cheapracer

    cheapracer

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    It is what it is for the owners reasons, but I would take the option of a VW Golf Diesel, or similar diesel, for the same weight and power to end up with the same sort of period sound and feel, a bit of smoke even, but with cross country bulletproof reliability.

    But that's me.
     
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  12. Jun 28, 2018 #32

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

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    An update on Ken Perkin's Pietenpol. The model A started the first time in 6 years this last Monday, the 25th. I've been working on reassembly the last few months. It started on the first pull with a hot mag. Runs very smooth. One more step on the road to airworthiness.
     
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  13. Jun 28, 2018 #33

    rbrochey

    rbrochey

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    Congrats! FYI if you know anyone else who might like to fly behind a model A, I have two blocks for sale. Nice work!!
     
  14. Oct 8, 2018 #34

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

    Richard Roller

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    Ken's Piet has flown! I moved it to my hanger three weeks ago, a short flight. I've flown it 2 hours since. It run very smooth. So far so good.
     

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