Mitchell Wing B10 - England

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AncientAviation

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
49
Location
England
Greetings all...
I thought I'd say hi and share a little of my current project I'm working on.

I purchased the B10 plans years ago as a student and started working on it when I got a job offer in the UK. Turns out, I love the place and never left!

Finally had a bit of time and money so back to step #1 and starting the build all over again.
Most of the metal work for the wing has been done - although it needs to be bent, drilled and reamed still...
The small bit of steel work has not been started but it is fairly small

Just started on the wood... or rather turning wood into sawdust!
A vacuum cleaner is high on the list!
Made 2 practice ribs and then first actual rib made...
Would hope to get the rest of the ribs done in the next couple of weeks...
Then the challenge of making a tapered spar - wood rough cut but haven't quite figured out best way to go about this yet...

Some pics of so far... my sawdust, the spruce I have and my garden shed..

Changes intended to make are to add spoilers, 2x small wing based fuel tanks and a slightly different cage as not sure I would fit or be able to get in and out of the cage as per the plans.

As an aside... I tried the two local wood glues but didn't like them that much. Using Epidermix 372 from ABE chemicals which is great stuff... Had to get it smuggled over here...
~Craig~
 

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AncientAviation

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
49
Location
England
There are 4 main spars for the inner wing section and I have been putting these off for a while. It has actually been fairly straight forward in the end.

The beams of wood cut and then planed. Then the spars marked out given the imperfections in the wood. I wasn’t expecting this step but happy with how little wastage of wood and quality of spars.

First time using theRyobi cordless planer and after a quick test on some scrap ended up trying to plane the spars. Amazing how the right tools save so much time!

There is still a slight bit more to do before starting the outer wing spars - or chopsticks as they should be called because you probably won’t be able to tell the difference between chopsticks and these super thin spars!
 

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AncientAviation

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
49
Location
England
All ribs finished... took far longer than I could have imagined. Glad most were built before winter kicked in. Small garden shed made out of fencep panels worked but got super cold!

Spars all done... really enjoyed that. Had to figure out how to hotwire which was fun (I can do it but don't know what I am doing yet!)

Metal work largely done - needs to be bent, drilled and reamed...

Next onto the nose ribs...
 

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Joined
Sep 30, 2020
Messages
23
Nice work! I'm 50 now and I remember a Mitchel wing doing a demo at a fly in in Porterville, Ca when I was maybe 5 years old. I thought it was awesome 😊

I worked in the UK for a few years...but sadly, unlike you I didn't fall in love with it...having come from Japan...which I did love...but happier now back in the states with an actual airplane I can fly.

Lots of great airplane history, museums and resources there though...I did get a chance to fly a Chipmunk while there...just couldn't deal with the weather. Fly safe, when you can😉
 

cvairwerks

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Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
340
Location
North Texas
Used to work over on Carburton St, real close to the Oxford Circus. Enjoyed it and would like to take the family over for a long trek thru England, Ireland and Scotland. We have family in Ireland that are 14th generation on the same farm.
 

rivilee

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Joined
Jul 22, 2014
Messages
70
Location
Tullahoma, Tennessee
Looking good! Sorry I didn't see your thread earlier.
Are you going to do the strengthening mods that Finland (?) required in the center section?
Also, looking at some of the older B10's, I've found that bugs/rodents like to mess with the foam in the D tube. Wonder if there's a way to prevent that.
 

AncientAviation

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
49
Location
England
Looking good! Sorry I didn't see your thread earlier.
Are you going to do the strengthening mods that Finland (?) required in the center section?
Also, looking at some of the older B10's, I've found that bugs/rodents like to mess with the foam in the D tube. Wonder if there's a way to prevent that.
I thought it was Sweden - but your guess is about as good as mine!
Yup, they had 3 mandatory mods... 1 was don't drill through the main spar at the front to attach the hang cage. That makes a whole lot of sense!
They did require a whole lot of extra stiffening at the centre section... I've never understood why. Only seems to be on top of the wing to... a while off this but was planning on adopting some / all of it... :)

Thanks for the pointer..
 

Jsample40

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Joined
Jan 18, 2020
Messages
83
Location
Western North Carolina
Looking good! Sorry I didn't see your thread earlier.
Are you going to do the strengthening mods that Finland (?) required in the center section?
Also, looking at some of the older B10's, I've found that bugs/rodents like to mess with the foam in the D tube. Wonder if there's a way to prevent that.
Regarding your experience with "bugs/rodents messing with the foam" in the Mitchell Wing B-10 D tube... I just discovered that it also happens in the Mitchell Wing A-10 D tube and other portions of the wing. The A-10 has structural foam thru out all segments of the wing and outer wing sections. Living in the midst of a forest as we do in Western North Carolina, I was recently startled to see the interior of my A-10 wing being chewed up for foam pellets that the mice build their winter nests with.... Damnnnnnn!!!! I had to bring it inside our basement garage to prevent further damage to the very structural integrity of the wing. Additionally, I had to develop an overhead means of suspending and rotating the wing to allow replacement of the "munched foam" via "Great Stuff" can foam. One can only emplace it when the area to be refoamed is positioned lower soas to allow the foam to settle into the chewed out depressions, versus sagging from gravity. Once dryed, use a bread knife to trim off excess foam. Works great. Use the denser GS foam, not the soft, non-expandable variety.
Jay Sample
Also fabricate & install removable end caps for the open ends of both the center section and outer sections. Thin aluminum or clear thin lexan works great.
 

AncientAviation

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
49
Location
England
Regarding your experience with "bugs/rodents messing with the foam" in the Mitchell Wing B-10 D tube... I just discovered that it also happens in the Mitchell Wing A-10 D tube and other portions of the wing. The A-10 has structural foam thru out all segments of the wing and outer wing sections. Living in the midst of a forest as we do in Western North Carolina, I was recently startled to see the interior of my A-10 wing being chewed up for foam pellets that the mice build their winter nests with.... Damnnnnnn!!!! I had to bring it inside our basement garage to prevent further damage to the very structural integrity of the wing. Additionally, I had to develop an overhead means of suspending and rotating the wing to allow replacement of the "munched foam" via "Great Stuff" can foam. One can only emplace it when the area to be refoamed is positioned lower soas to allow the foam to settle into the chewed out depressions, versus sagging from gravity. Once dryed, use a bread knife to trim off excess foam. Works great. Use the denser GS foam, not the soft, non-expandable variety.
Jay Sample
Also fabricate & install removable end caps for the open ends of both the center section and outer sections. Thin aluminum or clear thin lexan works great.
Any chance you could post some pics of that and your plane please? :)
Did you wish it had airbrakes by any chance?
 

Dennis K

Member
Joined
May 23, 2014
Messages
24
Location
Portsmouth, NH USA
Mice enlarged a doorbell wire hole into my basement and chewed up the servo wiring threaded thru the wing ribs while nesting in a number of quarter scale model wings suspended from the ceiling. Little bastards must have been doing the Goldy locks thing until they found the "just right" one.
 

Jsample40

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Joined
Jan 18, 2020
Messages
83
Location
Western North Carolina
You might want to consider an electronic rodent repeller.

I now use one every fall when I visit the NC and GA mountains to protect the wiring in my vehicles.


BJC
We have two electronic rodent repellers in our residence in NC. They do not deter the little "varmits" to any extent. However the small green poison pellets which come in tubs from feed & supply stores work great. Makes them desperately thirsty to find water, outside the homes.... then they die!
JWS
 
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BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
Messages
14,306
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
We have two electronic rodent repellers in our residence in NC. They do not deter the little "varmits" to any extent.
The one that I have stopped them from damaging my vehicle’s wiring. The range, however, is limited. Mine covers a fan shaped area with an arc of 90 degrees and a range of about 15 feet. Might take two for a Mitchel Wing.
However the small green poison pellets which come in tubs from feed & supply stores work great. Makes them desperately thirsty to find water, outside the homes.... then they die!
JWS
Lead poisoning works, too, but takes additional delivers systems and skills, plus it carries the risk of collateral damage.


BJC
 

AncientAviation

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
49
Location
England
Got the spars at the required 6 degree dihedral and attached the fittings. Most holes were drilled already although I left a few to drill once measured as I was told the holes need to be at least 2x diameter of bold hole away from the edge... so about 12 or 13mm fir a 3/16" bolt.

There should be a 1/4" bolt at the joint and I was told it might be better to use 3/16" hole for now and then at the time it can be enlarged and reamed to 1/4" at final assembly - thus compensating for any misalignment. Well, all in all took about 4.5 hours of careful measurement and drilling and at the end the joint holes line up perfectly. Kind of wish I had gone for the 1/4" hole in the first place I guess.
 

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