me 109 build

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Tiger Tim

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Joined
Apr 26, 2013
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3,047
Location
Thunder Bay
I am in Belleville, ON. now. Very few (only one) builders around down here.
Oh nice, I spent a summer in Belleville when I got my glider license. Being so close to Trenton, there are surely some homebuilt airplane builders scattered around the Air Force base. Have you looked into COPA and RAA chapters nearby?
 

Victor Bravo

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Jul 30, 2014
Messages
6,764
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
Looks like a Marcel Jurca 109 from the size of it...

I'd go with a little washout, backed up by stall strips on the inboard end of the wings. If the combination does not give you a gentle enough stall break, you can always add a little more washout using "poor man's washohut" (raising the ailerons slightly with rigging). But there are far far FAR more experienced aero guys here than me.
 

TerryM76

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HBA Supporter
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Sep 8, 2012
Messages
561
Location
Tempe, AZ
Slats would add weight and complexity......

The 109 is my absolute favorite aircraft from WW-II.
 

raymondbird

Active Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
31
Location
Belleville, Ontario Canada
3/4 scale Marcel Jurca design yes. No slats but 3 degrees of washout. Should stick to the plans but slats sure look so good and do give a higher cl max I believe. Would that make up for their weight and trouble . . . ?
 

ScaleBirdsScott

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Feb 10, 2015
Messages
1,137
Location
Uncasville, CT
I would think unless the Jurca wing is exactly scaled from the original's proportions and airfoils, would the slats even be valid? You'd have to totally re-engineer the wing design to account for them I imagine.
 

Radicaldude1234

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Joined
May 30, 2009
Messages
387
Location
Front Range, Colorado
The slats on the Bf-109 were activated by the changing position of the center of pressure, which moved forward when the angle of attack increased. The low pressure on top of the wing literally "sucked" them out. In theory these would be automatic and open at specific angles of attack and therefore airspeeds.

Neat concept, but in practice the slats had to be meticulously maintained. If one jammed and the other didn't, irrevocable loss of control could be expected. British test pilot Eric Brown (world record holder of having flown the most types of aircraft) HATED the things, as uncoordinated yaw could open the slats independently and spoil a shot in a dogfight (though that was a good thing for Allied pilots). That didn't matter too much to Luftwaffe pilots, whose doctrine was to stay fast if possible and stay at speeds where the slats didn't open.

The concept made it's way to the Me-262 with its high wing loading and, because it was heavily influenced by the Messerschmitt design, the early models of the F-86. On the Sabre though, I'm not too sure, but there were provisions for both the slats to open at the same time. Some later models of the Sabre, designed after combat experience in Korea, reverted to a fixed leading edge and deleted the automatic slat.
 
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