Mazda Rotary Engine

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Starflight

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It might be that they have all been removed from the aircraft involved. These engines consume excessive amounts of fuel for the power produced, and a lot of that fuel is not properly combusted and winds up unburned in the exhaust system where it can ignite and set the vehicle/airplane on fire.
 

narfi

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It might be that they have all been removed from the aircraft involved. These engines consume excessive amounts of fuel for the power produced, and a lot of that fuel is not properly combusted and winds up unburned in the exhaust system where it can ignite and set the vehicle/airplane on fire.
I am pretty interested in these engines and have read a lot about them.
Could you link me to a few with these issues you quote so I can read up more on them and what people with those issues have done to prevent them from happening again.

Disclaimer: I have caught a continental in a certified aircraft on fire before.........(long ago when I was younger :p )
 

RSD

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It might be that they have all been removed from the aircraft involved. These engines consume excessive amounts of fuel for the power produced, and a lot of that fuel is not properly combusted and winds up unburned in the exhaust system where it can ignite and set the vehicle/airplane on fire.
Do you have any links to cases where the plane being ignited by a Mazda Rotary has occured?
 

Starflight

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My experience is based on race cars, where their exhaust systems frequently ignited the vehicles before they could finish the race. Those race teams were also granted a 50% excess fuel quantity allowance in their pits. Heat issue? BE VERY CAREFULL WHERE ALL THAT HEAT WILL GO!
 

Bill Welter

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Jun 10, 2019
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On aftermarket ECUs for aircraft use, there is a mixture adjustment. On run-up, set the RPM at 4000, hold the brakes and adjust the mixture lean until RPM drops, then richen until it perks up, then a bit more rich. Just like a piston engine. Don't set the mixture to "long flames on takeoff" to impress your friends. The pipes are very short about 18 inches, and no muffler usually. Use 321SS, should be good
 

Lendo

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Starflight, your information on Rotary in racing Car applications do not apply to the Rotary in Aviation use.

1. The Rotary can be run very lean (no valves to burn) and just as economical as any other aircraft engine.
2. Th RPM of a Rotary in Aircraft is run approx 6,000 rpm, which is the RPM that has the least stress on the Engine, compared to Racing Car RPM up to 12,000 rpm. At 6,000 rpm the Rotors are only running at 2,000 rpm with the engines 3:1 reduction within it's gearing. In my mind that similar to a Long Stroke reciprocating engine at it's most comfortable rpm.
3. The RX 8 side exhausts allow unburnt fuel to be carried into the next combustion event, swept up by the Apex seals.
4. Peripheral Exhaust Ports do allow unburnt fuel to be burned in the exhaust, but to my knowledge it has only resulted in overly hot exhausts - hence the need to run Stainless Steel exhaust pipes, which to my knowledge most aircraft use.
5. There are many Rotary engines in use in Light Aircraft use. Without lighter end and middle housings, there may not be a lot in Light Sport Aircraft- however this will happen.

I hope this clarifies those points.
George
 

thjakits

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IIRC - peripheral exhaust (...and intake!) would be superior to side intakes - IF layed out purpose specific!
Going for all out race dimensions (max power at 12k rpm and basically useless at and below 6k rpm) is of course detrimental. You would need to calculate exact sizes and locations for the ports....
IF you run a turbo, you still can harvest some of the exhaust burn....

thjakits
 

Urquiola

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Aug 23, 2013
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Peripheral Intake Port has the best top power results, from higher Mean Effective Pressure, but at low rpm, and low load, part of mix having entered working chamber returns to intake duct, and too much mixing of exhaust gases into the intake stroke exists. PP is good for power applications, such us motrocycles, aviation, rtacing, while Side Intake Porting is better for idle and street cars. No one has tested, as far a I know, the combination of Peripheral Intake and Side Exhaust, the Renesis has both intake and exhaust side ports, Would a PIP and SEP be the best? Someone willing to test this? Thanks. SE McGovern -RCE Periph Intake Port vs Side IP.jpg plugs-in-side-housing5.jpg E McGovern -RCE Peripheral Exhaust Port vs Side EP vs Exhaust BackPressure.jpg Sachs KC-27 con agujero de bujia modificado -pat Kawasaki .jpg alut +
 

xwing

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Just read the other day here, a main player retired, that turned into probs with what used to be easy availability of solid good to go PSRUs
 

Lendo

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X-wing, was that a question? might you be speaking about Tracy Crook, if so that would be so, but there are other PSRU's out there and some in development. If your reading these comments you will pick up on who can supply.
George
 

Neil Unger

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Oct 27, 2019
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Already done in oz. I myself have 2 and there are a number of others. No problems to date,
 
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