Maybe the best UL wing design ?

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rotax618

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Boorabees were plans built, they were all different, reflecting the owner’s requirements, they used different powerplants, generally the empty weight of the MK2 was between 180-240kg, MTO was 544Kg (Amateur Built limit). Some were 2 seaters. Powerplants R503,R582,R618, Jabiru, HKS.
 

rotax618

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The plans wouldn’t be of any use to you unless you could borrow the moulds, the plans and use of the moulds was free to those people I thought would complete the project. Alas the main 5” tube is no longer available in 6061t6 here in OZ, and I believe it is very hard to get in lengths over 12’ in US. The drawn 40 and 44mm tubes were unavailable here for a long time, but I see you can get them again now - It was an good airplane for its time, I’m too old and tired to provide the builder support needed so no more will be built. You are welcome to any of the ideas.
The tubular mainspar and glass fibre ribs in not my idea, Col Winton and his son Scott (of Facet Opal fame) used this method on may of their designs.
 

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My computer froze yesterday so will try to finish today!
Norm Barnhardt and Jim Maupin were founders of DSK (Duster Sailplane Kits} the above were NOT original designers , original designer was Ben Jansson with design improvements by Hank Thor which was the BJ-1 dyna mite and DSK had distribution rights and Jim Maupin made improvements and designed Woodstock One, Carbon Dragon,Windrose and Windrose II. There is written reports Volmer Jensen made a deal with Norman Barnhardt to sell VJ23-24. This was done while Allen Craft was president of DSK. Rod Gage enters picture as VP of DSK an Rod Gage did own "Sun Fun Power Glider" and may have been a dealer when joining DSK. However, in the early 80's @ Bakersfield Farm Flyin I asked Volmer Jensen if he had any input on development @ DSK and/or Rodney Gage and he replied NO. He did state he and Rod belonged to the same EAA chapter.

As to ownership. etc. I purchased all parts and tooling that I wanted! Did not desire cage (fuselage) parts as I knew welded cage would be lighter and better for future production. Parts that I did not purchase went for scrap except 12-15 Solo engines but I was aware where they went. I was not interested in any patent and/or copy right material and wanted "arm length" transaction to avoid any legal ramifications that may have occurred @ DSK.

As I had lots of experience with the Honcho and was responsible for all the early upgrades. Even thought Rod and I had our differences I felt the design of the wing was a masterpiece in the 80's and feel the same today. Yes a lot of pieces all stamped, match role drilled which makes a strong light weight wing(s) approximately 32 feet and 32 pounds and I have read published reports and Rod furnished me information and pictures of 4.50 plus and less than 2 negative @ useful load a 500 pounds @ gross or less. Remember the cage was NOT BUILT for large or obese pilots. Most Honcho's were able to make the 254 weight limit. How many other could?
 

WINGITIS

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Wellington, New Zealand
The Boorabee is similar to a RESURGEM II...

Another cool Australian design...but not as nicely rounded as the Boorabee.

Theres one for sale in NZ at present for 2K NZD, BUT A LOT OF WORK WOULD BE REQUIRED....

 

TLAR

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T46craft

Do you have any drawings of the wing?
I would like to have a set.
Better yet, would you share any information to the home built community.
I’m sure this design would improve ultralight safety
 

WINGITIS

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The plans wouldn’t be of any use to you unless you could borrow the moulds, the plans and use of the moulds was free to those people I thought would complete the project. Alas the main 5” tube is no longer available in 6061t6 here in OZ, and I believe it is very hard to get in lengths over 12’ in US. The drawn 40 and 44mm tubes were unavailable here for a long time, but I see you can get them again now - It was an good airplane for its time, I’m too old and tired to provide the builder support needed so no more will be built. You are welcome to any of the ideas.
The tubular mainspar and glass fibre ribs in not my idea, Col Winton and his son Scott (of Facet Opal fame) used this method on may of their designs.
Here is a rather nice Boorabee for sale here as well...


8K NZD.
 

rotax618

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This method for building wings has been used here in OZ for over 50 years to my knowledge, the leading edge is usually fibreglass made in a mould, the Wintons made the leading edge mould using rib shaped ply cutouts lined with either sheet metal or Formica/Laminex, the Boorabee mould was from fibreglass using a plug. Col Winton made the ribs from chopped strand/polyester resin, the Boorabees were cloth/epoxy reinforced around the edges with carbon tape, some even had a sealing foam glassed into the outer edge.
The rib plugs from which moulds were taken are routed out of MDF and coated with bog(bondo), a left and right mould was required (could lay up 2 left and 2 right ribs in a day.
Col Winton used 32mm tubes for the top bottom chord and rear spar ( the extrusion was called rope rail and was one of the few 6061t6 extrusions available here in OZ) the Boorabee has 40mm top/bottom chord and 44mm rear spar, it is drawn tube 1.6mm wt. (much harder than extruded tube).
the shear plates are 1.2mm 6061t6 sheet with the edges folded for stiffness, they were fixed hit/miss between the ribs excepting the root/tip & spar attachment where they are both sides of the spar tubes. I used extra bluefoam nose ribs hot wire cut in-situ to stiffen the leading edge skin.
 

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I have received several request for plans and picture of the Honcho wing. In "The Light Stuff" April 8, 2018 is a picture of the Honcho wing. If you search the internet you will find 8-1/2 x 11 reduced size copies of the wing. Do I have plans, etc of course I do - but they will only be shared with person or persons purchasing my inventory. You would not expect me to furnish for free what I expended good money for, would you!
 

Dillpickle

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Piny Woods, Tx
This method for building wings has been used here in OZ for over 50 years to my knowledge,...
This is awesome information you are passing on. Thank you! Couple of questions--did you sleeve the spars anywhere, how did you work the root spar attachment, are the spar webs pop-riveted with stainless steel pops, and is the fiberglass d-tube leasing edge a significant portion of the wings strength, or is the d cell there to keep torque in check? And did you form the spar webs with a press or a brake? Do they curve around the spar?

Everybody is lamenting the lack of spruce, but there is no reason that a wing like this couldn't be fitted to many styles of ultralight construction. And frankly, the Honcho wing as built isn't quite strong enough for a 250 fat boy and an overweight airframe. A buddy asked me to fly his Rans stinger. I did without asking empty weight....after a nerve wracking flight, I found its empty weight to be over gross! And I'm...not svelte.
 

rotax618

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There is no telescopic size for the 40mm tube so I had to turn down some thick wall tube to make the sleeves, there were sleeves wherever a bolt passed through the tubes, at the root, where the strut/compression fitting was bolted through both bottom chord and trailing edge tubes.
3/16” stainless rivets were used.
The Boorabee had 2 struts and the wings were torsionally strong, but the leading edge added considerable extra torsional strength (a belt and braces approach). The Winton and McCarron wings only had one strut, the spar was further aft (closer to the centre of lift), they got all of their torsional strength from the leading edge.
The spar webs were bent in a vice using a simple folding tool that consisted of three sheets of alloy bolted together so as to form a slot the depth of the fold, the edges of the tool were rounded so as not to stress the edge of the fold. The webs only curve slightly around the tube (refer to the drawings above) - it is most important to make sure the rivets go throught the centreline of the tube or it will roll inward or outward, changing the spar height.
Most of these aircraft were originally built to ANO 95.10, an Australian exemption from strict airworthyness requirements, max empty weight was 150kg and wing loading was 15kg/m2. The Winton Jackaroo was 112kg empty weight, I built a no frills Boorabee weighing 148kg.D7269DD4-6747-4580-BCFF-D53E8C0AC92A.jpeg
 

Dillpickle

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There is no telescopic size for the 40mm tube so I had to turn down some thick wall tube to make the sleeves, there were sleeves wherever a bolt passed through the tubes, at the root, where the strut/compression fitting was bolted through both bottom chord and trailing edge tubes.
3/16” stainless rivets were used.
The Boorabee had 2 struts and the wings were torsionally strong, but the leading edge added considerable extra torsional strength (a belt and braces approach).
Got it! I built a Sport Hornet and put a Jabiru 2200 on it. The wing would have been difficult and "futzy" to build from scratch. The wing was very strong even without a D-cell. It was a single strut wing and had drag and anti-drag tubes throughout. Your rendition is far more suitable to a home builder.

As always, when we see good ideas, the mind wonders about all the new possiblities. A simpler wing rib mold might be made without rib stiffeners, then use Boku's method of a half foam rod glassed in place. Let me ask...with all that has changed, what would you do different on the wing?
 

rotax618

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The Winton ribs were flat, being laid up with chopped strand glass gave the stiffness but not a lot of shear strength. You could lay in some foam gap filler rod around the edges of the ribs between cloth layers to stiffen the rib flange, without adding much weight. After you make the ribs (4/day) you can build a wing in a few hours. Make a simple mould and experiment.
The Boorabee is a very simple airplane, but building even a simple aircraft is a non trivial exercise.
 
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