Malaysian airlines missing plane

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by oriol, Mar 12, 2014.

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  1. Nov 4, 2016 #481

    Himat

    Himat

    Himat

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    The trouble is that we will probably never know what happened to this flight. As time go there is less chance to retrieve data from the flight recorders if they are found. More pieces of the plane will probably be washed up on some shore, but to find larger pieces would be sheer luck.
     
  2. Nov 4, 2016 #482

    StarJar

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    Oh we'll find out. Them boxes is waiting with chips and the info for 1000 years.
     
  3. Nov 5, 2016 #483

    davidb

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    Sure, you could modify an aircraft for skydiving or remote control. How likely is it to do this to an airliner in commercial service without any trace of the work involved? It would involve much more work than "tampering."
     
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  4. Nov 5, 2016 #484

    Vigilant1

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    Heck, it's nearly impossible to find a drive that can read a 5 1/4" floppy disk anymore, and if one could be found, the code couldn't run on a modern machine. If the flight data recorders aren't found soon, advancing technology will make them as useful as a TDK audiocassette with a program written in CPM to run on a Commodore 128.
     
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  5. Nov 5, 2016 #485

    davidb

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    By design, the pilots can always override any automated control or navigation function. I don't know what hackers could do given enough time and resources but part of the plan would have to eliminate the pilots. Even with today's increased security, it must still be much more feasible to high jack an airplane with traditional methods rather than some dreamed up tech method. I'm 100% sure of my opinion--a high jacking by a non-crew member is impossible if all protocols are followed.
     
  6. Nov 5, 2016 #486

    Vigilant1

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    Well, just to say it, a hijacking by anyone has always been impossible if all protocols are followed. But in the real world we can't get bad guys to follow them, and good guys sometimes don't either.
     
  7. Nov 5, 2016 #487

    davidb

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    The oxygen fire theory is not as improbable as you think. The course can be accounted for by pilot actions accomplished before incapacitation. The fire would have been localized and the damage selective.
     
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  8. Nov 5, 2016 #488

    bmcj

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    But how long did the plane fly after the initial trigger event? There are suicide by airline cases where the pilot decided to disable the crew and fly the plane longer than the cockpit voice recorder loop length so that it would erase all evidence of their misdeeds by recording over it. Of course, that method would it be used by a terrorist because a terrorist wants his deeds to be known.
     
  9. Nov 5, 2016 #489

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    FDR , not CVR. You are correct regarding CVR, it's usually ~30 min loop.
     
  10. Nov 5, 2016 #490

    StarJar

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    Yes, now which bay is it than contains ALL the things to do with communication and detection, but contains NOTHING to to do with flight systems, instrumentation, navigation, and control surface movement.
    I think it's like trying to find a part of your body that has veins, but no nerves. All that stuff is comingled like a rat's nest. I think this from working on avionics systems of general av. planes and some fighters. I don't think airliners could be much different.
     
  11. Oct 3, 2017 #491

    BJC

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  12. Jan 24, 2018 #492
  13. Jan 24, 2018 #493
  14. Jan 24, 2018 #494

    pictsidhe

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    a 5 1/4 would be a breeze for a government department and many museums. I recently came across a stack of 8" drives, remember those? I believe that flight recorders have been solid state for a while. Fire will kill those, but they are pretty tough otherwise. All the specs to read them in 100's of years time is out there on the web. You can bet it will be stored for when they are found, too. Stir in an EE and you have the data.
     

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