making gussets with a hole saw?

Discussion in 'Wood Construction' started by cdlwingnut, Mar 21, 2017.

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  1. Mar 21, 2017 #1

    cdlwingnut

    cdlwingnut

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    I see on a few places people have made rib gussets for minimax's and pietenpoles with a 2 inch hole saw?
    I am thinking of using this idea what are some thoughts on this?
     
  2. Mar 21, 2017 #2

    TFF

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    Looks cool. Might weigh a hair more where a triangle gusset would work.
     
  3. Mar 21, 2017 #3

    PTAirco

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    It's the way to go. You can churn them out. Have done it myself. If it weighs a hair more afterwards, just pluck out a hair from your head before take off.
     
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  4. Mar 21, 2017 #4

    BBerson

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    Is there a 1/4" pilot saw guide hole drilled in the center?
    Or careful slow start with pilot bit removed?
    Or, I guess a scrap 3/4" ply with 2" guide hole could start the saw.
     
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  5. Mar 21, 2017 #5

    pictsidhe

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    I've done various things with hole saws, no rib gussets yet. If you want to lose the central hole, hole saw through a piece of 3/4 ply, then clamp that down over your stock and use the holesaw without the pilot. A plywood guide will usually give a better result than a centre hole anyway, which can get a bit stressed in thin material and enlarge.
     
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  6. Mar 21, 2017 #6

    BBerson

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    If you put about 6 holes in the 3/4" ply, it would speed it up. (clamped to a table and using a slow hand drill motor)
     
  7. Mar 21, 2017 #7

    Hot Wings

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    Or if you have a drill press just clamp the gusset material to the table and use the pilot-less hole saw. I've also seen decent square and triangular ply gussets cut rapidly with a good quality paper cutter.
     
  8. Mar 21, 2017 #8

    Victor Bravo

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    If you are using wood ribs and wood gussets, then you can probably do it just as easily and quickly with a table saw and make polygons. If wasted material is an issue the polygons are far better. If you are using thin plywood, like 1/32", then you can use a paper cutter or tin snips to make the gussets very fast, and sand the edge smooth later. No matter how well you make the ribs, you will be "block sanding" the stack of ribs after they are done... so why add any more effort by worrying about beautifully cut individual gussets during assembly?

    If you have a CNC router or laser cutter available, then you can cut out a thousand small disks, glue the disks in place as gussets, and come back with a "trim router" after the glue is dry and get a perfect flush gusset. This can save many hours compared to cutting individual gussets.

    If you are trying to make an aesthetic work of aviation art and still save a bunch of time, then you can go back with a Dremel tool and a drum sander bit, and put in an antique style curved relief shape in the gusset between each rib stick.
     
  9. Mar 21, 2017 #9

    BBerson

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    My jump shear can cut 3/32" no problem because it guillotines in one stroke. Slight burr to sand off, if needed.
     
  10. Mar 21, 2017 #10

    Victor Bravo

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    Remember that all those millions and millions of die-cut Ringmaster and Flite Streak model airplane kits we all remember fondly had several 1/16 or 1/8 plywood die cut parts in them too. So BBerson's jump shear, or a razor press die, or my Wiss tin snips... is not nearly as much of a "woodworker's sin" as some people might think.

    For the hardcore purists, shearing does not lose any precious wood material to a saw kerf either.

    If you cut several one inch wide by 36 or 48 inch long strips of thin plywood on a jump shear, you could just use sharp Fiskars scissors or sharp tin snips to "custom" cut the angles for polygon gussets in seconds, and not "waste" the plywood material that would be lost by using disks.

    You would also save the four grams of extra weight per wing panel that the curved perimeter of the round disks would saddle you with :)
     
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  11. Mar 21, 2017 #11

    skeeter_ca

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    I cut 3" strips in 1/16th ply with my table saw, then used the included cheap sliding meter gauge set at 45 degrees. I eyeballed the cuts to each corner. Cut almost 1000 triangle gussets in about 15 minutes. After the rib is built i used my router with a flush laminate bit to shave off any gusset hanging outside the spruce sticks. Looks great!

    skeeter
     
  12. Mar 22, 2017 #12

    Kyle Boatright

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    I cut strips of 1/16" ply on the tablesaw for the gussets on my backburnered Hatz project. Then, I stacked and taped the same-sized stacks into bundles, and gang cut the gussets on my scroll saw.
     
  13. Mar 26, 2017 #13

    lake_harley

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    I used a slight variation on Victor Bravo's method, making the strips by scoring a couple times with a utility knife along a 4' straight-edge clamped at the proper width. I've done this with both 1.5MM and .08MM ply. The strips can be snapped off after a couple scoring passes, or with a bit of pressure just cut all the way through.

    To cut the individual gussets make a pattern from something like a cereal box and mark the gussets along the strip and cut them with a straight-cut tin snips. Easy peasy.

    I've done enough gussets for 3 sets of wing ribs this way....probably thousands of gussets.

    Lynn
     
  14. Mar 26, 2017 #14

    cluttonfred

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    Hmmm, would it work to take a short section of large-diameter steel tube and ground the perimeter to a sharp edge, then just cut the gussets like cookies by whacking with a mallet?
     
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  15. Mar 27, 2017 #15

    Victor Bravo

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    Yes, but from personal experience you are going to spend more time resharpening the edge of the tube than you think. If you are building an entire wing full of ribs you're probably talking about a couple of thousand or more gussets.

    A really neat thing would be to have it done with a big motorized hole punch
     
  16. Mar 28, 2017 #16

    TFF

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    Is no one using a paper cutter anymore?
     
  17. Mar 28, 2017 #17

    cdlwingnut

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    decided to go with the hole saw idea, this is how they came out and its pretty easy to get the angles and such right.
    20170324_143536_resized.jpg
     
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  18. Apr 5, 2017 #18

    skybound

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    I couldn't find one reasonable priced (or available to use) good enough to cut the wood. The one I bought was a piece of crap and couldn't cut anything thicker than 1 sheet of 20# paper. I ended up cutting my gussets with a veneer saw and tin snips. Not perfect, but clean enough to clean up the edges by hand. Took way longer, but not so bad in front of the TV with a beer.
     
  19. Apr 5, 2017 #19

    Hot Wings

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    They are kind of an 'old school' tool. At one time they were common items in most schools and offices, but not so much anymore. The good ones could handle .040" 2024 and .025" was so easy they were even found in some sheet metal shops. I haven't seen a 'good' one in quite a while....
     
  20. Apr 5, 2017 #20

    Pops

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    Like you, when I make plywood gussets I cut a strip of plywood with the 4' stomp shear, then cut to length with the homemade 12" shear that I make about 35 years ago. Both will cut plywood, aluminum and 4130 steel up to .040 . Just takes a few minutes to make all the gussets for all the ribs.
     

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