Making a TIO-XXX into an IO-XXX

Discussion in 'Firewall Forward / Props / Fuel system' started by pfarber, Oct 17, 2019.

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  1. Oct 17, 2019 #1

    pfarber

    pfarber

    pfarber

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    I see a lot of used TIO's in the 500+ ci range cheap.

    I guess no one wants these monsters, or maybe the turbo cost are more than the engine... I don't know.

    But looking at the core motor they don't seem to be much removed from the stock engine, save for the turbo routing.

    So my question is: How viable would it be to turn a TIO into an IO?

    Yeah, its heaver than a IO-360 but cheaper, and as long as it fit the airframe and W&B/control forces were sane it could get you into the air faster than saving for a 320/360

    Any thoughts??
     
  2. Oct 18, 2019 #2

    wsimpso1

    wsimpso1

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    The Lycoming IO360 is a four, use a longer crankshaft and two more of the same cylinders, and it is an IO540. Both get lower compression ratio pistons to become TIO engines. The induction and exhaust are different, but the pieces should be out there. Probably different calibration on fuel injection and ignition timing too.

    I suspect that the NA engine had an easier life than the turbo version, and that might account for the lower prices on them. Are used IO5xx cheaper than used IO3xx? That might be a lot more straightforward.
     
  3. Oct 18, 2019 #3

    plncraze

    plncraze

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    If you go this route check out the airboat guys for parts so you don't get stuck paying for yellow tag parts. Find the overhaul and parts books and get familiar with the table of limits and all the common parts for various engines.
     
  4. Oct 18, 2019 #4

    TFF

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    Depends on which engine. Mostly changing the fuel injection all the way to the injectors and the pumps to match. Lower compression would probably let you run auto fuel. Some may be really worn out. Some are odd specs. Something like a 541 for a Duke could eat you up if big parts are bad. Have to decide on the prop dilemma; pay for constant speed or have some fixed pitch with Lots of pitch to keep it from over speeding.

    As much as I am in favor of high time airplane engines on homebuilts, I got a buddy on another forum that bit into three bad engines for one airplane. The first probably would have been just fine had he busted it open the first sign of metal. He traded it off and got bigger messes. Make sure you can do some looking.
     
  5. Oct 26, 2019 #5

    PMD

    PMD

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    A good friend built one of his airplanes by buying a 337 with airframe problems, selling off one engine and using the other - literally for free. I have seen entire fleets of high time airframe big Lycs and Contis go for scrap. REALLY cheap source of engines.
     
  6. Oct 26, 2019 #6

    gtae07

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    I looked at that option a little while back; there were deals on certifed airplanes and homebuilts that even included avionics in some of them. Problem was (1) disposing of the unwanted airframe, (2) coming up with the storage space and transportation, (3) coming up with all the cash, and (4) some were airworthy airplanes, where it becomes hard not to say "why not just fly this?" except it wasn't what I really wanted.
     

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