Low Cost Fabric Covering

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

philr

New Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
1
The extra cost isn't going to be a deal breaker for those of us interested in part 103, but the weight increase could be. An ounce/yd is 15 pounds, just for the fabric on a part 103 120ft^2 wing.

Distressing news for sure!

Does Sig sell their 1.2 oz in bulk? If not where do they source theirs?
They sell it in Big sizes
  • SIG KOVERALL
SIG KOVERALL
SIG MANUFACTURING
SIGKV003
$21.58
Size
1 YARD PACKAGE [APPROXIMATELY 60" X 36"]2 YARD PACKAGE [APPROXIMATELY 60" X 72"]5 YARD PACKAGE [APPROXIMATELY 60" X 180"]SHORTS AND SECONDS-MINIMUM OF 2 YARDS WHITE
1 YARD PACKAGE [APPROXIMATELY 60" X 36"] 2 YARD PACKAGE [APPROXIMATELY 60" X 72"] 5 YARD PACKAGE [APPROXIMATELY 60" X 180"] SHORTS AND SECONDS-MINIMUM OF 2 YARDS WHITE
 

Ontarioflyer

Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2021
Messages
10
Yup, ordered another x3 five sq. yard bags yesterday, which should be enough to cover all required surfaces on my Lazair. I plan to start on the small tail pieces to get a feel for things, then move to the wings. Fabric cement from ACS on it's way also. I was able to get some test lab results (for piece of mind) from a testing lab, if anyone is interested. Can't beat the price and the material feels good. Lots of You-Tube, lots of reading, lots of learning. It's starting to get exciting!!!
 

Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
7,587
Location
Rocky Mountains
Thanks for the data!!
Combined PDF below and a copy=n=paste of what the FAA has to say about strength with bold added by me:

Fabric strength is a major factor in the airworthiness of
an aircraft. Fabric is considered to be airworthy until it
deteriorates to a breaking strength less than 70 percent of
the strength of the new fabric required for the aircraft. For
example, if an aircraft was certificated with Grade-A cotton
fabric that has a new breaking strength of 80 pounds, it
becomes unairworthy when the fabric strength falls to 56
pounds, which is 70 percent of 80 pounds. If polyester fabric,
which has a higher new breaking strength, is used to re-cover
this same aircraft, it would also need to exceed 56 pounds
breaking strength to remain airworthy.
In general, an aircraft is certified with a certain fabric based
on its wing loading and its never exceed speed (VNE). The
higher the wing loading and VNE, the stronger the fabric must
be. On aircraft with wing loading of 9 pounds per square foot
and over, or a VNE of 160 miles per hour (mph) or higher,
fabric equaling or exceeding the strength of Grade A cotton is
required. This means the new fabric breaking strength must be
at least 80 pounds and the minimum fabric breaking strength
at which the aircraft becomes unairworthy is 56 pounds.
On aircraft with wing loading of 9 pounds per square foot or
less, or a VNE of 160 mph or less, fabric equaling or exceeding
the strength of intermediate grade cotton is required. This
means the new fabric breaking strength must be at least 65
pounds and the minimum fabric breaking strength at which
the aircraft becomes unairworthy is 46 pounds.
Lighter weight fabric may be found to have been certified on
gliders or sailplanes and may be used on many uncertificated
aircraft or aircraft in the Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) category.
For aircraft with wing loading less than 8 pounds per square
foot or less, or VNE of 135 mph or less, the fabric is considered
unairworthy when the breaking strength has deteriorated to
below 35 pounds (new minimum strength of 50 pounds
).
Figure 3-10 summarizes these parameters.
 

Attachments

proppastie

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2012
Messages
4,971
Location
NJ
Lighter weight fabric may be found to have been certified on
gliders or sailplanes and may be used on many uncertificated
aircraft or aircraft in the Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) category.
For aircraft with wing loading less than 8 pounds per square
foot or less, or VNE of 135 mph or less
the fabric is considered
unairworthy when the breaking strength has deteriorated to
below 35 pounds (new minimum strength of 50 pounds
).
in other words the sig is not quite up to new minimum strength, but is over the 35 LB minimum for airworthy......Page 2 your testing data.


1612201448816.png
 

Doran Jaffas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2019
Messages
412
I'll take my "chances" with a mind blowing 40 mph in my Lazair (big wink).
I know the laser aircraft. Years ago we had one that our local airport that was covered with the clear mylar. it was really interesting watching him land with what appeared to be just a framework. Kind of a Wonder woman type airplane. that mylar or whatever it was always made me nervous because I knew all kind of traffically it could blow out any model airplane. Still the laser is a beautiful ultralight and I would love to have one if I could find a project. I've seen some converted to the single engine which I also thought made better sense. if anybody knows where one is available please contact me here. Thanks for that post and memories. By the way 40 miles an hour? Were you in a dive LOL.?
 

JohnB

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Aug 18, 2019
Messages
86
I also concur. The Legal Eagle is 4.5# psf wing loading and vne of abt 80 (uncomfortable at best, normally flown abt 60) so I'm gonna make up some 36" sq test panels and compare weights to 1.6 cloth just for giggles.
 

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,708
Location
Fresno, California
Since many companies are highly adverse to their products being used in man-carrying aircraft, I wonder if Sig would give you the name of the Mill that makes Coverall if you told them it was for a full sized aircraft? Perhaps the mill has other, stronger products available.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,397
Location
Memphis, TN
If it was the good old days when Glenn, Hazel, and Maxi hangared the Pitts and Clipped wing Cub in the warehouse, I’m sure they would have gotten a giggle you were covering a plane in it. Five to six years ago at the Oshkosh campground, I talked to someone who worked at Sig. Had a Mooney but had medical issues; before basic med. I think the company is too fragile if a run was made on their fabric now. They survive; but not much else is in the hobby except injected foam stuff. Traditional models are having a tough time. The mill might quit supplying them if a bunch of known airplanes are covered in their stuff. Lawyers/ Insurance are not going to allow them to sell it for ULs. Better to be stealth. Buy what you need and don’t answer questions other than you are buying a supply.
 

Mad MAC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
728
Location
Hamilton New Zealand
I find "its for ground support equipment" to be quite effective when dealing with commercial requests (never disclosing we test it on the ground then we fly it).
 
Top