looking for wood aircraft plans

Discussion in 'Wood Construction' started by jessfarms, Jan 28, 2010.

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  1. Aug 26, 2012 #61

    StarJar

    StarJar

    StarJar

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    If you want to grade d. Fir, your my kind of guy. If the grain is tight and straight it's strong...don't be scared by more timid souls who have never learned it or tried it.

    If you get a $100 table saw at Home Depot, Lowes, or whatever,,,it will do a good job, for your rib pieces and tail pieces. And later fuselage, and wing spars, etc.....Good luck..just start slow and careful, 'til you get the knack...
     
  2. Aug 26, 2012 #62

    Anymouse

    Anymouse

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    As far as getting the wood and what not, I suggest looking at the Mini-Max website again. They split their kits up into sub-kits that are more affordable. Getting the supplies from them doesn't seem to be much more expensive than if you ordered it yourself. The real plus is that you know you're getting the right stuff for your project.

    As far as the Part 103 stuff is concerned, if that's what you want then go for it. However, keep in mind that there is no FAA requirement for insurance on an EX-AB aircraft. Also, you may want to get a taildragger endorsement anyway. They handle differently on the ground. Should take more than a few hours (less than 5) and you can use that towards the requirements of your private pilot ticket.

    Good luck however you go.
     
  3. Aug 26, 2012 #63

    Kristoffon

    Kristoffon

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    I graded all my own wood. A whole morning well spent at the yard moving piles upon piles of lumber but I have got enought to build three planes for 1/10th the price I'd have paid for pre-graded.
     
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  4. Aug 26, 2012 #64

    Catocala

    Catocala

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    Hi!

    Just for the fun, have a look there:
    http://fms7259.e-monsite.com/
    (french guy building a wood and fabric three axis ultralight) very detailed website, english translation included.
    That plane is extremely simple and affordable. It flies with a very very small engine.
    Enjoy!

    Good flight for all.

    Bap
     
  5. Aug 27, 2012 #65

    PTAirco

    PTAirco

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    I did that once and had the help of a guy who really knew his wood; he could look at a pile of Douglas Fir 2x8s from 20 ft away and tell you exactly what you need, whether it was for ladders, pianos or violins or airplanes. I literally paid one tenth of what aircraft grade spruce cost and there wasn't a cubic inch of that stuff I couldn't use.
    So if you can find a wood guy to help you out, you're a long way ahead.

    Bear in mind that D.Fir is not a direct replacement for spruce - if you're building a Part 103 ultralight, it may end up too heavy.
     
  6. Aug 27, 2012 #66

    jessfarms

    jessfarms

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    thanks everyone I definitely want to give building the minimax a shot.
    I'm still unsure if I would ever be able to complete this project but I figure if I can't for some reason I could always sell the parts I make,but hopefully it never comes to that.
    I still have some questions though what would be the best source for sitka spruce? I've been looking for it at the lumber yards but all I can find is mixed lumber SPF.
    I really don't want to buy online because the price for graded wood + shipping really adds up.
    Also how difficult would it be for a first time builder to complete an airplane?
    I have an engine it's a kawasaki FE-290 10 hp, max rpm is 3600 rpm.
    now I know it calls for 25 hp but I was wondering if 10 horse would maybe get it off the ground and if not at least it would be something to taxi around and play with till I could get something bigger but anyways thanks for everyone's help.
     
  7. Aug 27, 2012 #67

    Anymouse

    Anymouse

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    I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that more than likely, everyone on this board that built an aircraft has probably been a first time builder. Despite that, they got it done. In other words, don't sweat it. There's a first time for everything. Thousands of other builders have been in the same spot you are in right now and got the job done. Just treat the project as a series of small tasks. Eventually, all those small tasks will come together to form an airplane. It can be done.
     
  8. Aug 27, 2012 #68

    litespeed

    litespeed

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    Hey Jess,

    The 10hp motor is not suitable- you will really need at least the 25hp specified.

    Yes 10hp would allow taxi training but you will need a prop for that and the flights anyway- might as well just get the right prop for the 25hp.

    You will be way underpowered for flight at 10hp and if you do get airborne, will not have enough for sustained flight or climb- this could be very dangerous.

    Taxi- yes

    Flight-No.

    Good luck on the build
     
  9. Aug 27, 2012 #69

    jessfarms

    jessfarms

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    I have one more question
    all the lumber yards Ive been to sell SPF so is there a way to pick out the spruce from the mixed lumber?
    or is it okay to use SPF if the grain is tight and straight with no knots? I would only use the highest grade and it would only be used in the fuselage, I wouldn't use it to make ribs or spars or anything I would buy that from aircraft spruce.
     
  10. Aug 27, 2012 #70

    StarJar

    StarJar

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    OK here's the thing. The lumber yard must have a section with CLEAR lumber. If not you need to find one that does.

    'Clear' lumber is premium planks without knots. OK....BUT 'clear' is still not good enough for aircraft. HOWEVER..among those 'clear' peices you may find some planks that have the proper grain, that meet the specifications for aircraft.

    What 'clear' (no knots) lumber is good enough for aircraft? There should be at least 6 grain lines per inch........and the grain cannot be crooked more that 1" for every 15 inches of length. Pretty much, that simple...so you should memorize that part...it can save you alot of money.

    Sometimes to find a stack of clear lumber, you need to find a smaller store, that specializes in selling wood to CABINET MAKERS. You will find better wood there...
     

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