Lifting body + prone position ?

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Retroflyer_S, Sep 27, 2015.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Sep 11, 2019 #141

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2014
    Messages:
    2,321
    Likes Received:
    935
    Location:
    Rochester, NY, USA
    I sleep on my stomach. :)

    but most of my flying is seated to supine.

    I'm going to take a WAG that human G tolerance is better standing, than inverted. I'm talking momentary loads like in a crash with sudden deceleration. The internal organ attachment "cables" are exercised most often, upright,in daily walking about. The opposite constraint structure is not.

    but that's hypocritical, ;) The question not asked here is neck strain/fatigue. Most seated positions allow normal neck position with head upright. As the seat back angle increases it's more work to keep the head upright to view forward & instruments. By the time you are at sailplane recline postions, a head rest is needed. My supine harness has an adjustable head rest. I've napped in it, hung under a tree while waiting for weather.

    Prone positions strain the neck too. But worse, since even spine straight look straight down positions require you to hold your head up. ( and if you got prone, you'd better have a window under your head, or why bother? ) Looking forward is more strain. Hang glider pilots build those muscles over time, but even so, after hours of flight it's the neck, not the arms, that aches most. Good hang gliding helmets are cut high in back compared to motorcycle helmets to allow better forward & some upward vision.

    The design of a head restraint system is more difficult, prone. Since the head restraint must be tied into the harness, not structure. It's the shoulder/neck/head relationship you need to preserve, and without a seat back to index a head restraint, it must be part of the harness.

    And if you want to crawl into position and not need others to strap you in, you need a harness you wear, ( like a basic training hang glider prone harness ) that you then clip in to your couch? at hips and chest.

    It may be easier to skip any kind of surface to lie on, and just suspend a full coverage harness from the structure in 3 dimensions. ( the Nausicca replica used this method )

    Prone isn't impossible, it just takes at least as much consideration and work as seated. The question is, are the compromises worth the gains?
     
  2. Sep 11, 2019 #142

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2014
    Messages:
    2,321
    Likes Received:
    935
    Location:
    Rochester, NY, USA
    I will point out the Horton H.IV uses a kneeling/prone position that eases, but not eliminates the concerns.
     
  3. Sep 11, 2019 #143

    Aerowerx

    Aerowerx

    Aerowerx

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2011
    Messages:
    4,991
    Likes Received:
    1,357
    Location:
    Marion, Ohio
    A question for you. In case of a hard landing, what part of your anatomy would you prefer to go through the nose of the plane? Your head or your legs?

    A broken leg, even both of them at the same time, is a lot easier to get fixed than a broken neck or crushed skull!
     
    Charles_says and bmcj like this.
  4. Sep 11, 2019 #144

    DangerZone

    DangerZone

    DangerZone

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Messages:
    2,107
    Likes Received:
    370
    Location:
    Zagreb HR
    Are you asking about the decalage angle or the canard angle of incidence?

    On topic (lifting body + prone position); check the following video.


    How much time do you guys think people need to invert the microjet engines and put them on the pilot-skydiver forearms in a pulling position so he could use hands to supermaneouver or navigate?

    This video shows the idea of humans flying is feasible. Pushing into ring dips is very hard, everyone famialir with gymnastics is aware of that. Pulling is easier, and self balancing. Installing jet engines on hands in a pulling configuration rather than a pushing position would certainly help.

    Pushing some ring dips
    [​IMG]

    Position ready for pulling in a pullup
    [​IMG]

    Anyway, it would be easy to transition from a pullup position to a prone position with jet engines installed on forearms. Ina pushing configuration, it would be completely counterintuitive.
     
  5. Sep 11, 2019 #145

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,918
    Likes Received:
    4,867
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    The developer did say that his configuration was based on the high strength gymnastic skills that he had developed.

    By the way, it’s not obvious, but he has an engine on his back that helps lift him and balances out the four engines on his arms. The back engine is about twice the thrust as a single arm engine, so that is like three equal strength legs of a tripod.

     
    DangerZone likes this.

Share This Page

arrow_white