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Pops

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Jan 1, 2013
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10,682
Location
USA.
We have a 3150 grass runway. About 15 years ago we bought a gov auction reel mower that is 16' wide when all the mowers lowered down. Ford 6 cylinder engine. Summer time we mow 2 times a week. That's just about an hour to mow it all. Now its getting time to replace it. Like to find another of $2400. Before that time, we used my MF Tractor with a 6' finish mower and another Ford tractor with a 6' finish mower. Took about 1 and 45 minutes with both tractors.
 

Mark Z

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Joined
Aug 29, 2012
Messages
920
Location
Granbury, Texas USA 0TX0
Our runway gets mowed in sections. We’re 2800’ x 200’; the neighbor on the north end mows the first 300’ to shame me. I then mow the next 700’ to shame those further south. We have a typical southerly flow so I figure I can easily get off in the first third and if the turf is higher beyond that it just aids to slow me down on landing. We all do our share to keep a great looking turf.
 

davidb

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Jun 3, 2008
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Location
Vacaville, CA
For the folks here that have a Higher Power door, what was the total cost for the door? I’ll give them a call next week but just curious in the meantime. I have a quote on a FoldTite at $6000.
 

Rhino

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Apr 8, 2004
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1,978
Location
KTHA
My 40x12 HP door was just under $12,000 in 2020. Shipping was around $900. That price doesn't include any exterior sheathing. They assume you'll use whatever's being used on the hangar itself. Battery backup was priced at $425, but I have a generator so I didn't need it. You can use that with a small solar panel to power the door in a hangar with no electricity. I did spring $620 for the key fob remote controls and phone app. The app still doesn't work, but the key fobs work from far away even without adding an external antenna, so I'm pleased.
 

davidb

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Jun 3, 2008
Messages
1,790
Location
Vacaville, CA
I have a quote request to Well Bilt for their new HydraTilt door which seems like it is very similar to the Higher Power design. Their facility is located very close to my build site.
 

PTAirco

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Joined
Sep 20, 2003
Messages
3,686
Location
Corona CA
I just bought a lot a nice desert airport in Nevada, quite cheaply, and was all set build a hangar when the cost of steel buildings pretty much doubled in the last year. The buildings apparently all got Covid or something and had be treated in hospital and that doubled the cost. Or something. I don't really get it and "supply issues" etc. doesn't explain it. Greed and jumping on the Covid-bandwagon does. Call me naïve.

So no hangar for at least a year for me. Lumber prices have dropped in the area from five times the usual to only twice as much. I guess trees got Covid too.
I always like ferro-cement structures, but the local building department would have a fit and just say no, since if it isn't 2x4s, they don't understand it. Too old to fight that nonsense. Besides, cement also got Covid and had to be doubled in cost. <Sigh>
 

Bigshu

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Jun 7, 2020
Messages
1,089
I just bought a lot a nice desert airport in Nevada, quite cheaply, and was all set build a hangar when the cost of steel buildings pretty much doubled in the last year. The buildings apparently all got Covid or something and had be treated in hospital and that doubled the cost. Or something. I don't really get it and "supply issues" etc. doesn't explain it. Greed and jumping on the Covid-bandwagon does. Call me naïve.

So no hangar for at least a year for me. Lumber prices have dropped in the area from five times the usual to only twice as much. I guess trees got Covid too.
I always like ferro-cement structures, but the local building department would have a fit and just say no, since if it isn't 2x4s, they don't understand it. Too old to fight that nonsense. Besides, cement also got Covid and had to be doubled in cost. <Sigh>
Well, if you have the stomach to fight the local building department, you might try rammed earth or cob or adobe. Much more environmentally friendly, better thermal mass (save to heat or cool the place), last forever, and last I checked, dirt still costs the same as it did in 2019. If you don't like that much labor intensiveness, you could try earth bags, which get covered with a coat of clay/lime plaster to finish, or even straw bales, which are showing up in a lot of barndominiums these days. Lots of different techniques can get a low cost building done, and the best part is, no supply chain delays, because the dirt is right there on property ( you do need a little bit of Portland cement as a binder, but it's a really low %).
 

rv7charlie

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Nov 17, 2014
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2,846
Location
Pocahontas MS
Call me naïve.
Well, ok....
;-)
Seriously, while there certainly has been profiteering going on in some sectors (timber is a prime example, with lumber producers never paying any more to the timber cutters, but tripling their prices to the distributors/retailers), consider what it would take to support the position that it's *all a conspiracy*. If it is, it's the most widespread (literally every developed nation in the world) incorporating virtually every production path, in perfect lockstep. If this is happening, then World Peace (or maybe whirled peas) is going to break out shortly after midnight tonight.

Higher prices when demand exceeds supply is 'baked into the cake'; welcome to capitalism. (Spoken by someone who didn't stay in a Holiday Inn last night, but did earn an Economics Degree.) Most businesses operate in as capitalistic a fashion as they can achieve, meaning that there's basically zero excess labor available to produce their products. It takes very little disruption to have serious effects to their production. If production is disrupted just a little bit all along the supply chain, it causes major issues with supply. When labor outages are happening all over the developed world due to such a widespread disease, it's inevitable that supplies will be limited. We didn't see the effects early, because no one could actually get out & buy anything beyond necessities. But now that we're consuming again, demand is far outstripping supply. We've lost almost a million people in just the USA beyond the normal death rate; many of them from the work force. Add to that all the experienced workers (likely in the millions here in the USA) who were near the end of their careers, and decided that the Covid Break was a perfect time to pull the trigger on retirement. Add to all that the steady stream of ICU residents....See where this is going?
 
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Vigilant1

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Jan 24, 2011
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7,665
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US
Seriously, while there certainly has been profiteering going on in some sectors (timber is a prime example, with lumber producers never paying any more to the timber cutters, but tripling their prices to the distributors/retailers),
The supply constraint that caused the jump in lumber prices was at the sawmills (and they were making all they could). There were plenty of trees (in fact, there's a glut thanks to government policies that encouraged a lot of planting). The mill operator was supposed to pay more for the trees when they were already in huge surplus? Why?
 
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davidb

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Jun 3, 2008
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Vacaville, CA
Near as I can tell, last summer was the peak of building cost volatility. Things seem to have stabilized at 30% higher than pre-Covid with the expected inflation of 6-10% increases per year moving forward.
 

reo12

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Jan 15, 2021
Messages
91
A large percentage of lumber products are normally imported from Canada. Covid shut the border. Lumber was not allowed to be imported. The demand for domestic product drove prices up. People held off doing non-essential building. Border opened. Supply improved - but pent up demand is keeping prices elevated.
Prices are going to be mucked up for a while.
 

Bill-Higdon

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Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
2,072
Location
Salem, Oregon, USA
A large percentage of lumber products are normally imported from Canada. Covid shut the border. Lumber was not allowed to be imported. The demand for domestic product drove prices up. People held off doing non-essential building. Border opened. Supply improved - but pent up demand is keeping prices elevated.
Prices are going to be mucked up for a while.
Until the real estate market crashes again.
 
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