Late to the Dream

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Jim D, Feb 14, 2019.

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  1. Feb 14, 2019 #1

    Jim D

    Jim D

    Jim D

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    Hey guys (and gals?).

    At one time, many years ago, I had started a bucket list. It seemed like the thing to do. After a couple years, I realized that it had actually turned into a Closet of Regrets. I found that I had allowed the clutter of life, and that beast called "practicality", to derail some of the goals and dreams I had set forth. It was a pretty depressing point, and it weighed me down with discouragement.

    However, I recently had a bounce-back, deciding that if I'm going to accomplish anything, it won't happen while moping over the wasted years behind me. I have to do <em>something</em>.

    You may have gotten the impression that I'm an older guy. Yep, getting older, but with enough denial left in me to have some fun. Riding my motorcycle helps keep me young(ish), as well as keeping up on motor skills, situational awareness, and decision making while in motion.

    I want to get into flying in the Light Sport category. First, because in acquiring a new skill set at my age I don't need something that goes warp 6, second, because I'm not particularly in a hurry, and third, at my age I'm inclined toward a Sport Pilot license; it would be heartbreaking to put the time, money, and effort into a PPL then have a medical disqualification.

    I've been starting to look at some plan-built models. That's appeals to my limited budget, but 4-5 years of building would cut into what I have left on the clock. I'm also looking at a CH-701. The 750 would be my first choice, but there's that budget thing. At this moment it appears a 701 would be the shortest route to the goal of getting in the air. Considering the cabin size, I would like an opportunity to sit in one before pulling the trigger. I'll have to try and find out if there is one within reasonable distance of me.

    Until a final decision is made, I'm keeping my options open. Anyway, I'm here for an education, and also to enjoy the discussion of things aviation.

    See you around the site.
     
  2. Feb 14, 2019 #2

    Toobuilder

    Toobuilder

    Toobuilder

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    Welcome.

    sounds like "flying" is the primary goal vs. a "workshop/time killer". If so, BUY a finished airplane ASAP. Obviously less time to get in the air but it will be cheaper too. A win/win.
     
    wsimpso1, rv6ejguy, BJC and 1 other person like this.
  3. Feb 14, 2019 #3
  4. Feb 14, 2019 #4

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    Toolbuilder is correct in saying buy a plane that you can fly now, but only after you know what type of flying you want to do. Many low cost airplanes in the 15K to 25K range that will work for sport pilot. If your open to single seat than you can find something in the 10K range. Dont be tempted by what seems like an easy project unless your goal is to learn some skills and build while taking your lessons and such. The CH701 if I am not mistaken is not match drilled holes unless they updated it. The CH750 builds faster and will fit 2 normal sized human. I am 6'4" and had the same worry until I found one locally and got a ride. No problem for tall people. Not much left over for weight though if both are heavy and full tanks.

    If I were you try and decide what your flying goals are and pick a plane in your budget that will do that. If flyin camping in the back country is your thing look for a STOL airplane. If you and the wife or kid want to go somewhere and can fit in a Sonex that is an option as well. You might do a search for your local EAA chapter and introduce yourself. Likely members have many aircraft you can go for a ride in that fit different roles and really find out more of the type of flying you may want to do bye experiencing it with other EAA members. If your not near any large international airports or populated areas you could even spend 5K and buy an ultralight. Or build one, I have ultralight plans I sell below in my signature and its about 1.5 year commitment so less than a CH750, but far less practical and fits a different role. RANS make a few really good 2 seat sport planes that look liek ultralights but fly like real airpalnes. Many can be found used under 10K and you can still take a passenger.

    Lots of choices and money is much less of an issue. I find getting the significant other a harder hurdle...

    Marc
     
  5. Feb 14, 2019 #5

    blane.c

    blane.c

    blane.c

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

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    Do not get a flight medical from an flight physician just get a regular physical from one, afterwards ask them if there is any reason you would fail a 3rd class medical. If there is no reason you would fail one go ahead and get one "once" and then just get the online and regular doctor 3rd class version after that, it will open up the class of aircraft you can fly and the license's you can hold.

    Take some flight lessons. Study for the written (https://www.asa2fly.com/Test-Prep-C3.aspx). I got my first few written tests done with the KING tapes many other people have too.

    Try some glider lessons too.
     
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  6. Feb 14, 2019 #6

    radfordc

    radfordc

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    You can always buy a used plane cheaper than you can build one from a kit. You can take a second spare time job and have the money to pay for the used plane much quicker than building one.
     
  7. Feb 14, 2019 #7

    blane.c

    blane.c

    blane.c

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    Its never the purchase cost either it is the maintenance. Its also the housing. Paying "your" mechanic to do a pre-purchase inspection is one of the least expensive things you'll ever do as an aircraft owner.
     
  8. Feb 14, 2019 #8

    pwood66889

    pwood66889

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    Yet Another Welcome (YAW), Mr. D. Please consider at length buying and flying as opposed to building. Unless the Building is the mission, and Flying is the side-arm operation, you're better off. I'm working my way (too slowely) through that now.
    Oh, and consider a flying club. If you can't find one, check with your local EAA (eaa.org > Chapters > Find a chapterl; search by state = South Carolina). My EAA chapter is working up to one now.
     
  9. Feb 14, 2019 #9

    lr27

    lr27

    lr27

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    Welcome.

    Seems like if you just want to fly, ultralights are the cheapest way in. I live 1/2 hour from a major city, but there's a place to fly ultralights only 1/2 hour away in the other direction. I'll admit I don't fly full scale aircraft myself, but I've been interested for a long time. I suspect if you know someone who's knowledgeable about ultralights, and can inspect one with great care, a used ultralight could be a good deal. The last time I was at the local field, someone was selling a Mini Max for $4,000.

    The really cheapest way in must be a paraglider, but I don't know enough about them to evaluate the risk. I've seen people show up at a sand dune facing the wind with a backpack full of fabric and string, open it up, and start flying. Almost as easily with a paramotor. Probably need strong legs, ankles, and knees, though, unless you go with a trike.

    You might check out Mike Sandlin's designs. On the minimalist side. Several gliders and one powered ultralight, as I recall. Keep in mind that gliders you can't carry on your back may present logistical problems.
     
  10. Feb 14, 2019 #10

    Toobuilder

    Toobuilder

    Toobuilder

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    Getting the PPL first (and basic med after) is a fine way to go.

    As for figuring out what kind of airplane you want first - I'd say do some rough research, but trust me, your mission is likely to change significantly after you gain some experience. Buy something cool, then buy something else when you out grow it.
     

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