Large Guy Vs. Light Plane...

Discussion in 'The light stuff area' started by Standin, Aug 29, 2019.

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  1. Aug 29, 2019 #1

    Standin

    Standin

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    My first real post.

    Problem: I'm 6'1" and 300 lbs and have heart disease. So, its light Sport or part 103. Are there any plans that part 103 and light enough, yet, strong enough for me to fly.

    Thanks for the help and information!
     
  2. Aug 29, 2019 #2

    narfi

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    There are certified options, so I am sure you can make something to your size and liking....

    Example,
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piper_J-3_Cub

    Taking a passenger will be more difficult, but you should be able to find more than a couple options that give you 4-500lbs useful which is enough for you and fuel, or you and child for a short flight.
     
  3. Aug 29, 2019 #3

    narfi

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    Here you go,

    http://www.zenithair.net/specs-750stol/

    If built for LSA gives you 545 useful, call it 500 if you are a little heavy building it.

    that gives you enough for you, a 120lb passenger, and 13 gal of fuel.
     
  4. Aug 29, 2019 #4

    cdlwingnut

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    ok hate to burst your bubble but if you have a condition that you know would keep you from getting a medical then 103 is your only option and even that is iffy since you are supposed to be able to self certify that you don't have any of these conditions. If anything i wouldn't be advertising that you know you have heart conditions
     
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  5. Aug 29, 2019 #5

    galapoola

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    If you can get to 275 then the Legal Eagle XL is a viable 103 design.
    The Rans S-21 Outbound can be registerd LSA or an experimental amateur built.
    Either way it's the same plane (I asked the folks at Rans).
    That means it can fly safely at 1800 lbs with a Titan 340 or 1600 lbs with a Rotax 912ULS.
    I'm not saying you can heft two guys your weight with a full load of fuel and make the 1320 lbs LSA max legally, but the plane sure can if you know what I mean.
    So legally you can't do certain things and I advise you shouldn't.
    As far as safely operating a design within the max weight, there are options.
    BTW, I'm a bit taller a few pounds lighter.
    I set a goal to loose 50 lbs in a year.
    With 9 months to go I'm half way there.
    That said, probably anyone can do it, I'm just eating less and started walking more every day.
     
  6. Aug 29, 2019 #6

    narfi

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    I don't want to be a downer, but make sure you have realistic expectations..... 25/50 is more realistically 1/5th of the way there :/
     
  7. Aug 29, 2019 #7

    bmcj

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    The Quicksilver MX-2 has the capacity, but it is not technically Part 103 due to weight and seat count. However, change the dual seats out for a wider single seat (maybe even a bench seat) and it would probably pass visually as an ultralight. You might even be able to shave some weight with the seat change and maybe even an engine change, but many people are saying that the Feds appear to be more concerned about the appearance more that being a few pounds over.

    Don’t take this as a tacit approval though... under the rule of law, it would still not ‘legally’ qualify as a Part 103 ultralight.
     
  8. Aug 29, 2019 #8

    plncraze

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    Also figure out where you will base your plane. If you are just flying out of a field in the middle of nowhere just make sure it looks "right" like bmcj said.
     
  9. Aug 29, 2019 #9

    Dennis DeFrange

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    Hey standin , I can relate to your situation . There are some airplane designs that will fit what you are reaching out for . I'v found that those that do not face this situation really do not offer good and sound advice . You are in no way grounded unless you have applied for a medical and been been rejected . If you do that and do get rejected , you cannot even fly an ultralite . Game over other than Out Law . Go to the EAA website and search Light Sport Aircraft . Unbelievable , the list of planes that qualify , homebuilt and certified . Your size will be the limiting factor but the one for you is out there . Any direction that you choose , My personal advice to you is don't hesitate to discuss your intentions with your family Doctor and take heed to his/her advise . Your family Dr. is probably in no way connected with the FAA and what you discuss should be kept confidential . Heart conditions are attention drawing when and can be addressed with a Special Issuance but that is costly and most likely will have to be addressed yearly . If you get through the first one , all seems fine until a year later . KaaBoom . there go's everything invested . I discussed this same issue with a DME and he characterized it in this way , You could be rejected due to a minute Coronary condition and have a brother with Epilepsy that can fly when he wants . Doesn't give me that warm and fuzzy feeling . Whatever you choose , do it with your safety , as well as the safety of others a priority .
     
  10. Aug 29, 2019 #10

    cdlwingnut

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  11. Aug 29, 2019 #11

    cdlwingnut

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    The odds of getting caught if you violate the FARs specially when dealing with 103 or light sport by fudging the numbers or keeping quiet about a medical issue are slim, BUT, when that engine gets quiet and you take out some farmers beans, or a tire blows on takeoff and you hit that airport fence and the you catch the attention of the feds then look out. also if you do carry insurance it will probably be worthless if you are violating an FAR so watch that too.
     
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  12. Aug 30, 2019 #12

    Dana

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    Not quite true. If you have a failed medical, you can't fly Sport Pilot, but ultralights and gliders (including motorgliders) are still an option.

    To the OP, I know a guy who must weigh at least 300 who flies an Avid. Mostly solo, but he's taken his [presumably small, I never met her] wife on cross countries in the plane.
     
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  13. Aug 30, 2019 #13

    MadProfessor8138

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    The only aircraft that I would even possibly consider attempting to slip past Big Brother is a Quicksilver design.
    They tend to look the other way if it looks like a duck and acts like a duck.
    But even with pulling the 2nd seat out of a double and making it a single seater....it is still " WAY " over weight by around 240 lbs....give or take.
    Mind your P's & Q's and dont draw attention to yourself and they should never have a reason to pull out the scales and get a running start before they break it off in you.

    Kevin
     
  14. Aug 30, 2019 #14

    BBerson

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    A pilot of a motorglider doesn't need any FAA Medical, but FAR 61.53 (b) precludes flight with a known unsafe medical condition. FAR 103.9 addresses hazards to others.
     
  15. Aug 30, 2019 #15

    rdj

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    Standin, can you define your "mission" better? LSA and Ultralight (since the demise of the fat ones) really describe two different flying profiles now (two-seat with range versus single-seat, mostly local). Big airport or local field? Hanger or tie-down? (Florida can get very windy, eg, this weekend.) Passenger or single-seat? More details would help focus the search.

    As for the medical condition, keep in mind that the Feds don't care about you. They care about those around you and any associated bad press, so keep that in mind during the process. You can fly an ultralight on a dry lake bed all day long and the Feds wouldn't care what condition you had, provided you don't take out an endangered tortoise or something if you auger in.
     
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  16. Aug 30, 2019 #16

    Dennis DeFrange

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    As I stated earlier , discuss this intention with your family Dr. From all that I can find anywhere , you cannot hide or be untruthful about your condition but if your personal physician see's that you are safe to fly an airplane , that's as far as it needs to go . There is a huge difference between Sport Pilot and Light Sport Pilot . Sport pilot is where the EAA and AOPA just broke it off in our rump . They worked very hard to get the Sport Pilot privileges for folks that had no issues other than not wanting to go through the process of getting a flight physical or not wanting to pay for it . Didn't do a dam thing for those of us that might have a condition that would put us at the mercy of their decision . Again , find yourself with a condition that put's you in our shoes and you will probably come up with totally different view . You do not have to self certify to fly Light Sport like you do to fly as a Sport Pilot . Sport Pilot privileges open up a whole new ball game . Light Sport doe's not , you're still bound by 1320 weight limit as well as speed and stall limitations . If ya got something that is rock solid and understandable to read , I am open to looking at it . I always stand to be corrected . Thanx for all input .
     
  17. Aug 30, 2019 #17

    Charles_says

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    Sorry that is not what the FARs read, to wit:

    (c) Operations requiring either a medical certificate or U.S. driver's license. (1) A person must hold and possess either a medical certificate issued under part 67 of this chapter or a U.S. driver's license when—

    (i) Exercising the privileges of a student pilot certificate while seeking sport pilot privileges in a light-sport aircraft other than a glider or balloon;

    (ii) Exercising the privileges of a sport pilot certificate in a light-sport aircraft other than a glider or balloon;

    (iii) Exercising the privileges of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating while acting as pilot in command or serving as a required flight crewmember of a light-sport aircraft other than a glider or balloon;
    ______________________________________________


    (E) If the individual has been diagnosed with any medical condition that may impact the ability of the individual to fly, be under the care and treatment of a State-licensed physician when acting as pilot in command of an operation conducted under §61.113(i).

    (§61.113(i) refers to Private pilot privileges)
    ______________________________________
    NOTE Having Heart disease is not an immediate disqualification from flight.

    One can still fly as a private pilot, with a Special Issuance certificate, with a yearly "checkup".
    Charles _says.
    ______________________________________

    (iii) Not have had his or her most recently issued medical certificate (if the person has held a medical certificate) suspended or revoked or most recent Authorization for a Special Issuance of a Medical Certificate withdrawn; and


    (iv) Not know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make that person unable to operate a light-sport aircraft in a safe manner.

    (ii) The most recently issued medical certificate—

    (A) May include an authorization for special issuance;

    (B) May be expired; and

    (C) Cannot have been suspended or revoked.



    (iii) The most recently issued Authorization for a Special Issuance of a Medical Certificate cannot have been withdrawn; and


    (iv) The most recent application for an airman medical certificate submitted to the FAA cannot have been completed and denied.

    There is no regulation for a medical certificate, in Part 103. The FAA does not consider
    an ultralight vehicle an aircraft. Therefore will not issue an airworthiness certificate either.
    Charles_says


    Sec. 103.7 Certification and registration.

    (a) Notwithstanding any other section pertaining to certification of
    aircraft or their parts or equipment,
    ultralight vehicles and their component parts and equipment are not required to meet the airworthiness
    certification
    standards specified for aircraft or to have certificates of airworthiness.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other section pertaining to airman certification,
    operators of ultralight vehicles are not required to meet any aeronautical knowledge, age, or experience requirements to operate those vehicles or to have airman or medical certificates.

    But there are some limitations.....
    you cannot fly for compensation, or carry any passengers
    airspace regs, distances from clouds etc...
    Which are beyond the scope of this medically related message.
    Charles_says.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019
  18. Aug 30, 2019 #18

    Charles_says

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    Dennis, you are confusing terms.
    Sport pilot refers to the airman.
    Light sport refers to the aircraft.

    So a Light sport pilot, is a Sport pilot.
    It isn't another classification.
     
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  19. Aug 30, 2019 #19

    Dennis DeFrange

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    The DME that explained this to me is one of the most well known DME's in the field . In fact he was one of the two DME's that worked directly with the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) You do not operate under a Light Sport classification , you simply declare that you are operating an aircraft under Light Sport requirements . The aircraft has to be Light Sport compliant . Pretty simple . I'm not confusing anything . There is a difference in requirements for either . For instance up to 1320 lbs ( Piper Cubs Champs ) etc. and then up to 6000 lbs and 4 passengers , daylight or dark , or whatever that is . I personally have no interest in Sport Pilot privileges so I cannot comment there . What I'm stating is , if standin ( the originator of this thread chooses to fly a Piper Cub and his Dr . cannot declare physical conditions that that would deem him incapable of operating a Piper Cub safely , then he should be able to fly a Piper Cub . I don't care about someone dragging up a FAR and translating it however they think it should read . Again , I stand to be corrected but ya gotta show me something better than what was posted above .
     
  20. Aug 30, 2019 #20

    TFF

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    Light sport/ sport pilot is not basic medical. Sport pilot privileges for a PPL is different than getting just a sport pilot license. Basic medical privileges are still different. There is some crossover in aircraft uses, but they are all separate things. .
     

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