Landing a no-engine Airbus 320

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RacerCFIIDave

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Not if the programmer didn't want you to. Airbus' system sounds pretty robust but only they know if the control laws would allow a slip in under any circumstances.

On the subject of landing jets in tight spaces under extreme duress. Back in the 40s the runway at Winslow AZ was a few feet longer than the B-49's minimum stopping distance and a few feet wider that the main gear yet Cardenas managed to land there with half of his engines out.
Yeah...but he's probably the best BIG airplane pilot that ever walked...something about all that time at Edwards...:)

Dave
 

Topaz

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Can't argue with that.:beer: However spot landings are what glider guiders do, wasn't that Topaz's original point.
My point was that everyone should be able to do them - and with the engine off, too. ;)

If I can do it, it's certainly not magic. :gig:
 

Dana

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Grayout, my objection to "miracle" is that this event, regardless of how unlikely, can be described without straining the known laws of science or probability. Even the million in one chance happens, one in a million times. That's not to say that the pilot didn't have some help from above to steady his hand, call that "miraculous" if you want, but it's not required to describe what happened.

As for the traffic on the river, I've flown the VFR corridor over it many times at 1000', including the emergency landing on the pier I mentioned earlier, and I've never seen it congested enough to prevent a successful ditching.

On another note, I was pleased to see an internal memo where I work, noting the successful deployment of the ram air turbine, and the fact that the RAT includes hydraulic components manufactured by our company (nothing I was involved with, though).

-Dana

A pilot is a confused soul who talks about women when he's flying, and about flying when he's with a woman.
 

davidb

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The computers on the A320 don't prohibit slipping--it's required for crosswind landings. Also, under "normal law" the computer automatically puts in aileron to maintain track if you feed in rudder.

My comment about not being certified for forward slips was meant to suggest why formal airline pilot training doesn't include forward slip practice into the sylabus. But all airline pilots were once private pilots who practiced forward slips during training. So it's in their "bag of tricks" if they really need it. Aren't slips part of basic pilot training and not exclusive to glider training?

BTW, extremely aggresive slipping could sling the engines off the wing of a typical airliner as well as overstressing the rudder.
 

Gray Out

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Hello,

Grayout, my objection to "miracle"...

...I've flown the VFR corridor over it many times at 1000', ...
-Dana

A pilot is a confused soul who talks about women when he's flying, and about flying when he's with a woman.

Your point is taken sir.

VFR does not allow night flight when they are all tucked away for the night waiting...but again...I think we both agree to be grateful it happened during the day and not at night or during a special event and that everyone survived regardless of how it is explained by anyone.

Thanks
 

Topaz

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...Aren't slips part of basic pilot training and not exclusive to glider training?
They were in my power-pilot training, although with not as much emphasis as I got with gliders. That may simply have been differences between individual instructors, however.
 

radfordc

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Yep. I have to wonder how many full-scale power pilots actually practice deadstick landings after they get their cert - and how often.

Anyone? When was the last time you practiced this? And I mean all the way to the ground, not "turn the power back on at 500'AGL"? That gets you points for nuthin'. ;)
As an ultralight pilot I routinely shut down my engine and land. Flying two stroke engines requires that you fly with the mindset that it's not IF, but WHEN will the engine quit. I've made over a 100 no power landings. I've also had about nine "real" engine failures and so far haven't even scratched the paint.

Having said that, I still haven't shut down the engine on my Sonex and landed. Just not enough margin for error on my short, narrow grass strip. I do pull power to idle and fly the approach all the way to the runway. If I have to add power I call it a "crash".

Charlie
 

jack.39

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Mohave County, AZ USA
Sorry, just joined, a little late! The RAT blade diameter on Airbus A-380 is 1.6m in diameter, largest in the world! Just thought I'd say. Thanks for looking. jack
 
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