Land ownership ?

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Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
The old saying that "good neighbors are hard to find" couldn't be more true. I now live in a subdivision. I have been quite fortunate to have excellent neighbors over the years. Two of my neighbors who were older widowed lady's whom adopted me as a second grandson so to speak, passed away sadly. The neighbors on my port side is solid gold and love them like family.

When the other neighbors passed, their homes were sold by their children and two became rental home's after they were purchased by the current landlords.. I would like to tell you that they were careful in whom the sold and rented to but that's just not the case. My block went from peaceful and easy going to all sorts of antics that I am certain you can imagine.

I have gotten to the point where I just keep to myself and when a new set of neighbors moves in my family and I gather by the window and ask ourselves who long they will last. Normally we would go over and introduce ourselves and take along some May-haw Jelly my wife makes as a house warming gift.

Not anymore. I have found that some people are just not worth getting to know. Being a country boy, I am used to my "neighbors" being my family members and our homes are situated a country mile apart. I sure miss living in the sticks. Always something to do. Here on my 1.5 acres of land I just do yard work which I enjoy immensely. It is my therapy after a day of teaching knuckle heads.

Maybe one day a fellow aviator will move next door but I doubt it. Passers by stop often to inquire on what type of "boat" I am building. I have to kindly tell them it's an airplane not a boat and the the other sections (wings, stabilizer's, etc.) are in my shop out back. I do all my fuselage work on my side of the garage just for clarification.

A "Boat" LOFL!

-Yellowhammer
 

Pops

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Living on an airport I don't see "fellow aviators " much different. Most might have an airplane but they are not airplane lovers (aviators), and its dust covered and haven't been started in 10 years and don't care. You could land the Spirit of St Louis on the field and most couldn't care less and wouldn't walk 20' to look at it. If it didn't say "Spirit of St Louis on the side, they wouldn't know what it was.

Have one neighbor that I can talk "airplane" with. We are the 2 " airplane nuts" that live at the airport. He is a retired airline capt and restores old airplanes and buys and sales old airplane parts.
This site is the only other place.
 
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Aerowerx

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Marion, Ohio
It is always a good idea to know where your property line is. Around here you can't place anything closer than 3 feet to the line, IIRC.

Read a story once about a guy that lived in a suburban neighborhood.

The house on the street behind his had a couple of kids, so this neighbor put up a playground set in their yard. It was entirely in their yard, but...

The person telling the story wanted to put up a fence. Guess what happened. It ended up with the slide on the playground set ended right at the fence with inches to spare.

Did I mention the playground set was set in concrete?

KNOW YOUR LINES!
 

Pops

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The old saying that "good neighbors are hard to find" couldn't be more true. I now live in a subdivision. I have been quite fortunate to have excellent neighbors over the years. Two of my neighbors who were older widowed lady's whom adopted me as a second grandson so to speak, passed away sadly. The neighbors on my port side is solid gold and love them like family.

When the other neighbors passed, their homes were sold by their children and two became rental home's after they were purchased by the current landlords.. I would like to tell you that they were careful in whom the sold and rented to but that's just not the case. My block went from peaceful and easy going to all sorts of antics that I am certain you can imagine.

I have gotten to the point where I just keep to myself and when a new set of neighbors moves in my family and I gather by the window and ask ourselves who long they will last. Normally we would go over and introduce ourselves and take along some May-haw Jelly my wife makes as a house warming gift.

Not anymore. I have found that some people are just not worth getting to know. Being a country boy, I am used to my "neighbors" being my family members and our homes are situated a country mile apart. I sure miss living in the sticks. Always something to do. Here on my 1.5 acres of land I just do yard work which I enjoy immensely. It is my therapy after a day of teaching knuckle heads.

Maybe one day a fellow aviator will move next door but I doubt it. Passers by stop often to inquire on what type of "boat" I am building. I have to kindly tell them it's an airplane not a boat and the the other sections (wings, stabilizer's, etc.) are in my shop out back. I do all my fuselage work on my side of the garage just for clarification.

A "Boat" LOFL!

-Yellowhammer
That is why an unfinished fuselage is called "in the boat stage".
 

pfarber

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Feb 21, 2019
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Dollywood
Actually there is, google "adverse possession". Basically it means that if somebody occupies your land for some period of time, openly, without permission, continuously, they can claim it.

My land has an odd bend in one boundary. Seems a neighbor built an extension onto his house which was close to the property line; the extension was over the line. The previous owner of my land said he had to tear it down or buy 1/4 acre... he bought it.
This. The deed is not the do all end all of land rights.
 

Aerowerx

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Marion, Ohio
Actually there is, google "adverse possession". Basically it means that if somebody occupies your land for some period of time, openly, without permission, continuously, they can claim it.
Prior to WW2, On the east end of Columbus Ohio there was a road with a bend in it. The city wanted to straighten out the bend, but there was a house in the way. So they bought the house and gave the people a deadline to move out.

WW2 started and everyone got busy. Several years later, after the war, the city went to the people and said they were ready to tear the house down. To make a long story short, both the bend and the house are still there (as of 40 years ago---the last time I was past it). Seems the people claimed "adverse possession", and the property values had gone up to where the city couldn't afford to buy them out.
 

Pilot-34

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Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
Prior to WW2, On the east end of Columbus Ohio there was a road with a bend in it. The city wanted to straighten out the bend, but there was a house in the way. So they bought the house and gave the people a deadline to move out.

WW2 started and everyone got busy. Several years later, after the war, the city went to the people and said they were ready to tear the house down. To make a long story short, both the bend and the house are still there (as of 40 years ago---the last time I was past it). Seems the people claimed "adverse possession", and the property values had gone up to where the city couldn't afford to buy them out.
That doesn’t sound right ?
You see in most places adverse possession does not apply to the government.
 

TFF

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Memphis, TN
For city infrastructure, they have eminent domain. For derelict property to sell, they would use adverse possession.
 

rsrguy3

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Eden
Actually there is, google "adverse possession". Basically it means that if somebody occupies your land for some period of time, openly, without permission, continuously, they can claim it.

My land has an odd bend in one boundary. Seems a neighbor built an extension onto his house which was close to the property line; the extension was over the line. The previous owner of my land said he had to tear it down or buy 1/4 acre... he bought it.
In most states adverse possession only works if the land pirate pays the taxes for multiple years. Where I live it's 7 years.
 

Bigshu

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In most of the states I’ve checked paying taxes has nothing to do with it.
If the one is a land pirate the other is a land wastrel
I'm confused by this. Are you saying the person using land they don't own (the pirate) is the good guy, and the landowner (the wastrel) is the bad guy? Maybe he wants to keep his land undeveloped. Maybe something is keeping him from making productive use of the land, like finances. I don't like infringement on private property, by individual or government.
 

Pilot-34

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Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
That’s not how adverse possession works . In a successful adverse possession case the wastrel claims that the property is his but yet for a term of 21 years they haven’t noticed that someone else is openly possessing and using the property.
While the good man that you’re calling a pirate has openly in full view of everyone put the land to good use.

Often adverse possession cases are about clearing up a missing piece of paper and a confused legal ownership.

Perhaps the simplest case is when grandpa A gives friend B apiece of property. just gives it to him and then 30 years later wastrel grandchild while going through grandpa A’s estate looking for breadcrumbs fines a deed to the property and thinks he owns it.
 

rsrguy3

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It's different in every state, as I mentioned earlier. Here it is 7 years and you must pay taxes on the piece your possessing, at least that's what was taught 15 years ago.

 

reo12

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The taking of land by adverse possession laws vary by state. In Michigan the requirement for adverse possession is 15 years. The adverse claim and use of the land has to be open and notorious and without pause. The courts are making it harder to claim land in this manner - at least in my region. It used to be that you could simply file a land title and start paying taxes on a piece of land. That made it much easier to successfully claim land by adverse possession as the payment of property taxes is a obvious intent to show ownership. The taxing authorities are now making it harder to file such a land claim by requiring that the ownership of the land follows a chain of custody.

Decades ago I remember seeing that a person made a sign using the side of a wood cable spool that simply stated his name and it was hung on a roadside fence along an overgrown field. A vehicle sized opening was cut in the fence. They drove through the opening - turned 90 degrees to a mowed spot where they placed a tent. This made it difficult to see the tent from passing cars. The cut fencing was reworked into a simple gate. Then a few years later a pickup truck type camper was placed there. The cut fence gate was changed to a chain. After a few years the trailer was changed to a newer - larger unit. I noticed they had put up a simple wire fence and then the following year place a garden on the back portion of the enclosed area. Then I noticed a temporary power pole was set to supply the trailer with power. The sign was repainted to be more visible. Then eventually I saw they were building a small geodesic dome home there. Having a business put me in contact with a number of folks and I found out that the actual land owner lived some 2.5 hours away. This person had "staked" his claim by posting the sign and living there part time. Eventually they had met the 15 years of use required for adverse possession and sued the rightful land owner for adverse claim of the land. Eventually they were successful in claiming a number of acres of the property and were finally building a home on the land they took from it's rightful owner.
 

Pops

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In my state a lot of land are old farms willed to family members that lives in other states. You will see "no trespassing" signs and the land borders marked with a large round purple or blue paint marks on trees. Does not have to be fenced. Take pictures, and have proof in case someone takes the signs down. Westvaco Co owns 10K acres of pulp wood land close to me. It is open for public hunting.
My daughter lives on a mountain ridge on her private road with a locked gate from another private road then to the public road. All of her land is posted and marked with paint marks on trees.
 
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bmcj

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I saw that happen if a small town in the Sierra Mountains in California. Small town life was disrupted by wealthy SF Bay Area people who discovered the little town and started buying and building there. Some were fine and adapted to the small town lifestyle, but others were obnoxious and contentious and thought they would bring ‘civilized ways (things like fences and traffic signals) to the backward mountain folk’.

One of the contentious type really made himself disliked by the locals and brought in construction crews to build a big fancy house up there next to the Sheriff’s homesite. The guy having the house built had a very bad attitude and made a real pain of himself. The Sheriff watched as the land was cleared and the house was built. On the day of the final inspection, the sheriff and some other locals dropped in on the inspection with documentation proving that half of the new house sat on his (the Sheriff’s) property. The Bay Area resident was given no choice but to demolish the new structure.
 
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Riggerrob

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In many jurisdictions, only licensed surveyors are allowed to plant or remove survey markers. IOW an amateur moving survey markers is committing a crime punishable by fines or jail time.
 
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