Lam Aileron

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Tom Nalevanko

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I believe that it is somewhat unique in the action in cruise, maneuvering and landing.

I find it somewhat strange that it was recently patented, many many years after it was disclosed. If anyone feels that it has significant value and does not want to license it, you can spend the $$$ to have the patent invalidated.

I believe that Greg Cole will present something on it at Tehachapi next week.

In aviation, all innovation is good innovation...
 

orion

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I also find the patent interesting (not to mention the web site's presentation) in that variations of this design have been in use for years, even by larger companies like Dornier. I even recall an illustration of something like this in one of my aircraft design textbooks. Maybe the difference is the wording or just simply a lack of due diligence by the patent staff but outside of the span-wise flap benefit and the split aileron capability, it just strikes me as a solution looking for a problem.

I'd be willing to bet that for most smaller applications the difference in performance will be rather minimal, especially when compared to the increased complexity of the build and of maintenance. I'd probably put this in the same category as a Wren Conversion for Cessnas - some benefit but doubtful if worth it in the long run.
 

Rienk

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I find it somewhat strange that it was recently patented, many many years after it was disclosed. If anyone feels that it has significant value and does not want to license it, you can spend the $$$ to have the patent invalidated.

I believe that Greg Cole will present something on it at Tehachapi next week.

In aviation, all innovation is good innovation...

Having filed patents, and also deciding not to, I know that a patent is unenforceable if it is filed for more than one year after public disclosure. Even if the patent office issued the patent, it is nearly impossible to enforce (I know the hard way)
 

Tom Nalevanko

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This could be a "I'm doing it for my dear departed dad" type of effort. Who knows? But it certainly looks that it was disclosed long before the patent and self-admittingly so.

I believe that the Lam company will be exhibiting at AOPA Long Beach in November. I will be sure to talk to them.
 

Topaz

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... or just simply a lack of due diligence by the patent staff...

There have been lots of articles in the tech world the last few years about the patent office. Apparently they're not even doing their own precedent searches anymore, in many cases, and simply rely entirely upon the inventor's claim that there's no "prior art" to their invention. Something happened in the patent office in the last decade. It's not what it was, and at this point it seems anyone can patent just about anything, "unique" or not, prior-art or not. Priority and patent rights fall to whichever party has the more powerful legal counsel in the ensuing infringment suits later on.
 

DaveK

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Apr 21, 2007
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I realized why this seemed so familiar. Other then seeing F-14s everyday for 20 years that have a similar system there was a Wittman Tailwind with a custom wing back in the 60's that had the identical setup to that shown on the Wanderer. Still trying to find the picture of it, but it had the spoiler on top of the outer portion of the full span flaps. It also strikes me as similar to the split rudder on the Shuttle which it sounds Lam worked on. So there is plenty of prior art which he was likely exposed to.
 
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