Just an interesting photo

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by blane.c, Mar 15, 2019.

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  1. Mar 15, 2019 #1

    blane.c

    blane.c

    blane.c

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  2. Mar 15, 2019 #2

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

    D Hillberg

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    Hay George hand propping for a restart in 3...2...1
    (if he can't get it started you're next Harry)
     
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  3. Mar 16, 2019 #3

    Aerowerx

    Aerowerx

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    That darn overbooking!
     
  4. Mar 16, 2019 #4

    TFF

    TFF

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    The sad part is at least one of the jumpers thought about if they could hit the starter and fling them. Those people are crazy; the only thing that stops them jumping is age and death.
     
  5. Mar 16, 2019 #5

    Pops

    Pops

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    True.

    Jump club at hanger next door to my hanger for many years. In the C-182, someone would try to grab the key out of the mag switch and turn it to OFF and then jump out with the key. Another would leave the airplane but grab the LG with their right hand and swing over to the left gear and then climb up on the left strut and tire and knock on your door window from the outside, etc, etc.
    They were to crazy for me, let someone else deal with them. John was about as crazy as the jumpers ( owner of jump school and club). One of the best pilots that I every flew with. Old time pilot that as been there and done that. I always said "If I was in an airplane and the wings fell off, I want John in the left seat, if anyone could find a way to fly the airplane, John could" . Coolest person under pressure I have ever saw.
     
  6. Mar 16, 2019 #6

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

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    Well, I'm old.
     
  7. Mar 16, 2019 #7

    TFF

    TFF

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    A friend has video of the King Air jump plane straight vertical dive passing the jumpers. Got to beat them down.
     
  8. Mar 16, 2019 #8

    TFF

    TFF

    TFF

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    But still crazy? Yes.
     
  9. Mar 16, 2019 #9

    Pops

    Pops

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    John would beat the jumps down a lot of the times.
    He would try to get down and load up another group as fast as possible. Also tried to land on runway 22 and turn off first taxi way at 800' to the ramp in the C-182 and a lot of times I would be landing on 4 at the same time as he was landing on 22, on the 4K long runway. The same as crop dusters coming in for a fill-up.
     
  10. Mar 16, 2019 #10

    Daleandee

    Daleandee

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    I've heard the golden rule for jumpers is; "if at first you don't succeed, then skydiving is not for you!" :roll:

    Dale
    N319WF
     
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  11. Mar 16, 2019 #11

    Riggerrob

    Riggerrob

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    The real reason Skydivers like to hang so many outside the door is to keep the group closer together when they exit and reduce the time build the free fall formation.
    One of the most demanding skydiving competitions is 10-way speed stars out a small door Beech 18. Ten way speed star rules usually require a no-show exit and the clock starts when ground-bound judges see the first jumper outside the airplane. The clock stops when judges see a complete 10-man formation. Competition scores were usually between 6 and 10 seconds. Since the last jumper is almost as far forward as the pilot he can be delayed several seconds.
    The other problem is the floor rising my and falling erratically as the weight and balance hangs quickly. After too many jumpers were injured - by hitting the doorframe - competition shifted to 8-way freefall formations and linked exits were allowed. The best 8-way teams could link four or five jumpers around the door with two or three floaters hanging onto the outside of the fuselage. This lead to STCs for extra steps and “floater handles.”
     
  12. Mar 16, 2019 #12

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Oh, jump schools always attract the most careful and rule-abiding folks in aviation.

    We had a jump school at California City on the same airport as the glider operation. The owner of the school was Van Prey. His son Van Jr. is now some sort of test pilot for Zenair, he's the guy in the CH-750 spin test video.

    Well Van Sr. was a larger than life guy in almost every way, good and bad. He was a really good stick, unquestionably. But I also saw him total a Blanik L-13 glider one day using nothing but air. He was out doing loops in mountain wave at 18K feet (no O2 by the way) using indicated redline as the entry speed. The airplane came back all beaten up with one stabilizer half at a different angle than the other one, and the wing skins wrinkled. Jack Arkovich, the local sheet metal expert was asked to come look at it, he flew his Maule in, walked around the Blanik once, and said "junk it'.

    Lots of stories in the jump world and the old Cal City crowd about Van Prey and his jump school. Two or three Cessna 206's with the same paint job, same N number, and same airworthiness certificate. Jump school business sold by Van, wait until the new owner fails, buy the school back at 20 cents on a dollar, build it back into a profitable business, then sell it again... lather rinse repeat at least two or three times as I had heard.

    So one day I'm flying my glider around, maybe 8 or 10K feet, which was 5500-7500 AGL, climbing in a thermal. The first thing I see is a Twin Otter diving past me vertically about 500 feet away, and I really thought I was seeing people die. Just about after I changed my shorts (not easy in a sailplane) I see 10 or 15 human bodies falling vertically past me.

    It was Van Prey racing the jumpers back down, taking a Twin Otter vertical at Vne to get back to the ground to get another Otter full of jumpers as fast as he could.

    As Archie and Edith used to sing... those were the days :)
     
  13. Mar 17, 2019 #13

    lr27

    lr27

    lr27

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    I was in a 206 once while it was being tested for use as a jump plane. Nothing quite as radical, just a 60 degree bank, but it was interesting to be in an airplane doing 2 g's for a long time. I have to admit that, if you're not used to it, looking at the horizon through the front window makes it look vertical.

    I hope that Twin Otter had really tight cowl flaps. Wouldn't there be severe shock cooling when flown this way?
     
  14. Mar 17, 2019 #14

    BJC

    BJC

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    My first jump was out the baggage compartment door of a 206.

    I encourage people to learn to fly in all dimensions. Not only is it fun and satisfying, but it makes one a better pilot.


    BJC
     
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  15. Mar 20, 2019 #15

    blane.c

    blane.c

    blane.c

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    Was looking at floats, these floats don't exactly inspire with confidence. Bride 13.jpg
     
  16. Mar 20, 2019 #16

    Riggerrob

    Riggerrob

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    Twin Otters, King Airs and other turboprops are popular with skydiving centres because they can dive steeply without worrying about shock cooling cylinders ..... Oh! .... Wait a minute ...... turboprops don’t have cylinders.

    If turboprops pull props back to “flat” they can dive as fast as skydivers and only slow down as they enter the landing pattern. Skydivers typically open around 3,000’ AGL, while most landing patterns are at 1,000’.

    Despite factories frowning on the practice, a few jump pilots pull props even farther back to “ beta” morie. Since beta provides reverse thrust to shorten landing rolls, they can point the nose straight down, without worrying about exceeding Vne.
    Another skydiving school removed the landing gear doors from their Westwind, Beechcraft 18, turboprop conversion. Missing landing gear doors made little different at low climb air speeds.When the pilot extended the main landing gear - during jump run - it improved balance. The increased drag of extended wheels allowed him to dive vertically and reduced the risk of forgetting to extend wheels for landing. Apparently the maximum speed for landing gear extension was based on the risk of bending doors.
     

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