Just a gyro sketch - not even serious

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speedracer

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Feb 4, 2020
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Any gyro pilots on this forum, if so, how difficult is it to transition from fixed wing to gyro? I've always like the idea of a gyro but have heard so scary stuff about flying them. And, isn't a gyro a completely different rating you would have to get?
Bob
My hanger partner did it the other way around. He had 600 hours in gyro's then did his first fixed wing solo in his Varieze with no problems.
 

Dan Thomas

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The Bensen gyrocopters were even simpler than that. Very little to them. Lots were built. Most used the military-surplus McCullough drone engine.

1617758446440.png
 

Riggerrob

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Sep 9, 2014
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Canada
Dear Tiger Tim,
Your sketch reminds us of an "artsy" version of the Bulldog that only had one pylon rising up from the vertical fin. It was green, in a fine-arts museum and I doubt if it ever flew. If they had tried to fly that "artsy" version, I suspect that the long pylon would flex too much.
OTOH Your sketch looks far more practical with two pylons: one going down to the firewall and the other carrying rotor loads to the tail-wheel.
 

girodreamer

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Nov 25, 2020
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Any gyro pilots on this forum, if so, how difficult is it to transition from fixed wing to gyro? I've always like the idea of a gyro but have heard so scary stuff about flying them. And, isn't a gyro a completely different rating you would have to get?
Bob
Hi Robert,
I am a gyro amateur builder owner gyro pilot,

in my club most of the giro pilots came from fixed wing and they had no problem in transitionning to gyro (and we are speaking about tens and tens of pilots)

there is absolutely nothing scary in gyroplane believe me, it is not touchy to fly a gyro at all

the flying envoloppe is only different from FW Acfts, zero G must be avoided and negative G is forbidden

practically it means that at the top of a steep ascent you have to pull back the throttle (to reduce thrust) and smoothly push the stick before pushing back the throttle

if you fly a gyro like a FW pushing the stick full throttle at the top of the ascent, you will put you at risk to bunt over and die ...
but you don't have to be afraid about this , it only happened before when pilots were not duall trained.

Fw pilots were building bensens gyros and then they would self teach after a couple of car towing sessions ... they would get surprised by the steepness of the ascent and then they would keep full throttle and push the stick hard ... in addition they did not have the large Horizontal stabilizers we all have now ...

today we avoid Zero G but appart from violent stunts the risk is nill

as for the rest, take off is different, the rotor is so draggy when the AOA is too big that it is easy to pass behing the power curve, then we can say that take off is a bit touchier then FW take off

pratically your gyro will lift off in 15 m but you will have to accelerate up to VS before ascending to avoid passing behing the power curve.

but landing is a a dream, when you touch the wheels your gyro speed is Zero ! or virtualy zero .. provided you don't land it like a FW .. again a question of training

the approach can be very steep wich make it possible to land on field with trees , fence , building around

a gyro can't stall, never, they can fly very slow ( but you must not fly them slow close to the ground except at one meter) because it is so easy to get behind the power curve that it would be dangerous

for example you aere flyin.. and you see a castle, or a cliff that you like, then it is a piece of cake to orbit arround, without any risk of stall

gyro are also not sensitive to turbulence, or way less sensitive let's say

in my aerodrome we are often the only one flying because of wind and turbulence

we used to be laughed at ...and now we are asked details about the activity

my two cents ( I am not trying to convince you to fly gyros, I love every form of flying)
 
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rotax618

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Oct 31, 2005
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Evans Head Australia
Many of the early autogyros had short wings, tailplane and rudder, the rotors were not controlled and only provided lift, control was provided by ailerons, elevator and rudder. The next development was tilting the rotor only for roll, pitch and yaw was provided by the tail. That arrangement provides less control, but I wonder if using the tail for pitch and yaw would make the gyro safer.
 

robertl

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May 5, 2017
Messages
269
Location
Heath Springs, S.C. USA
Hi Robert,
I am a gyro amateur builder owner gyro pilot,

in my club most of the giro pilots came from fixed wing and they had no problem in transitionning to gyro (and we are speaking about tens and tens of pilots)

there is absolutely nothing scary in gyroplane believe me, it is not touchy to fly a gyro at all

the flying envoloppe is only different from FW Acfts, zero G must be avoided and negative G is forbidden

practically it means that at the top of a steep ascent you have to pull back the throttle (to reduce thrust) and smoothly push the stick before pushing back the throttle

if you fly a gyro like a FW pushing the stick full throttle at the top of the ascent, you will put you at risk to bunt over and die ...
but you don't have to be afraid about this , it only happened before when pilots were not duall trained.

Fw pilots were building bensens gyros and then they would self teach after a couple of car towing sessions ... they would get surprised by the steepness of the ascent and then they would keep full throttle and push the stick hard ... in addition they did not have the large Horizontal stabilizers we all have now ...

today we avoid Zero G but appart from violent stunts the risk is nill

as for the rest, take off is different, the rotor is so draggy when the AOA is too big that it is easy to pass behing the power curve, then we can say that take off is a bit touchier then FW take off

pratically your gyro will lift off in 15 m but you will have to accelerate up to VS before ascending to avoid passing behing the power curve.

but landing is a a dream, when you touch the wheels your gyro speed is Zero ! or virtualy zero .. provided you don't land it like a FW .. again a question of training

the approach can be very steep wich make it possible to land on field with trees , fence , building around

a gyro can't stall, never, they can fly very slow ( but you must not fly them slow close to the ground except at one meter) because it is so easy to get behind the power curve that it would be dangerous

for example you aere flyin.. and you see a castle, or a cliff that you like, then it is a piece of cake to orbit arround, without any risk of stall

gyro are also not sensitive to turbulence, or way less sensitive let's say

in my aerodrome we are often the only one flying because of wind and turbulence

we used to be laughed at ...and now we are asked details about the activity

my two cents ( I am not trying to convince you to fly gyros, I love every form of flying)
Thanks girodreamer, I plan to attend the Bensen Days Fly In in Wauchuls, Fla. one of these days. Maybe I'll make the transition and fly both Gyros and my Cessna 150.
Thanks, Bob
 

jazzenjohn

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Oct 22, 2014
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24
Location
Milan, Mi. U.S.A.
Thanks girodreamer, I plan to attend the Bensen Days Fly In in Wauchuls, Fla. one of these days. Maybe I'll make the transition and fly both Gyros and my Cessna 150.
Thanks, Bob
There are a few other events you could get a good look at gyros if you want. The nearest one to you would be the twice a year Carolina Barnstormers events. They just had one a couple weeks ago ( I went to it myself) In fact, it was going on the day of your post! They have another in October. The PRA puts on one in Mentone Indiana in July either just before or just after Airventure. This year is after as is most common.
As far as transitioning from fixed wings, there are a few areas of difference. The controls on most gyros are somewhat faster so overcontrolling at first isn't uncommon. Rotor control at takeoff needs to be learned and the steepness of the approach and flaring for landing take some getting used to. Be prepared for the possibility of getting the Rotorcraft bug!
 

robertl

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Joined
May 5, 2017
Messages
269
Location
Heath Springs, S.C. USA
There are a few other events you could get a good look at gyros if you want. The nearest one to you would be the twice a year Carolina Barnstormers events. They just had one a couple weeks ago ( I went to it myself) In fact, it was going on the day of your post! They have another in October. The PRA puts on one in Mentone Indiana in July either just before or just after Airventure. This year is after as is most common.
As far as transitioning from fixed wings, there are a few areas of difference. The controls on most gyros are somewhat faster so overcontrolling at first isn't uncommon. Rotor control at takeoff needs to be learned and the steepness of the approach and flaring for landing take some getting used to. Be prepared for the possibility of getting the Rotorcraft bug!
When I got my PPL back in '73, the operator of the airport flew a gyro, I always thought it was so cool, and it has stayed with me all this time. I will check out the one in Carolina.
Thanks,
Bob
 

girodreamer

Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2020
Messages
39
I would add that not all gyros are similars .. you have to buy our build a modern gyroplane especially when it comes to monoseaters.

OK you can find dozens of old cheap widow makers gyros ... but we don't fly to die, we fly to fly again the next week end ..

when it comes to monoseaters, prefer the ones fitted with large Horizontal AIFOILED stabilizers ..

In America you have a bunch of good products :

Dominator the uggliest but most stable monoseater of the world, not produced anymore but easy to build with the help of any PRA chapter :


sportcopters .. awesome product


an other fantastic American product


gyros can't replace any FW .. in Groplane it is twice the power half the speed .. !! use them as pleasure machines to fly by 200 km around your base and don't put 120.000 dollars in an enclosed twin espicially if you weight more then 90kg ...

I love my gyro, but when I find myself at 60 km/h of ground speed with a 80 km head wind having to stay one hour in my bird , returning to my base 60 km away.. I hate it .. ( especially when you think that it drinks 20 liters an hour..)
 
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