Just a gyro sketch - not even serious

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Tiger Tim

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I’ve been doing a bunch of purging at home and it turns out I used to sketch a lot. Here’s one of a little autogyro made mostly of junk. Main structure looks like a big triangle made of some square extrusion, probably plywood blades, and I guess I was ahead of my time fifteen years ago with the little industrial V-twin. Check it out, I geared the prop speed UP from engine RPM I guess to deal with the small prop that looks better suited to an airboat or something. It’s got nothing but pure class from that Brooklands windscreen but the cut-down plastic lawn chair shows the whole thing was in jest.

Anyways, here it is:
1F2D68CE-CB9A-4590-A9BC-68206E6829AA.jpeg
 

JetProvost

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Good points: 1. Tractor which I believe is the only safe way to go with Gyros 2. Properly designed Wings saves day in event of Rotor failure. Cons: Tail dragger went out near end of WWII
 

Dan Thomas

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Cons: Tail dragger went out near end of WWII
Did they? Aviat still builds the Husky and the Pitts Special, both taildraggers. Maule still builds their taildraggers. The Carbon Cub is a current-production taildragger. Everything American Champion builds, all the Citabrias and Scouts, are taildraggers. Found Aircraft built their taildraggers up until they shut down in 2014. The Cessna 170, 180 and 185, built up until 1985 or so, are regularly restored. There are countless taildragger homebuilts. I have as much taildragger time as trike. Some bush operators want taildragger pilots and can't find them. At the flight school we had two Citabrias and constantly had calls from people wanting the training.

No, taildraggers didn't go out near the end of WWII. There were many aircraft manufacturers, most of them gone now, that built them for years after 1945. Cessna didn't build its first trike, the 172, until 1956. Piper built its first trike, the Tri-Pacer, in 1951.
 

Victor Bravo

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Well Tim, I have some good news for you. Your little "in jest" drawing is a lot closer to being viable than you had thought.

Telephone for Sockmonkey... Sockmonkey please pick up the white courtesy phone...
 

rtfm

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I have always loved tractor gyros. I spent close on a year dreaming, drawing, revising and starting again. I also love the wings. My many pre-prototypes all had wings. With a bit of fiddling and analysis I bet this could be a real contender and knock the oh-so-ugly (and expensive) current crop of pusher gyros out of the park. Oh - and did I mention they are EXPENSIVE? Your little tractor could be built at a fraction of what the current pushers are charging.

Basic A-frame with fore/aft beam to hold engine, seat and tail in place. And a clever way to add the required tail volume by the way. I can already see how to construct the fuselage out of routered parts so that everything fits together perfectly. Build the fuselage in a weekend. Wings another couple of weekends.

I like it a lot. If you don't care to do some serious thinking about the concept, I might just borrow it and develop drawings. What do you call it?
 
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rtfm

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Dorodango. I like it.
You've obviously thought about it more than I have, so any idea about dimensions? Maybe you didn't get that far, but no harm asking.
 

Victor Bravo

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Should probably have a cable coming down from the apex of the mast to each dihedral break at the main spar, to keep the size of the mast tubes reasonably small...
 

Tiger Tim

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keep the size of the mast tubes reasonably small...
I’d be inclined to go the other way, making the mast tubes (and keel not visible in the sketch) out of dimensionally stout square tubing with the thinnest wall I could reasonably get away with.

any idea about dimensions?
Not beyond picturing it small and toy-like. I imagine maybe a 500-600lb MTOW, rotor sized for that, tail moment sized as appropriate for the rotor and a long enough nose to balance it. The pilot would sit right around the CG.
 

rtfm

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I'm on the road at the moment, so this is a stolen minute at a roadside coffee joint.
Question:
Is there any particular reason why masts, keels etc are made from AL tubing? Could they not be made from wood?

Duncan
 

Tiger Tim

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Question:
Is there any particular reason why masts, keels etc are made from AL tubing?
Just the fantasy of simplicity, I guess. With aluminum you spec the right material, cut to length, and fasten the corner gussets. I picture an equivalent wooden structure being a fiddly box section thing that will take a lot more time and effort to make and probably come out heavier in the end anyways. My big aluminum triangle gyro could be built in a couple weekends if you wanted it bad enough.
 

Tiger Tim

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You see, I have this cnc router and...
I suppose, and once or twice I’ve driven a small nail in with the heavy pliers that happened to be in my hand at the time instead of picking up a hammer.

Large square tube just seems to be the best fit for the application. The reality is that wood needs to be either heavy or large to do the same job here and light enough steel tube would likely need to be some sort of truss. I took some inspiration from the Pitbull gyro which to me is elegance itself being essentially two tubes in a big upside down ‘T.’ Save your CNC for cutting out the metal gusset plates at the corners and for a wooden wing and rear fuselage fairing.
 

greedygrouper

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I’ve been doing a bunch of purging at home and it turns out I used to sketch a lot. Here’s one of a little autogyro made mostly of junk. Main structure looks like a big triangle made of some square extrusion, probably plywood blades, and I guess I was ahead of my time fifteen years ago with the little industrial V-twin. Check it out, I geared the prop speed UP from engine RPM I guess to deal with the small prop that looks better suited to an airboat or something. It’s got nothing but pure class from that Brooklands windscreen but the cut-down plastic lawn chair shows the whole thing was in jest.

Anyways, here it is:
View attachment 105242
I'm no engineer, haven't even built my first plane yet (two years away from starting a Tailwind W10 or BD-4 or something in between). But I have to tell you I'm kind of liking this. Why don't a couple of you smart guys put your heads together and come up with the plans for this? (I realize easier said than done)
 

robertl

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Heath Springs, S.C. USA
Any gyro pilots on this forum, if so, how difficult is it to transition from fixed wing to gyro? I've always like the idea of a gyro but have heard so scary stuff about flying them. And, isn't a gyro a completely different rating you would have to get?
Bob
 

Riggerrob

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I suspect that early Cierva and Pitcairn autogyros had vestigal wings for lateral (roll) stability. Eventually they learned how to build rotors stable enough that fixed wings were no longer needed.
 
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