J-1B 'DON QUIXOTE' ULTRALIGHT AIRCRAFT?

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Dillpickle

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How about the Janowski J2?
A little different layout with removable cantilever wings. Slick little airplane.

View attachment 53999View attachment 54000View attachment 54001View attachment 54003View attachment 54002
View attachment 54002
Plan are available in pdf.....

Bill
I keep picturing this in aluminum, with Sonerai wings. the spar carry through, landing gear mounts, and engine pylon are close enough to make it easier to tie all those loads in, a Sonex style break in the fuse taper could be done in the same location, extruded angle, flat sheets, Vw pusher with flywheel prop mount...
 

Aerowerx

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Marion, Ohio
There was an all aluminum J-1B built somewhere in Russia.

And one glass-foam sandwich one here in the USA, and an electric powered one. I have not communicated with the builders in several years so I do not know their status.
 

BJC

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I don’t think so. The “contact” button is dead, there are no dates on the web site.

I still want one.


BJC
 

MACOWA

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Hello' billyvray. Thank you so much for the J-2 plans. I sent some money to some Russian guys for a plan set but hav'nt heard from them for some time I have been collecting everything Janowski for the last number of years. I had a full set of blue print size plans For the J-1B printed up a couple of years ago they are in english. If the printer still has them on record I could make them available. I have had thoughts of mounting my 503 in the wing roots and belt it from the B box to put the thrust line at the t tail with a low C/G and reduced drag I see that its been done ! The use of thin composite panels instead of Polish plywood might get the little guy to 103 weight but how the heck would one slow it down. It's mighty good to be back. thank you one and all. Patrick.
 

Island_flyer

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Hello' billyvray. Thank you so much for the J-2 plans. I sent some money to some Russian guys for a plan set but hav'nt heard from them for some time I have been collecting everything Janowski for the last number of years. I had a full set of blue print size plans For the J-1B printed up a couple of years ago they are in english. If the printer still has them on record I could make them available. I have had thoughts of mounting my 503 in the wing roots and belt it from the B box to put the thrust line at the t tail with a low C/G and reduced drag I see that its been done ! The use of thin composite panels instead of Polish plywood might get the little guy to 103 weight but how the heck would one slow it down. It's mighty good to be back. thank you one and all. Patrick.
I bought a pdf from Russia as well, after unsuccessfully trying to find a set from the designer or original company. The Russian pdfs are incomplete and don't include an assembly manual with instructions, just the illustrations in Polish. Supposedly the J2 already met 103 requirements. Seems like a good candidate for electric power.
 

JohnB

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Patrick, if your printer still has the file just have him release them to who you designate , save you the time and shipping hassle. I would love a set. MIGHT build it. John B
 

Victor Bravo

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The J-5 Marco needs to be made available again. I would move heaven and earth to get my butt into one of those, especially the retract monowheel version. The original used the little KFM 25 or 30 HP engine, but today's Polini (or similar) would be PFC ! A compact, sporty little runabout burning a couple of gallons an hour, great visibility, and really cool looking.

Doug Crane are you listening?!? My 60th (#@&*$ birthday's coming up and you didn't gift wrap your J-5 for me as a present last year!
 

Gregory Perkins

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I guess no one remembers but there was a dealer in the USA that was putting together and selling kits for the J1-B. I think they sold slightly less than a dozen and several were built.
I am surprised that no one else sees the potential for ( I think ) an easy conversion to
a SeaPlane. Get rid of the landing gear and do whatever necessary to convert fuselage
to a boat hull. Certainly materials change and reinforcements as necessary and
a little hydrodynamic shaping to make the "boatability" more optimum whatever that means.
( I always like to remember that the Buchaneer UL Amphib took a mold of a JETSKI as a first start
to shape their hull. ) Also at one point specifically for the J6 and maybe some others, they
were converting Honda 50hp 4 stroke outboard motors and adding reduction drives which seemed to work extremely well. What a great idea. What other engines are designed to run full throttle for long durations ?
 

MACOWA

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Patrick, if your printer still has the file just have him release them to who you designate , save you the time and shipping hassle. I would love a set. MIGHT build it. John B
 

MACOWA

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Hello, JohnB. I just got back from Olympia, My printer did indeed have the plans on record. They don't release much of anything to anyone which is the way I like it. I had him add a set of J-1B plans to the last print job. send me a kneemail with a good shipping adress and I can get them to you. [email protected].
 

MACOWA

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I guess no one remembers but there was a dealer in the USA that was putting together and selling kits for the J1-B. I think they sold slightly less than a dozen and several were built.
I am surprised that no one else sees the potential for ( I think ) an easy conversion to
a SeaPlane. Get rid of the landing gear and do whatever necessary to convert fuselage
to a boat hull. Certainly materials change and reinforcements as necessary and
a little hydrodynamic shaping to make the "boatability" more optimum whatever that means.
( I always like to remember that the Buchaneer UL Amphib took a mold of a JETSKI as a first start
to shape their hull. ) Also at one point specifically for the J6 and maybe some others, they
were converting Honda 50hp 4 stroke outboard motors and adding reduction drives which seemed to work extremely well. What a great idea. What other engines are designed to run full throttle for long durations ?
 

MACOWA

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Hello Gregory. You are already there. I've been designing and building light fast boats for a couple of decades. Living in the south Puget sound area almost requires it. Besides it's pretty good money. It's my opinion that the Janowski fuselages are great little boats as they are. Actually using long narrow hulls in rough water gives one a certain perspective. the bottom fuse panel in both J-1B and especially J-2 are almost identical to my favorite slalom ski, both in elevation and plan view also in beam distribution fore and aft, even to the slight cusp in the run. The mono wheel landing gear of the J-2 if faired according to plans would provide the nesisary drag point to keep it on track while also providing the required lateral plane to prevent skidding. Adding any deadrise (V bottom) would be moot, only adding wetted surface. One wheel would also be a snap to turn around on the beach. I've made two attempts at converting outboard motors for aero use (4cyl mercury's) they never got farther than the bench. The cooling water when in marine use enters the block @ 40 to 60 degrees F an air cooled radiator runs at about 200 F. The coolant passages in the block are just too small. Attempts at an external bypass ended up with the hotspot/coldspot thing warping the block. Don't give up though, if someone could figure this one out theres a lot of really neat motors out there that run at an 80%+ duty cycle.
 

Island_flyer

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. . . I've been designing and building light fast boats for a couple of decades. . . .
I'd love to see an amphibious version of the J-2. Please make it so. :) I bought the plans for the Osprey 2 some years ago from the designer. But I realized it wasn't the project for me - too long to build, and special welding for the landing gear and some other components. It was probably the fastest homebuilt amphibian that was really successful. The Airshark was a beautiful aircraft and the designer(s) claimed it had a 200-mph top speed -- faster than a Piper Arrow with the same power, but I'm unaware of any examples built other than the prototype. The SeaRey is great, too, but ingress and egress are difficult. Maybe an amphibious J-2 could have small stub "wings" to serve as a step, similar those on the Icon or Avid Catalina amphibian.
 

Riggerrob

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I'd love to see an amphibious version of the J-2. ... Maybe an amphibious J-2 could have small stub "wings" to serve as a step, similar those on the Icon or Avid Catalina amphibian.
Those stub wings are primarily for lateral stability. They are also called sea-wings or sponsons.

Steps are a separate issue. They break the suction created by convex hulls sliding across the top of the water. Back during the 1920s an 1930s many speed boats were built with three or even four steps to reduce drag. Let's not kid ourselves, most of those "speedboats" smuggled rum Monday to Friday and only raced on weekends. Hah! Hah!
 

Island_flyer

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Steps are a separate issue. . .
Thanks Riggerrob. I should have clarified my comment regarding steps, as the word has a different, more common meaning when referring to water craft. I was thinking of a place to put your feet when getting into or out of the cockpit. Although the sponsons' primary purpose is to provide stability as you mentioned, they can be handy (footy?) for entry and exit. Some seaplanes are challenging, "Face away from the airplane, put your left foot on the tire, one hand here, the other there, swing your right leg over . . . no, don't put your weight there . . . " Seabees are much easier, but they're also a lot bigger. I'm guessing the Avid Catalina was easier than some. I was intrigued by your comments about three and four step hulls on some speedboats. I was unaware of that (probably beneficial with all that rum . . .) The designers of the Gweduck (Renton, WA) put a lot of thought into their hull design to reduce the drag and weight of water. They showed me a photo of a popular 4-place factory-built seaplane that still had water clinging to the fuselage shortly after takeoff. Although the water flows off quickly, it can be a hundred pounds or more of extra weight. For the Gweduck they designed channels to shed that water immediately. The proposed J-2 amphibian would be much smaller and lighter, so a simple hull design would be sufficient.
 

Riggerrob

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Yes dear Island flyer,
Sponsons/sea wings can assist passengers stepping onboard. Back during the 1930s, airlines flew large flying boats on long haul routes. They published pictures of passengers walking across sponsons and directly onto a dock.
I would prefer sponsons on my 2-seater flying boat (Dornier Libelle, Dornier S-Ray, Icon, etc.) for the same reason: ease of docking. Chen you consider that conventional tip floats interfer with docking.
My little amphib would have main wheels that half retract into sponsons, but leaving half of the tire exposed to serve as a bumper or fender.

Venting water from hull hydrodynamic steps is another challenge. Rumor has it that smart-alec Catalina pilots got a chuckle out of holding that water until they flew over a parade ground. Hah! Hah!
Grumman Mallard solved that problem by adding large drain tubes from main wheel wells down to the step.
There is also an STC for Seabees that vents air to the step. I have never heard how successful that is???????
 

Gregory Perkins

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May 25, 2019
Messages
140
Location
Atlanta
Yes dear Island flyer,
Sponsons/sea wings can assist passengers stepping onboard. Back during the 1930s, airlines flew large flying boats on long haul routes. They published pictures of passengers walking across sponsons and directly onto a dock.
I would prefer sponsons on my 2-seater flying boat (Dornier Libelle, Dornier S-Ray, Icon, etc.) for the same reason: ease of docking. Chen you consider that conventional tip floats interfer with docking.
My little amphib would have main wheels that half retract into sponsons, but leaving half of the tire exposed to serve as a bumper or fender.

Venting water from hull hydrodynamic steps is another challenge. Rumor has it that smart-alec Catalina pilots got a chuckle out of holding that water until they flew over a parade ground. Hah! Hah!
Grumman Mallard solved that problem by adding large drain tubes from main wheel wells down to the step.
There is also an STC for Seabees that vents air to the step. I have never heard how successful that is???????
____+++J-1 Float Plane-med.jpg
 
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