It's possible to learn to fly on a homebuilt airplane?

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TFF

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You get a LODA for the plane and the CFI gets a LODA for himself. All covered.

Finding a CFI to teach from scratch is hard. They usually have a career that takes precedence. A professional pilot never wants to explain an incident or accident. Can be career ending. For $10-20 an hour. Not worth it. I see CFIs doing biannuals and some transition training. You got to be a brother in law to get trained in a homebuilt. I think in general if someone says yes, they are a bad risk to teach. They for some reason came up with a different answer and you need to know why. They might feel people are needed to do this service, but more likely you will find the person is a cocky POS thinking they are the greatest pilot in the world. You will end up with a bent plane.

Insurance. No. You can go naked and risk it. I’m ok with that, but if you want even liability only, doubtful they will be ok with training or solo. Full coverage. No. Caveat, if you can afford obscene policy prices, they will. No budget answer.
 

rv7charlie

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In the interest of clarity, either the CFI or the a/c owner needs a training LODA for training in the owner's a/c. Both is ok, but not required.

A CFI doing transition training in his own experimental a/c, and charging for both the training and the use of his experimental a/c, requires a completely different LODA. And that LODA does not authorize any training other than transition training.

Parsing the above, it says that compensation cannot be provided for any use of an experimental a/c, other than transition training. (It should be noted that the FAA has a very nuanced view of how both compensation and 'for hire' use are defined.)
 

speedracer

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The title: "Is it possible to learn how to fly ON a homebuilt airplane?" Like this? Mike Melvill and Doug Shane both flew this for Burt. Doug described it as "A new and unwelcome experience".
 

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skydawg

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I lent my c172 experimental out to a buddy and helped him with his commercial training and he took and passed his FAA check ride in it. Another completed her private pilot training and check ride in it this week, as well. I got the LODA for the airplane and no problems. Our c172-V8 cost a lot less to fly then they were renting one for, $30/hr vs $150/hr, so they were happy flying experimental and completed the training and check ride at a fraction of the cost. Next for her is instrument In it.
 

jedi

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If I were wanting PP instruction in an E-AB, I would look for a retired airline pilot who knows how to fly GA aircraft and has a current CFI.

There are several here in our airpark.

BJC

This is the internet. Anyone can post. There are good guys and bad guys out here. There are good sites and scams.

This is a very good site and BJC is someone you can trust. In the copied post he describes what I do.

You can see from the response to your OP (Original Post) that you have hit a hot spot here. There are a lot of variables and strong opinions.

If you would like to talk about details PM (Personal Message) me to discuss in more detail assuming you are in the US.
 
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skydawg

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There is a lot of mis info about training in EXP, much of which is misinformation and heresay. The FAA policy is training is allowed, and checkrides are allowed. However, there is no requirement for a CFI to perform training, or for FAA to conduct checkrides in an EXP. The references for this are on corsairv8.com.

A young lady just completed her PP training and check ride in our EXP c172……60 hours of flight time, FAA check ride examiner fee, and 30 hrs of CFI cost less than $4k, which is a lot less than renting or owning a c172 with original engine. So, to answer original topic, you can do all in an an EXP and it would be a neat experience in an aircraft you built, but…… you may have a problem finding a CFI or examiner to go up in it, especially right after you completed it.

My suggestion, find an EXP that’s been around for a while with a couple of 100 hours on it, preferably a recognized and proven kit plane with a clean bill of health from someone experienced with that type. Get your PP, then build something.
 
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TFF

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The real problem with the training in a homebuilt is not the homebuilt part per say, it’s the cheap part. The question is usually attached to a KR-2 or a VP-2 where cheap is trying to outweigh learning. Name an Experimental Amateur Built plane as lovely as a 172 to learn in. A Bearhawk would work, not cheap though. RV 10, hot but plenty doable, there are SR-22s used for primary training if you got the bucks. Jack Roush learned in a Barron. I know Dads teaching kids to fly from their Pitts.

The issue is squeezing two people into the classroom. Especially a CFI who is non initiated in homebuilts and a student who has desperately put themselves in a corner of the wrong cheap plane. That it’s self is pushing boundaries. The original homebuilt formula was pick an engine and build a half size plane. Flybaby, first Pitts, Tailwind various versions of a half a Cub from where the engines came from. Technically Taylorcraft for the Pitts. STOL people are building floaters, but they are usually smaller than a Cub. Room for two people to move around. That’s the key. Hard to beat a Cessna for that issue. It’s not homebuilts, it’s finding an understanding CFI and the student having a reasonable training aircraft. A T-51 is not the right answer.
 
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