It's possible to learn to fly on a homebuilt airplane?

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MaxLA

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Having a glass panel and an in flight adjustable prop may give her what she needs for the "complex" 10 hour requirement, otherwise she would have to rent that time in a suitable airplane.
I thought RV-9s had flaps. My airplane has retractable gear, flaps, and a light blue knob. So it's "complex." But with 168 hp at max continuous power, it's a tad shy of "high performance." I know the FAA has made a lot of accommodations recently because of the dearth of complex singles, and that's kind of a mixed bag. Sometimes they allow pilots to simulate retractable gear procedures on fixed gear aircraft, and sometimes they don't. They wouldn't let me run my O-360 at 2700 rpm and say I was simulating having a 224 hp engine which was throttled back to 75% power.
 

KeithO

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Look, I'm the geezer who is mid 50's and has high blood pressure. If I didnt fail my medical now there is a good chance I could fail it in the not too distant future. So for me personally, I cant see the time/money investment as being appropriate for the amount of time I may get to use a PPL. Now my wife is 28 years old and in the prime of her life. She has no such limitations, thus the investment to make it possible for her to be certified is appropriate. Furthermore as a woman and a minority, there is a good chance that if she can get enough time under her belt and up to Commercial rating that she may actually get an aviation job.

So, the Titan gives her something (very) economical to fly right now. She could fly 10 hours a week and it wouldnt make a dent. By the time the RV-9A is built she should have gained a tremendous amount of experience already. So she should be ready to step up to something with a much bigger performance envelope, higher speed, longer range. Totally different kind of avionics compared to the Titan. In flight adjustable prop. We will own it outright, no note, only as little insurance as needed (liability). I will have the repairman certificate for it. Honda 4 cylinder engine, if it dies I will probably have a spare ready to drop in, they are so cheap (less than $600). Once again she should be able to do national scale cross countries for close to the price of gas. Get plenty of experience with weather, unfamiliar airports etc. Flying in different seasons. Obviously its not equipped for icing so no suicide missions. Some of the flights I have watched from continental Europe across the Atlantic were hair raising to say the least, freezing fog down to nearly the ground, blizzard immediately after landing etc.

Once she is flying the RV-9 then I should finally have a chance to do my LSA training in the Titan and be able to do some fun flying within its capabilities. If we want to go on a "sky trip" as opposed to "road trip", she is pilot in command of the RV-9. We will see where it goes from there.
 

rv7charlie

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If she absolutely positively knows that she wants a career as a pilot, then dragging it out might be false economy. Right now might be the 1st time in memory where the 'pilot shortage' is a real thing. Past shortages were largely pay shortages; there were plenty of qualified pilots but the entry level pay was so low that they could get into almost any career and make more money. Today, it seems to be very different. $500/day is pretty common for right seat in corp stuff (do the math). There are stories of the freight companies paying 6 figure *signing bonuses*. Getting into the system with easy entry now would mean either some seniority (if with a big company) or an experience advantage, when the inevitable reductions in force happen.

Just something to think about...
 

KeithO

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What we are not going to do is get a $100k loan to throw at a flight school or university. Throwing some money (cash) at a pair of experimental, yes. There will be something to sell at the end if it does not turn into a career and a lot of new experiences gained in the process. So I cant see how we can lose with our current path. She currently works in a law enforcement type role and is likely to continue that in future so maybe some opportunities will come up in search and rescue, fire fighting or whatever that is in some way related to her current job as opposed to an airline.
 

Dana

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Look, I'm the geezer who is mid 50's and has high blood pressure. If I didnt fail my medical now there is a good chance I could fail it in the not too distant future. So for me personally, I cant see the time/money investment as being appropriate for the amount of time I may get to use a PPL.
High blood pressure, if reasonably controlled, is not an issue as long as you're not taking one of the medications that the FAA doesn't like. Probably a majority of all pilots over 50 have high blood pressure.

Remember, you only have to pass the FAA medical once, then you can go basicmed. So set up an appointment with an AME, explain your concerns, and tell him you only want a "consult", then if he says you'll pass you can give him the medexpress code number, then you can go PP and have more options in the future. If the doctor says you wouldn't pass, or would require an expensive special issuance, he doesn't punch in the code number, the application expires and you can still fly as a SP.
 

KeithO

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For now I have no time for training, have several ongoing projects and will be working to lose another 60lb. I lost close to that last year when I had the Delta variant (in 4 weeks) but once I finally got over my stomach bug I was literally starving for months... If I can loose the weight the blood pressure issue may resolve on its own. But appreciate the advice Dana, something to consider...
 

Turd Ferguson

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I should have stated that if you knew or should have known that you have a condition that would prohibit your obtaining a Basic Med certificate it is just as much of a violation to fly as if you knew or should have known that you have a condition that would prohibit your obtaining a Third Class.
You are correct for any type of medical certificate including basic med. For example, a person that has had a myocardial infarction is not eligible to hold any class of medical certificate, including basic med. For basic med, the applicant and Dr. will have to falsify the 8700-2 form under medical history. The only way to get a medical is to go through special issuance.
No certificate, i.e. drivers license medical and you can probably get away with it.
 
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Turd Ferguson

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Look, I'm the geezer who is mid 50's and has high blood pressure.
If you can average 155/95 or less in the office you're golden. And if on meds, make sure it's meds allowable to the FAA.

The only wrench in the works for training in a homebuilt is making sure you can find an instructor will do it and then finding an examiner for the checking part may be a challenge. Most won't do a checkride in an experimental.
 

Tom DM

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What we are not going to do is get a $100k loan to throw at a flight school or university. Throwing some money (cash) at a pair of experimental, yes. There will be something to sell at the end if it does not turn into a career and a lot of new experiences gained in the process. So I cant see how we can lose with our current path.

The journey is the reason for doing, the end-result -whether there is or not- is just a bonus.

Some people calculate, spreadsheets by the dozen, they buy a airplane or a car , haven't paid it yet and are already worrying about the price it will be worth x years down the line. Even worse are those buying for "an investement"

My method: the moment the wheels leave tarmac or grass, the plane is worth 0 Euro. When after landing the canopy-cover goes over it and I wish it good-night, from pure happiness (I think) the plane rewards its pilot by becoming worth something again. In between both situations we had fun.

As to loans, going into debt... I dislike those with the same passion as bank / marketing / sales-people.
 

Tom DM

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That's what I like about this group. No discrimination, we insult everyone equally.
Wowbagger , the Indefinitely Prolonged, one of Universe's very small number of immortal beings whose purpose in life is to personally insult everybody in the Universe. (*)

(*) Shamelessy quoted from my bible!

Do not panic!
 

ToddK

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I though about doing this, didn't. After getting my ticket and rebuilding an airplane, I would not recommend it.

A few years, a few thousand dollars, and hours of building, and you have machine you buit setting in front of you. You going to risk wrecking it in your fist 100hrs of flying?

I know a guy who had an instructor destroy a wing before he ever had a lesson.

Let the flight school absorb the risk.
 

KeithO

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Haven't heard of any airplane being wrecked yet at the flight schools in town. So I guess it happens a lot less often that some may think.

35 years ago my day job was sweeping roads and 2 tracks in Namibia and Angola for landmines. Put 2800 miles on my boots in 9 months doing that. No body armor, helmets face shields or any of that stuff. I think my concern for bending the airplane is a bit less than yours.

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Xmas Eve 86, near the town of Nehone, Angola. Vehicl behind me hit a landmine right after a thunderstorm when the officer got confused and took a track that was NOT cleared for mines...
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Doing a self recovery after after waiting 3 days without water for a recovery team that never showed up.
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Ever mindful that some of these might turn up at any moment, their air base was only 50-80 miles away
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Also these stationed at the same base. could reach us in minutes
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Malish

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I knew the guy who owned the Pa-28RG Arrow and his wife learned to fly and got her PPL in this aircraft. If someone own experimental aircraft, he can legally learn to fly in it with licensed instructor.
 

MaxLA

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Doesn't the whole legality of teaching in an experimental hang on the principal of compensation? If you can find someone to donate their time?
As I read it one of you need a LODA if someone is getting compensated. Other people on this board have received them without undue hassle or delay.

My overly optimistic friend Polly Anna says the Feds are using LODAs to prevent for-hire-sightseeing-ops doing business as "fake" schools.

In related news, the FAA is turning over all flight following records pertaining to a Mr. S. Clause to the IRS. Since they both consider cookies and milk to be compensation. Rudolph, please switch that noseBeacon to 1200.
 
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