Quantcast

Interesting Subaru Site

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

n925cu

New Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2004
Messages
4
The shipping crate was paid for but not needed as the engine was picked up by the purchaser. He never got a credit for the shipping crate.

Good catch.
 

Spinnetti

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Messages
95
Location
Dallas TX, USA
Originally posted by Captain_John
Now, this guy sports some pretty compelling evidence for the Subaru junkie!!!

...especially the supercharged variant!

I am a bit of a stick in the mud, though. A Lycoming is simple and tested over time. Hmmmmm, at least I don't have to make a decision tonight!

:D CJ
I like this stuff, but the super charger makes no sense to me. The WRX and STI are turbo from the factory - why change that?
 

StRaNgEdAyS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2003
Messages
816
Location
Northern NSW Australia
The main reason for looking at alternatives to the factory turbos is that the factory units are designed to run boost for short periods of time only.
In an aircraft installation there are two main factors that need to be considered. Firstly, these turbos will be running at a boost condition for a greater length of time, much more than they were designed for so your bearing life will be reduced requiring either upgraded bearing units of shorter service intervals. Secondly, due to the longer high output duty cycles your Turbine Inlet Temperaures will be higher than those seen in the automotive units (espescially so in rotary engines), leading to more bearing related issues as well as longevity issues of the turbine wheel.
The solution for this is to either spend big bucks on aircraft optimised units or to switch to supercharging.
 

mikemill757

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 29, 2008
Messages
50
Location
Portland metro, Oregon
I've been researching Subaru conversions, and RAM engines seems to me to be the best bet - info@ramengines.com I've read some not-so-complimentary comments about Eggenfellner, esp. his attitude towards customers, lack of testing (re-drives) and I believe he now sells only the 6 cyl. engines.
 

orion

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2003
Messages
5,800
Location
Western Washington
Although I haven't dug into this in any level of detail, I like the Ram engines also. The don't seem to push any envelopes and overall seem to have a very reasonable and clean approach to their products. I also like the redrive unit they use (which I think is from Australia?). It looks clean and well designed for the application.

If anyone has had first hand experience with this company, please chime in.
 

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,516
Location
Fresno, California
I have not read through this whole thread, so what I say here may have already been covered.

I understand that the Subaru makes a decent engine, depending on who does the conversion. However, the cost savings of using this engine is usually offset by the need to add a reduction drive to it. Costs for the redrive can run $4,000-$8,000 or more, and many of the redrives are plagued with vibration and reliability problems. In addition, the Subaru engine is water cooled and requires the added weight and complexity of a water cooling system.

If you are looking for something in the 80 or 120 horsepower range, many people are pulling out their Rotax' and Subaru engines and installing the Australian-made Jabiru engines. The Jabiru engine, so far, is proving to be a very lightweight, capable, reliable engine. It is air-cooled and factory support is said to be excellent. Cost brand new for the 80 HP is about $13,000 and the 120 HP is about $18,000. Of course, you can find used ones from time to time for less.

Bruce :)
 

Topaz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Log Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
14,247
Location
Orange County, California
...Cost brand new for the 80 HP is about $13,000 and the 120 HP is about $18,000....
I think that's the biggest problem wiht the Jaibiru series - the cost. When I was working on an LSA design, $18,000 was more than I was able to budget for the entire airplane.

<rant mode>

I completely understand the fact that these are limited production engines in a litiginous market, and that all the development cost must be borne upon that limited run, but $20,000 for a 120Hp engine is absurd, especially when non-certificated aircraft engines of equal power are available for a third of that price. I know why the costs are where they are, but like many, I think there has to be a better way.

</rant mode>
 

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,516
Location
Fresno, California
I think that's the biggest problem wiht the Jaibiru series - the cost. When I was working on an LSA design, $18,000 was more than I was able to budget for the entire airplane.
I agree that $13K-$18K is steep for most of us... that is why the Jabiru is only on my wish list as opposed to the nose of my Avid Flyer. One of my reasons for qouting prices though was to point out that by the time you add redrive and cooling system, the Subie may not be much less than the Jab, (but it is definitely heavier).

...and I say again, there are used Jabirus for sale from time to time for less than the factory new price. One (or at least I) can only hope that as the Jabiru becomes more popular, the economy of scale will bring the price down.

Bruce ;)
 

Topaz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Log Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
14,247
Location
Orange County, California
...One (or at least I) can only hope that as the Jabiru becomes more popular, the economy of scale will bring the price down.
I hope so too. From everything I hear, it's a great engine, but outside my budget for any kind of forseeable future.

I've always been a bit leary of buying used for something like airplane engines. I never know what the person (or idiot) before me did to it. I may be too cautious in that approach, or maybe not. :ermm:
 

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,516
Location
Fresno, California
Hey Topaz,

I see your sailplane avatar. Are you a soaring enthusiast too... perhaps a member of the Orange County Soaring Association? I was a member of OCSA dating back to 1980 when they were at Perris Airport.

Sorry about going off-topic folks... I promise this will be the last time (until the next time). :gig:

Bruce :)
 

Topaz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Log Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
14,247
Location
Orange County, California
I am a glider pilot indeed - okay, a student glider pilot, but solo-rated in the 2-33 and 1-26, about to transition into a 1-34, and expect to finish up my PPL-G in the next few months. Mostly I've got to get off my lazy butt and get the written out of the way - I've already got 3h+ flights under my belt and would've had my Bronze if I'd had a barograph in the plane on one particular flight. -sigh- I've got about 65h SEL as well, mostly in C-152's and Tomahawks, and a very little bit of time in ultralights out at Perris. I'm with that bunch of guys on the Ortega Ridge - the Lake Elsinore Soaring Club. OCSA looked like fun, but Elsinore is a shorter drive for me than Hemet (where the OCSA is flying these days) and I do love the ridge. :gig: If you're ever out our way, stop by and say hello! Are you still flying motorless? What did you fly 'back in the day'? We can take this PM or on another thread in the "Soaring" section, so as not to hijack this thread.
 
Last edited:

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,516
Location
Fresno, California
Hi Topaz,

Yes, the Elsinore shearline is great flying. Check you inbox soon because I am taking the rest of my response to PM... talk to you there.

Bruce :)
 

Kiwi303

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2015
Messages
253
Location
En Zed. Aka The Shire.
Reviving an older thread

Doing your own is certainly an option, especially if you get an engine from one of the Japanese used engine importers rather than a wrecking yard. As I hear the story, the Japanese emission requirements are so strict that every car owner has to get a new engine at about 25k to 30k miles in order to meet the extreme standards. As such, many of the imported engines have extremely low miles - barely broken in.
Actually no, they don't get a new engine, they get a new car. The nice new low miles japanese engines are removed from cars before the cars are scrapped and sent to the iron works to become new ingot and eventually new products.

Their tax regime increases extremely to register their cars as time goes on. to purchase a yearly tag for a 70's collectable like a 240Z in Japan costs more than the purchase price of a BMW new with an inital 3 year tag.

As such the turnover of cars is fast and old cars are rare, being exported or stripped and recycled rather than passed down to younger or poorer drivers and kids.
 

mcrae0104

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
3,446
Sounds like Cash for Clunkers in reverse. Anybody who thinks this is a good idea should read up on the fallacy of the broken window.

[rant] Imagine the benefit to the economy if we just charged a tax on old houses, computers, mattresses, or even paper clips. Manufacturing would go bananas, and China wouldn't stand a chance against the free world! [/rant]
 

BoKu

Pundit
HBA Supporter
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
2,754
Location
Western US
And just as an FYI, someone has a 3 l Jabiru engine on the Indianapolis craigslist for $2000.

Derswede
I looked, and didn't find a Jabiru. What did come up was a Subaru 6-cylinder. Interesting, but not a Jabiru by any stretch of the imagination.
 
Top