Intake Gaskets

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103

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I am in the process of replacing the rear main seal on my Cygnet. This required dismounting the engine and pulling the accessory case off. To remove the CHT sensors on my heads I had to remove the manifold.

The Thick fiber/paper ~3/32" was baked thin and brittle. Almost no torque on the manifold bolts.

I have ordered and will try some steel crush gaskets next.

I read some add some red rtv to these . What is the practice a thin coat on the side facing the head or both?

The seal began to make a mess on this flight with a simulated lost engine, good practice...

'Cleaned it up" and flew one circuit staying close ~6minutes and confirmed oil was migrating out on the back of the flywheel. I grounded the plane and began to remove the engine and order parts and assemble the specialty tools. 250lb torque wrench, 36mm 12 point socket, Flywheel removal tool.

For the intake what is the practice a thin coat of red High Temp RTV on the side facing the head, both, None?

Side note:
Mofoco sold me a rear seal but sold the last flywheel clamp mere hours before my arrival. Fred Keip of Sonerai fame came to the rescue. Spent a enjoyable hour in his shop and learned a hat trick how to tension wires in a wing without expensive turnbuckles. A very cool hat trick! He is building a single seat preceptor pup with spars and structures from the 2 place. Kinda like Pops SSSC only with a 4130 fuselage.

As much as I like Geodetic wings I think a few pounds could be saved grafting Preceptor wings on a 202 fuselage built like a Super Koala. 123square feet of wing, 1834VW under 425lbs empty would be the goal

Regards

Matt
 

Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
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Spent a enjoyable hour in his shop and learned a hat trick how to tension wires in a wing without expensive turnbuckles. A very cool hat trick!
I know it's off topic but I, and probably a lot of others here, would like to know more about his method of turnbuckle-less tension adjustment.

Regarding the intake gasket: you don't need the red RTV. It dissolves in gas. I've never had a leak using only the bare metal gasket and I've probably installed north of a thousand over the years. This excludes missing manifold ears that have been deformed by others using the fiber gaskets. Double check that this hasn't happened to your manifold as well. Doesn't matter if it's a thick aluminum casting or a stamped metal flange - they both can bend.
 

103

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"Spent a enjoyable hour in his shop and learned a hat trick how to tension wires in a wing without expensive turnbuckles. A very cool hat trick!...
I know it's off topic but I, and probably a lot of others here, would like to know more about his method of turnbuckle-less tension adjustment."...HOT WINGS

OK!
Well Fred did not claim it to be his own development. He was great friends with Ken Flaglor I suspect some transfer of ideas was likely between these two friends.

Super slick and right in front of everybody. You will say why didn't I see that. Save $500 in turnbuckles if you have 4 bay wings.

Fred would trammel and true the wing starting at the root. Swage one end of the cable to a fitting near a compression strut. Fish the other end through the opposite fitting thimble and swage component leaving the tail long.

The long tail is doubled back after passing around the thimble and through a swage fitting. A loop is locked in the long tail with a cable lock fitting with nuts on it.

Now the magic. A chain with a hook is fitted into the 1st swaged joint and a non airworthy hardware store turn buckle is attached to the long tail with a loop.

Crank on the turn buckle until specified tension is achieved and swage the other end. Trim off the long tail and loop and repeat until all 8 drag anti drag wires are perfect. In the process you might scrap $1 in cable but save $500-1000 mileage may vary. The big buckets of surplus are in planes or unknown hoards.

Necessity is the mother of invention!

Of course is you build a Geodetic wing the needs for turnbuckles is also eliminated. The Flaglor Scooter took this approach. I don't think ken liked paying for turn buckles.

Ken is one of the good guys!
 

fly2kads

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Thanks for that description!

And speaking of Ken Flaglor, I would still like to find a set of plans for his Scooter, just because....
 

Pops

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I know it's off topic but I, and probably a lot of others here, would like to know more about his method of turnbuckle-less tension adjustment.

Regarding the intake gasket: you don't need the red RTV. It dissolves in gas. I've never had a leak using only the bare metal gasket and I've probably installed north of a thousand over the years. This excludes missing manifold ears that have been deformed by others using the fiber gaskets. Double check that this hasn't happened to your manifold as well. Doesn't matter if it's a thick aluminum casting or a stamped metal flange - they both can bend.
I agree, just use the thin metal gasket that comes in the gasket set kit for the engine. VW engineers were good.

I prefer the stiffness of geodetic wings and hard to beat the lightness.
 

Pops

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And after the job of installing new gaskets and starting the engine, spray a little WW-40 around the gasket and see if there is a rpm increase. IF so, you have an intake leak. The dual port intakes seal a little better than the copper ring single port heads.
 

103

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Wauwatosa WI
I like the Pitts method. Thread the wire at each end, run it through each spar and a small wood block, tighten with a wrench.


BJC
Yes that works great too on solid spars with access front and back.
 
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