Industrial engine conversion. *Private* group.

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blane.c

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Answer; He lives in CA.

Ok i will verify the cc on motor I have and if you guys want it I will tear it down and see what i have that's usable as far as mock up parts and if they pay the shipping they can have it
 

Vigilant1

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So, looks like Briggs will survive this. Although without its blood sucking greedy board of directors.
That's good news for us.
Expect significant changes in their product lines, etc. It would be interesting to know if the 49 series (810cc) was a moneymaker for them and the relative profitability of the Vanguard (forged crank, forged rods, etc) and the B&S commercial/turf series engines.
I suspect the local papers and press near the Augusta plant where these engines are made will provide early word of any plans to change/eliminate production.
 
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TiPi

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Apparently it was, for Engineer Spacek in the Czech republic, the SD Minisport guy. My sense is that the European distributor for Kohler got on his case for the "SE31" engine based on "Brand K". Maybe TiPi knows more about that. Or I can strobe Engineer Spacek (Ivan?) for the story.
Kohler did send a letter to Spacek through their lawyers requesting not to use their brand name (and lots of threats if he doesn't comply). That's when Igor named the engine the SE31, the small Briggs was called the SE24 (the SE33 was still in development) and all reference to Kohler and B&S was removed from his website.
 

TiPi

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My nephew has a small engine repair shop so I asked him some questions about the 810cc. His answer follows just for general info.

Sorry have been super swamped with work but at any rate I will let you know what i can off the top of my head Yes crank shafts are forged steel very nice temper to them and if you get the tapered shaft no there Is no key way of any kind which in my opinion for a plane type installation that's gonna be a much safer route because there is no key to fail on you the center section of crank is threaded for a bolt which of course forces it onto crank shaft as you tighten it down then to pull whatever it may be off the said crank you just use all thread and couple nuts and washers to make a spanner to force it off of the shaft the newer model briggs your talking about is a great engine as far as dependability goes its very well made but there big flaw is that it has a 2 piece block to it because of it bieng made of aluminum I imagine but at any rate the thing bolts top to bottom or side to side depending on your application but they are notorious for getting themselves loosened up and well end result.as you can imagine it has an internal detination and usually leaves 4-6 small holes in the block before its done lol I have seen a few now and always tgmhe same size holes in about the same locations the solution to there design flaw is just some good ol fashioned lock tight then everything remains virtually as designed and stays together
Jeremiah Smith


Hi how are you doing
Hope that helps to answer some of your questions i do have a grenades block from 1 of those motors in my scrap pile from a generator if you would like some pictures of anything
Hi blane.c, good info, thanks.
To clarify, the "2 piece block" is the block and cover? Briggs changed the sealing from a gasket to a sealant on some engines, apparently to overcome the movement between the 2 parts. When I pulled my engine apart, the bolts were very tight and full of yellow gunk ("loctite"). Movement between the cover & block should not result in a failed engine, just oil leaks. The holes in the block are usually from a failed conrod.
 

proppastie

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The holes in the block are usually from a failed conrod.
probably after all the oil leaks out,,,,,,a mower or generator the operator might not notice......hopefully a pilot would notice
 

Vigilant1

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I imagine the situation is the same regarding OEM car engines, snowmobile engines, etc for aircraft. Just don't actively promote your airplane engine as an Acme Engine, take easy steps to "anonymize" the engine's appearance (remove their labels, etc), and Acme will pretty much leave you alone. That appears to be true whether you are making one for yourself or modifying them and selling them to others.
 

Topaz

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I imagine the situation is the same regarding OEM car engines, snowmobile engines, etc for aircraft. Just don't actively promote your airplane engine as an Acme Engine, take easy steps to "anonymize" the engine's appearance (remove their labels, etc), and Acme will pretty much leave you alone. That appears to be true whether you are making one for yourself or modifying them and selling them to others.
It's the same situation with kitplane manufacturers when you make significant (meaning "readily visible") modifications to their design. They ask you to list the manufacturer/type as "<yourname>". And really, you can't blame them. They're not involved in the modifications you're making to their product, they don't have any control over the quality of those mods, or the quality/safety/suitability of your finished and altered version of their product. It's really not their design anymore.
 

rv7charlie

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I believe that the builder's name as mfgr is *required* for homebuilts in the USA, regardless of kit company policy.
 

vhhjr

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I just received an AMR300 roots blower in the mail and it's just the cutest thing. Weighs about 10 lbs and the price is right, about $175. I'm using it as a high volume, low pressure air compressor on a non-aviation, non-engine project, but there are several Youtube videos of Briggs, Predator and Kohler V-twins with this blower installed. Apparently, there's considerable HP to be had with one. Especially, if you replace the engine innards with aftermarket parts. I watched one of a Briggs that's putting out 70 HP. There appears to be a lot of use on airboats and ATVs.

Planes will fly on 22 HP, but they will fly better on more.

Vince Homer
 

Hot Wings

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Interesting. Why are all of the ones on eBay listed as 'refurbished'?

The RHB31/VZ21 turbos are under 8#.
 

Vigilant1

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Considering that these are air-cooled engines (without much ability to get above-stock cooling of the heads) combined with our typical airplane duty cycle (”lots of power needed lots of the time"), I'd think the main application for either a turbocharger or supercharger with these engines would be mild turbonormalizing. Maybe very short-term use (get a seaplane up on the step and/or off the water, etc). Or, we could spend the weight and money on more NA cc's and in the bargain get a larger head (more cooling area) and eliminate some complexity.
 
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