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Mcmark

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2013
Messages
388
Location
Owings, MD
There’s an article in Sport Aerobatics about Mark and his rebuild and flying of the airplane. I’ve watched him compete with it at the Sportsman level with success. He earns every point he gets.
A friend lofted and built the custom cowl for the airplane. John does great work.
 

Twodeaddogs

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
951
Location
Dunlavin, County Wicklow,Ireland
Of course, you realise that Chipmunk purists scoff at American conversions to the one true Chipmunk, which must be in RAF red and white, be dragged along by a dripsy Gipsy, carry only enough fuel to get to the next parish, have a dark, black cockpit interior, drink oil and will unfailingly cease to work at 11.00 and 16.30 precisely (tea time). Primary colours worn by other Air Forces will be tolerated. The only literature to be tolerated will be of DH or RAF origin. Maintenance will only be carried out by white-overalled mechanics, overseen by Inspectors in light blue shop coats. Spare parts will arrive in cardboard boxes, bound by twine and held together by staples, to which a cardboard serviceability label is affixed by twine. These cardboard boxes will be plain brown and unadorned by logos except those of DH and other approved suppliers. They will smell faintly of long storage, glue, paint, tea, and oil. The storeman delivering said items will wear the signature clothing of his trade, the brown shop coat. He will also smell of the same unguents that apply to the spare parts, along with cigarette smoke from Woodbines or Players Navy Cut. He may sport a pen or a pencil in a top pocket but never more than two. He may also sport a cigarette resting on top of an ear.
Pilots must wear appropriate flying clothing; stained overalls, a proper flying helmet (none of this David Clark nonsense), gentlemen's shoes, a scarf and proper flying gloves and Mk.8 goggles. mechanics will wear overalls, grimy, servicing, one, for the use of. This must be worn over a stained t-shirt or vest, equally filthy and a pair of boots, usually ex-Service. These are his long-service identification devices and gives him the aura of a proper "oul sweat". These items fit only him and are often accompanied by a grimy cap which has moulded to his skull, as befits a proper, well worn-in headgear. It is as important to him as a pilot's flying helmet, for it identifies him as one of the Craft. Like the Storeman, he will exude a cocktail of smells, many of which are industrial in nature, and some more natural, such as engine oil and petrol, hydraulic fluid, glue, dope, brake dust, sweat, the odd drop of blood, farts (beer,etc), rubber, cardboard and various food smells, many of which cling to him like a second skin. He will also smell of cigarette smoke.
Inspectors, having risen above the level of mechanic, will wear the blue shop coat, as befits his station. He may sport a clipboard and pen as he does his rounds. His clothing has been washed more than once so he is certainly less pungent than his mechanics. He may smell faintly of hair oil. Some of his ilk, once they have cast off the overalls, never wear them again but a true Inspector will always have a pair handy, in case he has to weigh in. It will be kept clean, at the back of the locker, just to remind him of his origins and true calling.
Proper Chipmunk pilots are ex-Service but there are civilian Chipmunk pilots but they are not the same and they stand out as pretenders to the throne. Proper Chipmunk pilots have flown bigger, noisier, deadlier machines yet always profess to prefer the Chippie to all other types. They are inveterate name-droppers, have multiple thousands of hours and quite often, have stopped writing flying hours into logbooks but mutter "about 20, 000, or thereabouts", when pushed to elicit a number. They regard other pilots as Chipmunk pilots or The Rest. Anyone who flies a Cessna 172 or PA-28 is treated with the deference due the mildly disturbed...."if one must".....they speak on equal terms with other Service pilots, depending on which aircraft type the other has flown, and Inspectors of a certain age. Older mechanics who are not Inspectors are also held in respect, but young upstarts, be they pilot or mechanic, are treated as if they were The Help, to be shamelessly bled for cigarettes and beer. They are expected to tell outrageous lies about their prowess with aircraft/women/cars, not in any particular order, as long as they stand their round at the bar. They are expected to drive fast cars, keep loose women on the go, back horses, drink more than is good for them and not bend the aircraft. When they fly, they must make it look easy, so that mere mortals who dwell on the ground are fooled into thinking that any old fool can fly a Chipmunk......
 

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
11,569
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
Of course, you realise that Chipmunk purists scoff at American conversions to the one true Chipmunk, which must be in RAF red and white, be dragged along by a dripsy Gipsy, carry only enough fuel to get to the next parish, have a dark, black cockpit interior, drink oil and will unfailingly cease to work at 11.00 and 16.30 precisely (tea time)....
Yes, I do. And that explaines why I have always loved the Chipmunk, why I searched for, and found, a pristine Chipmunk that was just as you described the one true Chipmunk, and also why I decided not to buy it.


BJC
 

Tiger Tim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
3,305
Location
Thunder Bay
Of course, you realise that Chipmunk purists scoff at American conversions to the one true Chipmunk, which must be in RAF red and white, be dragged along by a dripsy Gipsy, carry only enough fuel to get to the next parish, have a dark, black cockpit interior, drink oil and will unfailingly cease to work at 11.00 and 16.30 precisely (tea time). Primary colours worn by other Air Forces will be tolerated. The only literature to be tolerated will be of DH or RAF origin. Maintenance will only be carried out by white-overalled mechanics, overseen by Inspectors in light blue shop coats. Spare parts will arrive in cardboard boxes, bound by twine and held together by staples, to which a cardboard serviceability label is affixed by twine. These cardboard boxes will be plain brown and unadorned by logos except those of DH and other approved suppliers. They will smell faintly of long storage, glue, paint, tea, and oil.
I'm on board with every word of this.
 

Derswede

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
957
Location
Central North Carolina
Twodeaddogs, I am still laughing at your list, which is quite correct. As having been a Yank owning a few "proper cars", I agree totally. The one thing you missed is if you MUST own such a car or aeroplane, you MUST have the proper accent....and my god, if you somehow dare to mispronounce the name (or pronounce it as is common in YOUR country), you will be flogged, and forced to drink Budweiser instead of "REAL" beer or ale. If you would like to test this comment, call a Jaguar a "Jag-Wire" in front of a Brit and listen for the fallout. ("Jag-u-are" is the British pronunciation). Oh, and most any MG will run exactly as you mention...when I asked a British friend about that, he looked down his nose at me and stated...."A British car must run only as long as the island. If you have gone farther than that, you must do the proper maintenance." Having owned a Jag and a Twin Cam MGA (and I sold them, I'm an idiot), I can confirm that Twodeaddogs is spot on.

There is a Chipmunk sitting at a field near me, but as I have no rich, sick aunts or uncles from which I may gain an inheritance, I will stay with the more mundane US built aircraft. My E-type Jag cost me enough to teach me that lesson.

Derswede
 

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
11,569
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
.. There is a Chipmunk sitting at a field near me, but as I have no rich, sick aunts or uncles from which I may gain an inheritance, I will stay with the more mundane US built aircraft.
Derswede
There was one, for sale, at Silver Creek airport some years ago. Nice airplane, nice owner.


BJC
 
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