Ideal CNC

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by Atomic_Sheep, Dec 5, 2016.

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  1. Dec 6, 2016 #21

    weasel

    weasel

    weasel

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    Keep holding........
     
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  2. Dec 6, 2016 #22

    ToddK

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    I have been eyeballing a Shapeoko 3 for a while. It does wood, aluminum, and plastic. Pretty handy, fairly cheap, and comes in several sizes.

    Congratulations. Loosing weight is probably the hardest thing an average person will ever do. I took the exact opposite approach. Doing the keto diet. Lots of fat and super low carb. I have lost 30 lbs, no exercise, no hunger. Going to get BBQ for lunch. I do plan on having blood work done in another 15lbs. I will probably cut the fat a bit and stay low carb. I had no idea the harm that extra 30lbs was doing. I feel so much better without it.
     
  3. Dec 6, 2016 #23

    Jay Kempf

    Jay Kempf

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    I built a machine based on 72" 1/2-10 rods. I sort of backwards engineered it around that so it ended up with a workspace of right around 60" x 60" x 14" but the target was 48 x 48 x 12. I built the bed open in Z so that you could slide a 4 x 8 sheet through. Most materials are not available in much bigger than 4 x 8 so that is really practically the limit of home shop work spaces. Smaller machines store better because most times you will be doing small parts anyway so it can have a home somewhere. It is also possible to build a machine vertical and only consume wall space but you have to deal with gravity of course with the workpiece which takes some planning. I also hung all the controls and computers off of the main chassis so the whole thing is portable around the shop. And the best part is that I only have about $750 in the whole rig. Now this thing isn't going to cut tool steel but it is perfect for cutting soft materials to sanding tolerances which is what we need.

    Here's the truth about large machines. You don't need one for a one off. You can cut mold blocks on a smaller machine and you can cut accurate fixture features on the edges. You can then assemble those smaller pieces together on a large table to get a large mold. If you do that well you will have minimal or no sanding to fix some inter mold block areas that might transfer to the finished part. You can do all the tooling separation and planning in the CAD machine so it really is no extra effort.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2016 #24

    harrisonaero

    harrisonaero

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    My new mold making machine has a travel of 12.5'x6.5'x3'. All AC brushless servos, 1600 ipm rapids. That big enough :)
     
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  5. Dec 7, 2016 #25

    BBerson

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  6. Dec 7, 2016 #26

    Hot Wings

    Hot Wings

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    A little more Z would be nice.
     
  7. Dec 7, 2016 #27

    harrisonaero

    harrisonaero

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    My other router is a 4'x8'x6" travel and stepper driven (can lose steps if stalled) so I definitely wanted a little more room to grow plus wanted good Japanese servos that wouldn't lose their position. It was a lot of work to design and money to get built but it turned out nice and works well for my business.
     
  8. Dec 7, 2016 #28

    cheapracer

    cheapracer

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    I think you should seriously consider what bed size you need to place a 1220 x 2440 standard sized aluminium sheet down.

    I work around that sheet size and it covers everything for me, your largest former with tabs to be folded should come in just under that width.
     
  9. Dec 7, 2016 #29

    Hot Wings

    Hot Wings

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    So not store bought plug and play?

    I've got an old mill/lathe thing I'd like to convert and servos would be better for this than steppers. I'd be interested in the hardware you used for the servos and encoders. Are they discrete motors and encoders or steppers with an encoder hung on the back making a hybrid system.

    I'm not worried so much about loosing steps but eliminating error by putting the feedback sensors directly on the axis rather than on the drive screws.
     
  10. Dec 8, 2016 #30

    Atomic_Sheep

    Atomic_Sheep

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    Thanks guys, didn't think there were standard material sizes for aircraft construction - thought there was a very wide range of sizes available, will have to look into it some more. I guess the same rules apply no matter what you build.

    That's feet if I'm not mistaken? That's a pretty massive machine if it is.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016
  11. Dec 8, 2016 #31

    harrisonaero

    harrisonaero

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    Yes, it's pretty large. Getting ready to start milling a 12' long horizontal stabilizer plug this week (will include skin plus all ribs and spars in one mold) and it will do it all in one setup. But there are a lot larger machines out there (Janicki, etc), mine is just a good size for my shop and for doing development work. I sized it so that for most Part-23 size airplanes I only need to slide the plug once for any large part.
     
  12. Dec 8, 2016 #32

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    But the cuts don't look even remotely like the pattern drawn on the wood.
     
  13. Jan 13, 2019 #33

    erkki67

    erkki67

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    7DDADE07-91A4-47D9-8C2A-0493C0D4166D.jpeg

    I’d like to find the plans for such a critter in the dimensions 4 x 8 or 5 x 10, any suggestions?

    I’m very tight on space!
     
  14. Jan 13, 2019 #34

    Bill-Higdon

    Bill-Higdon

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  15. Jan 13, 2019 #35

    erkki67

    erkki67

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    This is the stuff I’m looking for, thank you for this idea.
     
  16. Jan 13, 2019 #36

    Bill-Higdon

    Bill-Higdon

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    FYI There's a place in El Paso, TX that advertises a vertical CNC, but I haven't heard any good words about them
     
  17. Jan 14, 2019 #37

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Who's selling CNC machines in El Paso? El Paso's close enough I could run down there and take a look. Maybe it's fixable.
     
  18. Jan 16, 2019 #38

    Armilite

    Armilite

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    =========================================================

    Desired Material You want to use and the Design you want to use plays a lot into How Big of Tools you really need. A Cessna 172 is made up of many Hundreds of Small Parts, all Riveted, Welded, maybe even Glued together to make Bigger Parts. A Certified vs an Exsperimental Airframe makes a difference. A True Metal Craftsman doesn't need CNC, but CNC can cut down your Part Build Time. Today, if you Shop around you can find good used 1st Generation CNC Mills & Lathes, and even 2nd Generation CNC Tools for under $5000. Even New 3rd Generation CNC is much Cheaper today. Tools that would be Handy, depending an Type of Airframe, CNC Tube Bender, CNC 5 Axis Router, CNC Laser, CNC Water Jet. Like years ago, I could have bought a 5 Axis Industrial Gantry Router 5' x 20' x 48" High Gantry for $7000 off eBay, that would have been real nice for making Fiberglass Molds. Today, they even have Large Scale 3D Printer Atachments for some of these Routers. Used CNC Laser's are around $7000+. Large CNC Water Jets are harder to come by that is reasonable. There was a Small CNC Water Jet coming out on the market that was $5000. I forget the Actual Size, but like 3' x 4'. There are some Kit's & Plans out there, but for anything that you want real Precise, I would go with the Heavier Industrail Tools, they can be Upgraded.

    I just noticed you're in Australia, looks like Coast to Coast about 2700 miles. Most of the Major Size Towns are along the Coast. So a Cessna 182, or even a Cessna 310, or Cessna 337 would be nice to Hauling Supplies & People around the Out Back. Logistic's for Plane Sales/Parts to the World would be your biggest problem. How many 172 Type Airplanes do you think you could make and Sell in a Year?

    Vans Aircraft is probably the most Successful Kitplane Manufacture in the World. Maybe become a Dealer.
    https://vansaircraft.com/

    There was a guy in Canada many years ago that reproduced about 80% of the parts for a Cessna 182 which is used up there for Float Planes for Supplies. One day, one of his friends says, your making 80% of the 182 parts now, why not make the rest and offer it as a kitplane. So he did. I believe it was called the Cyclone, later changed to Super Cyclone. The Guy was a Great Metal Craftsman, but not a great Salesman, never had any Dealerships yet, last I knew. Depending on your Skills, your Budget, and Space, if I was you, I would try to just get a Super Cyclone Distributorship if you want a (4) Seat Aircraft, or Buy one of the other established Kitplanes that might meet your demands. There isn't many (4) Seat Kitplanes out there. Some nice (2) Seat Aircraft that may be bought is the Dragonfly(Molds), Q200, SQ2000, Burket(Molds).

    Super Cyclone (Cessna 182 Type)
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/st-justaviation/index.html

    1992 Amada LCE-655 Lasmac 1500 Watt CNC Laser - $2,950 Needs some repair!
    https://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ram/tls/d/1992-amada-lce-655-lasmac-1500-watt-cnc/6785627537.html

    My Favorite (4) Seater was called the Lancair, now EVOLUTION.
    http://www.evolutionaircraft.com/

    A Stretched Cessna 337 with a Single High 400+HP Engine on the back with Extended Tanks gives you a Long Range Airplane.
     

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